CAN Announcements

From one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Next Colloquium Nov 13
Michael Adams, Environics
From award-winning author Michael Adams, Could It Happen Here? draws on groundbreaking new social research to show whether Canadian society is at risk of the populist forces afflicting other parts of the world.
Americans elected Donald Trump. Britons opted to leave the European Union. Far-right, populist politicians channeling anger at out-of-touch “elites” are gaining ground across Europe. In vote after shocking vote, citizens of Western democracies have pushed their anger to the top of their governments’ political agendas. The votes have varied in their particulars, but their unifying feature has been rejection of moderation, incrementalism, and the status quo.
Amid this roiling international scene, Canada appears placid, at least on the surface. As other societies retrench, the international media have taken notice of Canada’s welcome of Syrian refugees, its half-female federal cabinet, and its acceptance of climate science and mixed efforts to limit its emissions. After a year in power, the centrist federal government continues to enjoy majority approval, suggesting an electorate not as bitterly split as the ones to the south or in Europe.
As sceptics point out, however, Brexit and a Trump presidency were unthinkable until they happened. Could it be that Canada is not immune to the same forces of populism, social fracture, and backlash that have afflicted other parts of the world? Our largest and most cosmopolitan city elected Rob Ford. Conservative Party leadership hopeful Kellie Leitch proposes a Canadian values test for immigrants and has called the Trump victory “exciting.” Anti-tax demonstrators in Alberta chanted “lock her up” in reference to Premier Rachel Notley, an elected leader accused of no wrongdoing, only policy positions the protesters disliked.
Pollster and social values researcher Michael Adams takes Canadians into the examining room to see whether we are at risk of coming down with the malaise affecting other Western democracies. Drawing on major social values surveys of Canadians and Americans in 2016—as well as decades of tracking data in both countries—Adams examines our economy, institutions, and demographics to answer the question: could it happen here?
Canadian Studies Colloquium
11:30 AM, Tuesday November 13
223 Moses Hall
Canadian Studies is pleased to be a co-sponsor of the below event
RACE AND THE APPARATUS OF DISPOSABILITY
Thursday, Nov 15, 2018 | 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Multicultural Community Center, MLK Student Union Building, UC Berkeley
Location is ADA accessible
Sherene H. Razack, Distinguished Professor and the Penny Kanner Endowed Chair in Gender Studies, UCLA
Disposability, a condition written on the body, is a racial project. Populations that stand in the way of the progress of capital accumulation, are targeted for disposability, and relegated to the realm of “sub-humanity.” Processes of disposability enable white Europeanness to prevail. In this paper, I pursue what race has to do with disposability through an examination of the death in custody of a Roma refugee. I show that states have to arrange for the reduction of bodies to human waste and individuals who are a part of the medical and apparatus of disposability (prison guards, medical doctors, psychologists, coroners, lawyers, judges, legislators, and scholars), perform their part in disposability through a professionally and institutionally sustained belief in the lesser value of racialized populations. We can trace the racial along several routes: who is produced as disposable, the infrastructure of disposability, and notably the medical and legal apparatus required to transform the destruction of bodies into authorized killing. In this presentation, I spend most of my time tracing the destruction of the body of a Roma refugee who died in a detention center. I end with comments about the connections that can be drawn between the processes of disposability for refugees, African Americans, Canadians, and Indigenous peoples who die at the hands of the police. These connections reveal disposability to be a racial and global process orchestrated by states and sustained by professionals (medical, legal, police).
Sherene H. Razack is Distinguished Professor and the Penny Kanner Endowed Chair in Gender Studies, UCLA. Her books include: Dying from Improvement: Inquests and Inquiries into Indigenous Deaths in Custody (2015); At the Limits of Justice: Women of Colour On Terror (2014, ed. with Suvendrini Perera); States of Race (2011, co-editor with Malinda Smith and Sunera Thobani); Casting Out: Race and the Eviction of Muslims From Western Law and Politics (2008); Dark Threats and White Knights: The Somalia Affair, Peacekeeping and the New Imperialism (2004); Looking White People in the Eye (1998).
Co-sponsored by:
Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative
Canadian Studies
HIFIS Diversity and Democracy Cluster
HIFIS Diversity and Health Disparities Cluster
Native American Studies
Townsend Center for the Humanities
Multicultural Community Center
WSSA Call for Papers
The Western Social Sciences Association (WSSA) has released the call for papers for their 2019 conference. Limited travel funds may be available from Canadian Studies for Berkeley faculty & students presenting on Canadian topics at WSSA.
Canadian Studies is pleased to share the information about the below event, of interest to the Canadian community in the Bay Area
Grace Cathedral, San Francisco
Remembrance Service
November 11, 2018
3:00 pm
This cherished annual ceremony, in this year of the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, commemorates those who have lost their lives in armed conflict.
The service includes the deeply moving cascade of thousands of poppy petals onto the altar as Amazing Grace is played on the bagpipes.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

We Remember: 100th Anniversary of the End of the Great War

From Canada’s History magazine.


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Canada's History

The Great War Video Series

November 11, 2018, marks the hundredth anniversary of the end of the First World War. Here are just a few key Canadian battles along the road to armistice in 1918.
Watch now

Keep Their Memory Alive

The 2018 Armistice Pure Silver limited-edition coin, captured in pure silver, conveys a deep meaning for those who served in the Great War. Learn more

A Father’s Grief

On September 13, 1918, Captain Robert Bartholomew suffered a sudden nervous breakdown after reading his son’s name in a newspaper casualty list. Read more

The Breakthrough

How, after years of stalemate, did the Allies manage to win the war?
Read more

 

After 1918: From Chaos to Mackenzie King!

With the Great War came great social turmoil. Strange, then, how little things actually changed. Read more

The War to End All War

November 2018 marks the one hundredth anniversary of the end of the First World War. A century later, the conflict continues to affect us — even if we don’t fully realize it. The War to End All War is our collection of 60+ articles, podcasts, and videos from the past ten years, including contributions from Charlotte Gray, Michael Bliss and Tim Cook. Read, watch, listen

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Kevin Swan explains, “The Default Of Any Tech Company Is Failure”

From one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Subscribe to our stories
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06 November 2018

This edition of ‘our stories_’ features Kevin Swan, VP of Corporate Development at Solium. He states that as long as emerging Canadian high-growth companies continue to disrupt themselves, Canada has a chance to build the necessary ‘anchor’ tenants in the startup ecosytem.

Kevin shares how important it is to have that grit and “insatiable desire to continue winning”, as the default of any tech company is failure.

C100 is proud to share this video series featuring real-life stories of successes, failures, and insights from our community of accomplished Canadian leaders in technology who are dedicated to supporting future Canadian leaders in technology.

Please keep the conversation going by subscribing below, commenting on the video, and telling us what other topics you would like to see covered in future episodes. We value your input!

The C100 Team

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Copyright © 2018 C100 Association, All rights reserved.

The Press Democrat – Close to Home: Remembering Americans who served with Canadians in World War I

Original article available at https://www.pressdemocrat.com/opinion/8925848-181/close-to-home-remembering-americans


Close to Home: Remembering Americans who served with Canadians in World War I

RANA SARKAR
RANA SARKAR IS CONSUL GENERAL OF CANADA IN SAN FRANCISCO. | November 8, 2018, 12:07AM

This year, as every year since 1918, on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, bugles will resonate across the United States and Canada to remember those who lost their lives defending our liberties. In ceremonies across our two countries, wreaths will be laid at war memorials, and veterans and soldiers will parade to honor the fallen.

This year’s Veterans Day, or Remembrance Day as it is called in Canada, will be different, however, as we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. More than 116,000 Americans and 60,000 Canadians lie in Flanders’ Fields and elsewhere, having fought and made the ultimate sacrifice for their countries.

It’s well known that Canadians fought and died with Americans in two world wars and Korea. We joined the U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan after 9/11. We are both founding members of NATO. And, this year, we celebrated the 60th anniversary of NORAD, the North American Aerospace Defense Command. As this shows, over the past two centuries, Canada and the United States have built the strongest partnership between any two countries.

What is less well known is how deep and personal these connections are.

More than 40,000 Americans enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, Canada’s World War I army. They served throughout the Canadian armed forces in such large numbers that they formed an “American Legion,” staffing the 97th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

Americans also served in other CEF battalions, fighting in the trenches, flying Canadian planes, tending Canadian wounded and sailing on Canadian Navy and merchant marine ships.

Those Americans fought with distinction, and an estimated 2,700 of them never made it home.

This week, as we mark the centenary of the end of World War I, we will remember them. The Royal Canadian Legion, U.S. Zone, Branch No. 25, will observe this anniversary at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Liberty Cemetery in Petaluma. All are invited.

Rana Sarkar is consul general of Canada in San Francisco.


Original article available at https://www.pressdemocrat.com/opinion/8925848-181/close-to-home-remembering-americans

CAN Announcements

From one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Next Colloquium Nov 06
Prof. Julie Burelle, UCSD
Julie Burelle holds a PhD from the joint program in Drama and Theatre at UC San Diego and UC Irvine. Originally from Quebec, Canada, Julie has studied and taught theatre on both coasts of Canada and of the United States. She earned a B.A. in Theatre from the University of Toronto. Julie’s research is invested in a decolonizing project and is in conversation with the fields of Performance Studies, Cultural Studies, and Native American studies among others. Her most recent work focuses on how questions of First Nations sovereignty, cultural identity, and nationhood are negotiated through performances in the particular context of Quebec, a province whose national aspirations have often occupied center stage. Her case studies include theatrical and cinematic performances, and political and land-based protests. Julie has presented her work in multiple international settings and she has published in TheatreForum, TDR:The Drama Review, Dance Research Journal, as well as in various edited volumes.
As a practitioner, Julie works in collaborative settings and has served as a dramaturg for plays (most recently for Native Voices at the Autry, and for The Trip’s Orpheus and Eurydice), for dance projects (Les Noces Allyson Green / La Jolla Symphony and Chorus, Dee(a)r Spine by Sam Mitchell) and for documentary films (Québékoise by Mélanie Carrier and Olivier Higgins).
Dr. Burelle is the recipient of the 2017 Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Distinguished Teaching Award at UCSD — honoring her superb DEI teaching, cultural advocacy and public service efforts — and the 2018 Hellman Fellowship to pursue her research on Indigenous theatre and dance in Québec, Canada.
Canadian Studies Colloquium
Co-Sponsored by Indigenous Americas Working Group
11:30 AM, Tuesday November 06
223 Moses Hall
Bloemraad Featured Scholar of 2018
Irene Bloemraad was honored by the Center for Migration Studies and SAGE Publishing as the International Migration Review’s “Featured Scholar of 2018.” She delivered a keynote address at the annual Center for Migration Studies symposium in New York on “Understanding Membership in a World of Global Migration: (How) Does Citizenship Matter?”
Antíkoni:
Staged Readings By Beth Piatote
See Canadian Studies Affiliated Professor Beth Piatote in this limited run production!
LOCATION
Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology | 102 Kroeber Hall, UC Berkeley Campus
DATE
November 06, 2018
TIME
5:30 PM
Antíkoni
Staged Readings
By Beth Piatote
Directed by Jenni(f)er Tamayo
Free Event | Register Here
In this modern, haunting adaptation of Sophocles’ classic tragedy, Antigone, a Native American family is torn apart as they struggle over the fate of ancestral remains and their conflicting loyalties to different notions of tradition, law, and the price of sacrifice.
Limited run
Preview: Tuesday, November 6th at 5:30PM
Performances: Wednesday, November 7th at 1:00PM and 7:00PM
located at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, 102 Kroeber Hall
Doors will open for chair and floor seating 30 minutes prior to each show.
ADA accessible.
Sponsored by
Upcoming Colloquium Nov 13
Michael Adams, Environics
From award-winning author Michael Adams, Could It Happen Here? draws on groundbreaking new social research to show whether Canadian society is at risk of the populist forces afflicting other parts of the world.
Americans elected Donald Trump. Britons opted to leave the European Union. Far-right, populist politicians channeling anger at out-of-touch “elites” are gaining ground across Europe. In vote after shocking vote, citizens of Western democracies have pushed their anger to the top of their governments’ political agendas. The votes have varied in their particulars, but their unifying feature has been rejection of moderation, incrementalism, and the status quo.
Amid this roiling international scene, Canada appears placid, at least on the surface. As other societies retrench, the international media have taken notice of Canada’s welcome of Syrian refugees, its half-female federal cabinet, and its acceptance of climate science and mixed efforts to limit its emissions. After a year in power, the centrist federal government continues to enjoy majority approval, suggesting an electorate not as bitterly split as the ones to the south or in Europe.
As sceptics point out, however, Brexit and a Trump presidency were unthinkable until they happened. Could it be that Canada is not immune to the same forces of populism, social fracture, and backlash that have afflicted other parts of the world? Our largest and most cosmopolitan city elected Rob Ford. Conservative Party leadership hopeful Kellie Leitch proposes a Canadian values test for immigrants and has called the Trump victory “exciting.” Anti-tax demonstrators in Alberta chanted “lock her up” in reference to Premier Rachel Notley, an elected leader accused of no wrongdoing, only policy positions the protesters disliked.
Pollster and social values researcher Michael Adams takes Canadians into the examining room to see whether we are at risk of coming down with the malaise affecting other Western democracies. Drawing on major social values surveys of Canadians and Americans in 2016—as well as decades of tracking data in both countries—Adams examines our economy, institutions, and demographics to answer the question: could it happen here?
Canadian Studies Colloquium
11:30 AM, Tuesday November 13
223 Moses Hall
Announcements from Partner Canadian Studies Programs
The below comes to us from our friends at the University of Washington Canadian Studies Center:
SPECIAL CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
Dear Friends,
We’re recruiting for the University of Washington Fulbright Visiting Chair in Arctic Studies (2018-2019). Please consider applying or forward to your Canadian colleagues!
The Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Arctic Studies will be open to Canadian scholars that meet the eligibility requirements of the Fulbright Program. Specifically, the Chair will be focused on issues pertaining to Arctic Studies. Scholars and practitioners are invited to apply. Research interests may include the natural sciences, social sciences, arts or humanities. The Chair will carry out the program of research, teaching and service outlined in the successful application.
The teaching requirement includes a one-quarter, 3-credit, upper division seminar (ARCTIC 401) focused on the applicant’s research interests and appropriate to the students enrolled in the University of Washington’s minor in Arctic Studies. In addition, the Chair will provide the annual Fulbright Lecture focused on emerging issues and developments in the Arctic region and serve on the advisory board of the polar science and policy institute to build collaborative relations with Arctic scholars, scientists, and Indigenous organizations.
The Fulbright Visiting Research Chair is sponsored by the UW Office of Global Affairs; Division of Social Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences; Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; and, College of the Environment. It is administered and housed in the Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.
Sincerely,
Nadine Fabbi, Ed.D.
Managing Director
Canadian Studies Center | Arctic & International Relations
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
University of Washington
More information:
·    Follow this link for general info on the Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Arctic Studies.
·    How to apply? Follow this link for more information.
·    Learn more about previous Fulbright Chairs in Arctic Studies at the UW using this link.
The below comes to us from our friends at the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada:
The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada is accepting applications for the 2019/2020 Eakin Fellowship. We would greatly appreciate it if you could forward the following to your e-mail listservs. We’ve also attached our PDF advertisement in both English and French. Thank you!
The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada (MISC) is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for the Eakin Visiting Fellowship in Canadian Studies for the 2019/2020 academic year.
The Fellowship is awarded for periods of one or two academic semesters to an active scholar focusing on studies related to Canada. It is awarded for periods of one or two academic semesters to a scholar with a Ph.D., normally on sabbatical from their own academic institution. The position is open, in terms of rank and discipline, to dynamic scholars who can enrich the study of Canada with fresh perspectives. The Fellowship may also be awarded to an individual outside of the academic community, whose writing, research or public career are making a significant contribution to intellectual life in Canada.
The incumbent is expected to teach one undergraduate course in Canadian Studies at McGill University, deliver the Eakin Lecture (one Fellow per year), participate in the activities of the Institute, and pursue exchanges with colleagues at McGill and other institutions.
The Fellowship will offer a stipend of $15,000 per semester.
Applicants are invited to send:
·         Letter of Application
·         Curriculum Vitae
·         Letter of Reference
·         Course Proposal for an Advanced Seminar in Canadian Studies (one page maximum)
·         Indication of term preference: Fall 2019, Winter 2020, or a full year
Please send application materials by January 2, 2019 to:
Eakin Visiting Fellowship in Canadian Studies
McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
3463 Peel Street
Montréal (QC), H3A 1W7
or by email
Phone: (514) 398-8920
Fax: (514) 398-7336
The Eakin Visiting Fellowship in Canadian Studies was created with the generous support of the Eakin Family in memory of William R. Eakin.
Thank you very much!
Sincerely Yours,
The MISC Team
__________________________________________
McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
3463 Peel Street
Montreal, QC H3A 1W7
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

Inside Afghanistan: Life and the art of the barter

From the Legion Magazine.


Best-Selling 5-Volume Set
Front lines
Inside Afghanistan: Life and the art of the barter

Inside Afghanistan: Life and the art of the barter

Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne

Over the course of three Canadian army tours in their parched and war-ravaged homeland, Alex Watson came to know and respect the long-suffering Afghan people for their courage, resilience, devotion and unfailing courtesy. As a CiMiC (civilian-military co-operation) officer and later as a company commander attached to an Afghan National Army battalion, Watson became intimately acquainted with the citizens and culture Canadian troops were sent to protect.

READ MORE

2019 Wall Calendars
Juno Beach Centre launches dog tag campaign

Juno Beach Centre launches dog tag campaign

The Juno Beach Centre in Courseulles-sur-Mer, France, has launched a fundraising campaign featuring dog tags to commemorate the 5,500 Canadians killed in action during the Battle of Normandy in 1944. The money will support commemoration and educational activities as the centre marks the 75th anniversary of the landing in 2019.

READ MORE

Military Milestones
WW II Collection now available for only $49.99!

October 31, 1944
Clearing the Scheldt

Overnight on Oct. 31, 1944, Canadian troops fought to establish a foothold on Walcheren Island, the last obstacle to opening the port of Antwerp, Belgium, to Allied shipping.

The Allied invasion moved so quickly that by September, supplies had become a problem. What could be delivered through Allied-held ports or by air was insufficient to support an invasion of Germany.

Antwerp, about 100 kilometres inland on the Scheldt River, was in Allied hands and could handle 1,000 ships at a time, but the Germans commanded the river approaches in the Netherlands. The First Canadian Army was tasked with liberating the Scheldt, supported by British and Polish troops.

The gruelling campaign began on Oct. 2 to clear the Breskens Pocket and Leopold Canal and secure the islands on the river delta. At month’s end, the final task was to capture Walcheren Island, accessible only over a long and well-defended causeway where an anti-tank gun fired at troops trying to cross on foot.

In the late evening of Oct. 31, the Black Watch and Calgary Highlanders tried to cross, but were driven back with heavy casualties. In their second foray, the Highlanders inched across, overtook a German roadblock and established a bridgehead.

Troops fanned out from the foothold. When all officers of one company were killed or wounded, staff officer Major George Hees (later Minister of Veterans Affairs) volunteered to take over, staying in place even after being wounded in the arm. “It took a lot of guts for a guy who had never been in action to go into a hell-hole like that one,” the Highlanders’ commander Lieutenant-Colonel Ross Ellis said later.

Sergeant Emile Laloge earned the Distinguished Conduct Medal for picking up German grenades and throwing them back and taking over weapons of wounded and dead comrades and turning them on the enemy.

When two Le Régiment de Maisonneuve platoons took over the bridgehead, “It was like entering a giant blast furnace stoked with fireworks,” wrote one commander quoted on canadiansoldiers.com. Zigzagging forward, his platoon came under fire of a 20-millimetre gun and took shelter in a ditch, where “we shivered from cold and exhaustion, in waist-deep water.” Private J.C. Carrière earned the Military Medal by taking out the gun with an infantry anti-tank weapon.

Learning that no relief would come, the platoon had to retreat. “It was…every man for himself…in broad daylight, along the railroad bank from which the enemy could lob grenades and snipers, across the open field, had a clear view of moving targets,” wrote the commander.

Continuous fierce fighting put the island into Allied hands on Nov. 8. Antwerp opened to Allied shipping on Nov. 28, after clearing of obstacles and booby traps left by the Germans.

READ MORE

Iris