Tag Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

CAN Announcements

From another one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay area.


Peter Behrens Colloquium
September 11
“Families, Histories, Novels.”
Dear Friends of Canadian Studies,
We are pleased to open the Fall 2018 Colloquium series with Governor General’s Award-winning Canadian author Peter Behrens. Behrens will speak at 11:30 AM on Tuesday September 11 in 223 Moses Hall.
PETER BEHRENS’s first novel The Law of Dreams won the Governor-General’s Award, Canada’s most prestigious book prize, and has been published in nine languages. The New York Times Book Review called his second novel, The O’Briens, “a major achievement.” Carry Me, his third novel, was published in February 2016. He is the author of two collections of short stories, Night Driving and Travelling Light. His stories and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, The New York Times, and many anthologies. A native of Montreal, he held a Wallace Stegner Fellowship in Creative Writing at Stanford University and is currently a fellow at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.
Who: Award-winning author Peter Behrens
What: Canadian Studies Colloquium “Families, Histories, Novels.”
When: 11:30 AMTuesday September 11
Where: 223 Moses Hall
RSVP: No RSVP is required. Just show up!
Fall 2018 Colloquium Series
Tuesday September 11, 11:30 AM, 223 Moses Hall
Families, Histories, Novels
Peter Behrens (Fellow, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University)
Governor General’s Award Winner
Friday October 12, 3:30 PM, Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall
Why Canadians Love Immigration and Americans Aren’t So Sure
Prof. Irene Bloemraad (Sociology, & Canadian Studies, UC Berkeley)
Co-Sponsored by Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Institute
Tuesday November 6, 11:30 AM, 223 Moses Hall
Encounters on Contested Lands: Indigenous Performances of Sovereignty and Nationhood in Quebec
Prof. Julie Burelle (Theater & Dance, University of California San Diego)
Co-Sponsored by Indigenous Americas Working Group
Tuesday November 13, 11:30 AM, 223 Moses Hall
Could it Happen Here? Canada in the Age of Trump & Brexit
Michael Adams, OC (President, Environics Group)
Tuesday December 4, 11:30 AM, 223 Moses Hall
Hildebrand Scholars Roundtable
Speakers: Edward Hildebrand Fellows (Canadian Studies Graduate Students)
The Canadian Studies Colloquium Series is made possible by the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco | Silicon Valley
WLMK Postdoctoral Fellowship 2019
Harvard University
The Canada Program at Harvard University’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs invites applications for the William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellowships. Two fellows will be appointed for the 2019–2020 academic year, with the possibility of extending the fellowship for one additional year—conditional on the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, WCFIA associated faculty, and the co-hosting academic department.
The fellowships are open to scholars in all disciplines who are engaged in US-Canada comparative research and teaching, with preference given to individuals working within the social sciences and humanities. For postdoctoral candidates who will have completed the PhD within 12 months of the August 1, 2019 start date, verification of completion of the degree will be required prior to the appointment. Those in possession of a PhD for more than five years are ineligible.
The fellowships provide an annual stipend of $68,000, which is supplemented by funding for research and for individual health insurance coverage. The fellows will be required to teach one course during the year, and will be expected to engage with the Canada Program and with the University’s wider community. Fellows receive shared office space at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and enjoy full access to the University’s library, archival, and computing resources.
TO APPLY:
Candidates should submit: a letter of application describing their suitability for the fellowship; a curriculum vitae with a list of publications; a sample of their written work; a teaching portfolio, containing a statement on teaching experience and syllabi; and three letters of recommendation.
DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 1, 2018
We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy and pregnancy-related conditions or any other characteristic protected by law.
For more information about the WCFIA Canada Program, please visit: http://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/canada_program
Community Announcements
Quebec Elections
Des élections provinciales auront lieu au Québec le 1er octobre 2018. Voici le lien vers la section du site Web d’Élections Québec qui contient les conditions à remplir et les instructions pour voter hors Québec :
 www.elections.quebec/exterieur ou www.elections.quebec/outside pour la version anglaise. La demande d’inscription pour le vote hors Québec doit être reçue au plus tard le 12 septembre 2018 à 23 h 59, heure du Québec. Elle peut être faite en ligne ou par la poste.
Provincial elections will be held in Quebec on October 1, 2018. Here is the link to the section of the Elections Québec website which contains the conditions to be filled and instructions to vote outside Quebec:
 www.elections.quebec/exterieur or http://www.elections.quebec/outside for the English version. The application for registration for the vote outside Quebec must be received no later than September 12, 2018 at 11:59 pm, Québec time. It can be done online or by mail.
Canadian film at Global Climate Action Summit on Sept 13
The International Ocean Film Festival hosts a special screening of the award-winning Canadian film Bluefin: The Last of the Giants, a significant and internationally recognized documentary that highlights the dramatic decline of Bluefin tuna in the North Atlantic.
The first 15 minutes will include an excerpt from the film with the remaining 45-minute period incorporating a panel discussion. The discussion will feature the Canadian filmmaker John Hopkins and high-profile ocean experts discussing ocean policy for climate action. The screening will take place onThursday, September 13, 2018 from 11:15 am to 1:15 pm at Yerba Buena Gardens Center for the Arts at 701 Mission Street, in San Francisco, with a private reception to follow.
The mission of the International Ocean Film Festival is to save the ocean one film at a time. With the screening of Bluefin: The Last of the Giants, our goal is to inform our audiences of the understanding that good ocean stewardship is a critical component of climate change mitigation and adaptation strategy.
This event is free, but EventBrite registration is required. Register at this link: bluefinfilmscreening.eventbrite.com
Canadian Films at 2018 SF Green Films Festival
The Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco has sponsored three Canadian films that are part of the 2018 SF Green Film Festival: Anote’s ArkSilas, and Youth Unstoppable: The Rise of the Global Youth Climate Movement. In addition, the closing night feature film, The Condor & the Eagle, is a Canadian co-production and First Nations leader & activist Melina Laboucan-Massimo will be on stage at the Castro Theater for Q&A at the event. Closing night is Thursday, September 13 at 7:30 pm.
Save The Date
October 6 Thanksgiving
In partnership with the Digital Moose Lounge, Canadian Studies is pleased to present the 2nd annual Canadian Family Thanksgiving at Berkeley. Save the date of Saturday October 6. More information forthcoming.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN Margaret Atwood @ Cal Aug 23

An item from the Canadian Studies program at Berkeley.  Note the save the date for the Canadian Thanksgiving event at the bottom.


Margaret Atwood At BerkeleyAugust 23
Dear Friends of Canadian Studies,
We are pleased to announce that legendary Canadian author Margaret Atwood will speak on campus Thursday August 23. Ms. Atwood will deliver a lecture entitled “THE HANDMAID’S TALE ESCAPES FROM ITS BOOK” at 7:00 PM in Zellerbach Hall. Ms. Atwood’s talk is sponsored by the College of Letters & Science as part of the “On The Same Page” lecture series.
Admission is free to anyone with a Cal ID. At 6:45 PM, Zellerbach Hall will open the doors to people without an affiliation to Cal, if seats remain by that point.
Canadian Studies has secured a VERY LIMITED number of guaranteed seating tickets. If you would like to request a guaranteed seating ticket, please reply to this email. Guaranteed seating tickets in the reserved Canadian Studies section will be issued on a first come, first served basis, limit one ticket per person. If the number of requests exceeds the number of seats available to Canadian Studies, a lottery will be held to determine the ticket recipients.
Following the talk, a reception will be hosted by Canadian Studies on Lower Sproul Plaza.
Who: Legendary Canadian author Margaret Atwood
What: “THE HANDMAID’S TALE ESCAPES FROM ITS BOOK”
When: 7:00 PMThursday August 23
Where: Zellerbach Hall
Tickets: To request a guaranteed seating ticket, reply to this email. General Admission (open seating) will be available to anyone with a Cal ID. General Admission (open seating) will be available to the public at 6:45 PM, if seats remain. We recommend anyone seeking General Admission (open seating) entry to the event line up at Zellerbach well in advance of the program start time.
Save The Dates
September 11 Colloquium
Canadian Studies first Colloquium of the Spring 2018 semester will be Tuesday September 11, at 11:30 AM in 223 Moses Hall. Governor General’s Award-winning author Peter Behrens will speak about his new book “Families, Histories, Novels.” More information forthcoming.
October 6 Thanksgiving
In partnership with the Digital Moose Lounge, Canadian Studies is pleased to present the 2nd annual Canadian Family Thanksgiving at Berkeley. Save the date of Saturday October 6. More information forthcoming.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN June Announcements

From one of our fellow Canadian-focused organizations in the San Francisco bay area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Message from the Consul General
Dear Canadians and Friends of Canada,
Prime Minister Trudeau reaffirmed that no matter who we love or how we identify, all of us deserve to feel safe and secure, live free from discrimination and persecution, and express ourselves fully. We must continue to fight against homophobia, transphobia, and biphobia, and to defend gender expression, gender identity and sexual orientation rights. I am personally committed to fight hatred, honour love, and defend human rights for all.
It is in this spirit that I would like to invite you to join me to march together in the San Francisco Pride parade on Sunday June 24th.
Please note the link here for the invitation/RSVP. Please forward to your Canadian friends :  https://sfpride2018canadamexico.eventbrite.com
The march will begin around 11:00am, at the Embarcadero, and will end at the City Hall, at around 14:00. Please join me, together, we can build a world where all of us are free to be who we are and love who we love.
Dress comfortably, colorfully, bring your friends, family, your dogs…and your bottle of water. The exact departure point will be communicated very soon – look for Canadian rainbow flags.
For the first time this year, we will be joining the Mexican Consulate as a demonstration of North American solidarity!
Looking forward to meeting you!
Rana Sarkar
Consul General
San Francisco
Catching up with past Hildebrand Fellows
Edward M. Hildebrand Fellows are Berkeley Graduate Students who have received financial support for their dissertation research from Canadian Studies.
Brendan Shanahan, History
Brendan will be teaching US History here at Cal in Fall 2018 and Spring 2019.
Caitlin Tom, Political Science
Caitlin has accepted a 3-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Glendon College Political Science Department at York University in Toronto.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN Room Change 221 Kroeber Apr 27

Note this update from a fellow Bay area Canadian organization.


Canadian Studies Upcoming Events
Last Colloquium of the School Year:
Friday April 27
5:00 PM – Note Special Time!
221 Kroeber Hall – Note New Room!
Friday April 27, 5:00 PM
The Influence of Immigration on Tourism – The Case of Canada
Prof. Frederic Dimanche (Hospitality and Tourism Management, Ryerson University)
Co-Sponsored by the Tourism Studies Working Group
Over half of all immigrants in Canada settled in three major tourism destinations: Toronto, Vancouver and Montréal. Before the 1980s, Canada was welcoming over half of all immigrants and travellers from Europe and America. Now the share of these immigrants has decreased to under 30% as of 2016 and Asia has become over the years the main source of immigrants (over 48%). Mirroring this trend, tourist arrivals from Asia have increased while European arrivals stabilized. More specifically, the average growth in the number of Chinese tourists was almost 12% per year after 1990, and apart from the U.S., China now remains the top tourism market in Toronto and Vancouver, and it has a growing importance for tourism development in Montréal. Canada’s tourism sector has an employed labour force of over 1.7 million and almost 25% of these workers are immigrants or foreign workers. It is estimated that the demand for labour will increase to 2.29 million by 2035. However, the work force in the aging population will not be able to respond to that demand, and the role of immigrants in the job market will become more vital, especially in the metropolitan areas.
This study aims to determine the potential impacts of immigration on inbound tourism and on the Canadian labour market in cities by using secondary data. Statistical evidence strongly supports the hypothesis that immigration may be one of the major contributors to international travel flows and growth in the tourism sector.
Gifford Room, 221 Kroeber Hall
Colloquium events are free, and open to everyone. No ticket or RSVP is required.
The Canadian Studies Colloquium Series is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Community Events
Wednesday May 2, 11:30 AM Eastern
David Dodge CIFAR Lecture: Boundaries of Inclusion
Toronto, Ontario
Speaker: Professor Irene Bloemraad
Migration, Human Rights and National Values
While nationalism is growing around the world, record numbers of people are migrating beyond their country of birth. Increasingly, these migrants face hostility and discrimination by native-born citizens who see them as outsiders.
Ensuring that migrants are treated fairly is a human rights issue. Yet in Canada, the United States, and elsewhere, research suggests that the language of rights can harden attitudes towards migrants.
The 2018 David Dodge CIFAR Lecture is presented by Senior Fellow Irene Bloemraad of the program in Successful Societies at CIFAR. Dr. Bloemraad is a professor of Sociology and the Thomas Garden Barnes Chair of Canadian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Bloemraad will explore the complexities of framing and how we divide “us” from “them,” arguing that understanding and implementing the possibilities of inclusive nationalism is an urgent challenge in today’s world where some leaders are linking nationalism to policies that could close borders and drive further division.
Moderated by Elizabeth McIsaac, President of the Maytree Foundation, this lecture will be held in partnership with with Cities of Migration and the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants. Tickets are $15 and a light lunch is provided.
Wednesday May 2, 6:30 PM Pacific
Digital Moose Lounge Chesterfield Chat
Palo Alto, California
The Digital Moose Lounge is pleased to present our upcoming Chesterfield Chat event as part of our 2018 “Canadians Doing Good” series: Canadians Helping Immigrants in our Community.
Northern California is at the center of the national debate around immigration. Comprehensive Immigration Reform has stalled anew, and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program’s termination has created uncertainty for over 700,000 Dreamers. Meanwhile, rising anti-immigrant rhetoric and ICE raids have raised fears in our local immigrant communities. But behind the headlines, nonprofit lawyers continue to provide legal assistance to immigrants facing removal or seeking asylum before administrative tribunals and California courts. Hear our panel of local Canadians involved with immigrant legal services share their insights on how the current climate has affected their practice; what they have learned about our community; and how being Canadian has shaped their outlook.
April 28-29
Bay Area Book Festival, featuring several Canadian Writers
Berkeley, California
Katherena Vermette is a Métis writer from Treaty One territory in Winnipeg. Her first book, “North End Love Songs,” won the Governor General’s Award for Poetry. Her National Film Board short documentary, THIS RIVER, won the Coup de Coeur at the Montreal First Peoples’ Festival and a Canadian Screen Award. Her first novel, “The Break,” was a national bestseller in Canada and won the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award, the Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction, and the Carol Shields Winnipeg Book Award. “The Break” was shortlisted for a Governor General’s Literary Award, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and was a 2017 Canada Reads finalist.
Heather O’Neill is a novelist, poet, short-story writer, screenwriter, and essayist whose debut novel, “Lullabies for Little Criminals,” was published to international critical acclaim and was short-listed for the Orange Prize for Fictionbook. Her most recent work, “The Lonely Hearts Hotel,” was named one of the best books of 2017 by the San Francisco Chronicle and The Boston Globe. Born and raised in Montreal, O’Neill lives there today with her daughter.
Madeleine Thien’s novel “Do Not Say We Have Nothing” was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Award in 2016. She is also the author of the story collection “Simple Recipes” and the novels “Certainty” and “Dogs at the Perimeter,” the latter of which was shortlisted for Berlin’s International Literature Award and won the Frankfurt Book Fair’s 2015 LiBeraturpreis. Her books and stories have been translated into 23 languages. The daughter of Malaysian-Chinese immigrants to Canada, she lives in Montreal.
Spring 2018
Colloquium Series
Free | Open to Everyone
221 Kroeber Hall
Friday April 27, 5:00 PM
The Influence of Immigration on Tourism – The Case of Canada
Prof. Frederic Dimanche (Hospitality and Tourism Management, Ryerson University)
Co-Sponsored by the Tourism Studies Working Group
Colloquium events are free, and open to everyone. No ticket or RSVP is required.
The Canadian Studies Colloquium Series is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN Last Colloquium of the year! And Community events

Note this event later this week from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay area.


Canadian Studies Upcoming Events
Last Colloquium of the School Year:
Friday April 27
5:00 PM – Note Special Time!
Friday April 27, 5:00 PM
The Influence of Immigration on Tourism – The Case of Canada
Prof. Frederic Dimanche (Hospitality and Tourism Management, Ryerson University)
Co-Sponsored by the Tourism Studies Working Group
Over half of all immigrants in Canada settled in three major tourism destinations: Toronto, Vancouver and Montréal. Before the 1980s, Canada was welcoming over half of all immigrants and travellers from Europe and America. Now the share of these immigrants has decreased to under 30% as of 2016 and Asia has become over the years the main source of immigrants (over 48%). Mirroring this trend, tourist arrivals from Asia have increased while European arrivals stabilized. More specifically, the average growth in the number of Chinese tourists was almost 12% per year after 1990, and apart from the U.S., China now remains the top tourism market in Toronto and Vancouver, and it has a growing importance for tourism development in Montréal. Canada’s tourism sector has an employed labour force of over 1.7 million and almost 25% of these workers are immigrants or foreign workers. It is estimated that the demand for labour will increase to 2.29 million by 2035. However, the work force in the aging population will not be able to respond to that demand, and the role of immigrants in the job market will become more vital, especially in the metropolitan areas.
This study aims to determine the potential impacts of immigration on inbound tourism and on the Canadian labour market in cities by using secondary data. Statistical evidence strongly supports the hypothesis that immigration may be one of the major contributors to international travel flows and growth in the tourism sector.
223 Moses Hall
Colloquium events are free, and open to everyone. No ticket or RSVP is required.
The Canadian Studies Colloquium Series is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Community Events
Wednesday May 2, 11:30 AM Eastern
David Dodge CIFAR Lecture: Boundaries of Inclusion
Toronto, Ontario
Speaker: Professor Irene Bloemraad
Migration, Human Rights and National Values
While nationalism is growing around the world, record numbers of people are migrating beyond their country of birth. Increasingly, these migrants face hostility and discrimination by native-born citizens who see them as outsiders.
Ensuring that migrants are treated fairly is a human rights issue. Yet in Canada, the United States, and elsewhere, research suggests that the language of rights can harden attitudes towards migrants.
The 2018 David Dodge CIFAR Lecture is presented by Senior Fellow Irene Bloemraad of the program in Successful Societies at CIFAR. Dr. Bloemraad is a professor of Sociology and the Thomas Garden Barnes Chair of Canadian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Bloemraad will explore the complexities of framing and how we divide “us” from “them,” arguing that understanding and implementing the possibilities of inclusive nationalism is an urgent challenge in today’s world where some leaders are linking nationalism to policies that could close borders and drive further division.
Moderated by Elizabeth McIsaac, President of the Maytree Foundation, this lecture will be held in partnership with with Cities of Migration and the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants. Tickets are $15 and a light lunch is provided.
Wednesday May 2, 6:30 PM Pacific
Digital Moose Lounge Chesterfield Chat
Palo Alto, California
The Digital Moose Lounge is pleased to present our upcoming Chesterfield Chat event as part of our 2018 “Canadians Doing Good” series: Canadians Helping Immigrants in our Community.
Northern California is at the center of the national debate around immigration. Comprehensive Immigration Reform has stalled anew, and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program’s termination has created uncertainty for over 700,000 Dreamers. Meanwhile, rising anti-immigrant rhetoric and ICE raids have raised fears in our local immigrant communities. But behind the headlines, nonprofit lawyers continue to provide legal assistance to immigrants facing removal or seeking asylum before administrative tribunals and California courts. Hear our panel of local Canadians involved with immigrant legal services share their insights on how the current climate has affected their practice; what they have learned about our community; and how being Canadian has shaped their outlook.
April 28-29
Bay Area Book Festival, featuring several Canadian Writers
Berkeley, California
Katherena Vermette is a Métis writer from Treaty One territory in Winnipeg. Her first book, “North End Love Songs,” won the Governor General’s Award for Poetry. Her National Film Board short documentary, THIS RIVER, won the Coup de Coeur at the Montreal First Peoples’ Festival and a Canadian Screen Award. Her first novel, “The Break,” was a national bestseller in Canada and won the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award, the Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction, and the Carol Shields Winnipeg Book Award. “The Break” was shortlisted for a Governor General’s Literary Award, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and was a 2017 Canada Reads finalist.
Heather O’Neill is a novelist, poet, short-story writer, screenwriter, and essayist whose debut novel, “Lullabies for Little Criminals,” was published to international critical acclaim and was short-listed for the Orange Prize for Fictionbook. Her most recent work, “The Lonely Hearts Hotel,” was named one of the best books of 2017 by the San Francisco Chronicle and The Boston Globe. Born and raised in Montreal, O’Neill lives there today with her daughter.
Madeleine Thien’s novel “Do Not Say We Have Nothing” was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and won the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Award in 2016. She is also the author of the story collection “Simple Recipes” and the novels “Certainty” and “Dogs at the Perimeter,” the latter of which was shortlisted for Berlin’s International Literature Award and won the Frankfurt Book Fair’s 2015 LiBeraturpreis. Her books and stories have been translated into 23 languages. The daughter of Malaysian-Chinese immigrants to Canada, she lives in Montreal.
Spring 2018
Colloquium Series
Free | Open to Everyone
223 Moses Hall
Friday April 27, 5:00 PM
The Influence of Immigration on Tourism – The Case of Canada
Prof. Frederic Dimanche (Hospitality and Tourism Management, Ryerson University)
Co-Sponsored by the Tourism Studies Working Group
Colloquium events are free, and open to everyone. No ticket or RSVP is required.
The Canadian Studies Colloquium Series is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN Barnes Lecture Apr 13

Note this event later today from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay area.


Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture:April 13
Elizabeth May OC MP
Friday April 13, 3:00 PM
Can Canada claim climate leadership? Can the Paris Accord succeed in avoiding the worst of the climate crisis?
Speaker: Elizabeth May OC MP
Leader, Green Party of Canada
What role can Canada play to advance global climate goals, especially in 2018 as chair of the G7? As politics and governments change, Canada and the US have changed places, relatively speaking, on climate change. In Canada, global climate saboteur, former Prime Minister Stephen Harper, has been replaced by self-avowed climate champion, current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau; in the US, Barack Obama has been replaced by Donald Trump. As A.A. Milne wrote of Two Bad Bears, “All of a sudden, just like us, one got better and the other gut wus.”
Despite the fact that Canada’s total emissions are only 2% of the global total, as saboteur, Canada was more effective than the US has been under Trump. Prime Minister Trudeau has made less of an impact on Canada’s domestic policies than one would imagine. Canada has not changed our NDC (nationally determined contribution), our target filed with the UNFCCC. It remains the same as under the Conservatives. Where does this leave the Paris Accord and our global pact to ensure emissions are cut such that global average temperature does not exceed 1.5 degrees C above what they were before the Industrial Revolution?”
About the Speaker:
Elizabeth May is the Leader of the Green Party of Canada and its first elected Member of Parliament, representing Saanich-Gulf Islands in southern Vancouver Island. Elizabeth is an environmentalist, writer, activist and lawyer, who has a long record as a dedicated advocate — for social justice, for the environment, for human rights, and for pragmatic economic solutions.
Born in Connecticut, she moved to Nova Scotia with her family in 1973. Elizabeth grew up working in her family’s small business, a restaurant and gift shop on the Cabot Trail. She first became known in the Canadian media in the mid-1970s, through her leadership as a volunteer in the grassroots movement against proposed aerial insecticide spraying on forests near her home on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. Her efforts helped prevent aerial insecticide spraying from ever occurring in Nova Scotia.
Years later, she and a local group of residents went to court to prevent herbicide spraying. They won a temporary injunction in 1982 to hold off the spray programme, but after two years, the case was eventually lost. In the course of the litigation, her family sacrificed their home and seventy acres of land in an adverse court ruling to Scott Paper. However, by the time the judge ruled the chemicals were safe, the export of dangerous 2,4,5-T herbicides from the U.S had been banned. The forests of Nova Scotia were spared being the last areas in Canada to be sprayed with Agent Orange.
Her early volunteer work also included successful campaigns to prevent approval of uranium mining in Nova Scotia, and extensive work on energy policy issues, primarily opposing nuclear energy.
About the Event:
The 2018 Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture is presented by Canadian Studies and co-sponsored by the Institute of Governmental Studies. Talk from 3:00 to 4:30 PM, IGS Library, 109 Moses Hall. A reception will follow the lecture in 223 Moses Hall from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM. Free, and open to everyone. Registration is requested via Eventbrite.
109 Moses Hall (IGS Library)
RSVP Requested at
Co-Sponsored by the Institute of Governmental Studies
Spring 2018
Colloquium Series
Free | Open to Everyone
223 Moses Hall
Friday April 27, 5:00 PM
The Influence of Immigration on Tourism – The Case of Canada
Prof. Frederic Dimanche (Hospitality and Tourism Management, Ryerson University)
Co-Sponsored by the Tourism Studies Working Group
Colloquium events are free, and open to everyone. No ticket or RSVP is required.
The Canadian Studies Colloquium Series is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN Upcoming Events

From one of our fellow Canadian-focused Bay area organizations.


Canadian Studies Upcoming Events
Dear Friends of Canadian Studies,
Colloquium: March 21
Wednesday March 21, 12:00 Noon
Game Changers: Economics, Politics, and the Transformation of the Canadian Spectator Sport Business
Prof. Neil Longley (Economics & Management, University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
The lecture is based on research conducted for my forthcoming book, entitled Game Changers: Economics, Politics, and the Transformation of the Canadian Spectator Sport Business(University of British Columbia (UBC) Press, 2019).
The book examines the profound transformation that has occurred in the Canadian spectator sport business over the past half-century. It argues that this transformation should not be viewed in isolation, or only within the narrow context of sport, but rather should be viewed as a microcosm and manifestation of a complex set of economic, political and social changes that have occurred in broader Canadian society. It asserts that the freer movement of goods and services, globalization, immigration, urbanization, Quebec sovereignty, and western alienation, were all factors that impacted the Canadian sport industry.
Looked at another way, sport also reflects and mirrors these broader changes in society – in a sense, sport becomes a metaphor for the world around it. The nature of sport – with its high public visibility, relative transparency as a business, and its widespread following amongst large segments of the population – makes it a particularly unique vehicle to witness societal shifts and transformations.
223 Moses Hall
Colloquium events are free, and open to everyone. No ticket or RSVP is required.
The Canadian Studies Colloquium Series is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture:April 13
Elizabeth May OC MP
Friday APRIL 13, 3:00 PM
Can Canada claim climate leadership? Can the Paris Accord succeed in avoiding the worst of the climate crisis?
Speaker: Elizabeth May OC MP
Leader, Green Party of Canada
What role can Canada play to advance global climate goals, especially in 2018 as chair of the G7? As politics and governments change, Canada and the US have changed places, relatively speaking, on climate change. In Canada, global climate saboteur, former Prime Minister Stephen Harper, has been replaced by self-avowed climate champion, current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau; in the US, Barack Obama has been replaced by Donald Trump. As A.A. Milne wrote of Two Bad Bears, “All of a sudden, just like us, one got better and the other gut wus.”
Despite the fact that Canada’s total emissions are only 2% of the global total, as saboteur, Canada was more effective than the US has been under Trump. Prime Minister Trudeau has made less of an impact on Canada’s domestic policies than one would imagine. Canada has not changed our NDC (nationally determined contribution), our target filed with the UNFCCC. It remains the same as under the Conservatives. Where does this leave the Paris Accord and our global pact to ensure emissions are cut such that global average temperature does not exceed 1.5 degrees C above what they were before the Industrial Revolution?”
About the Speaker:
Elizabeth May is the Leader of the Green Party of Canada and its first elected Member of Parliament, representing Saanich-Gulf Islands in southern Vancouver Island. Elizabeth is an environmentalist, writer, activist and lawyer, who has a long record as a dedicated advocate — for social justice, for the environment, for human rights, and for pragmatic economic solutions.
Born in Connecticut, she moved to Nova Scotia with her family in 1973. Elizabeth grew up working in her family’s small business, a restaurant and gift shop on the Cabot Trail. She first became known in the Canadian media in the mid-1970s, through her leadership as a volunteer in the grassroots movement against proposed aerial insecticide spraying on forests near her home on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. Her efforts helped prevent aerial insecticide spraying from ever occurring in Nova Scotia.
Years later, she and a local group of residents went to court to prevent herbicide spraying. They won a temporary injunction in 1982 to hold off the spray programme, but after two years, the case was eventually lost. In the course of the litigation, her family sacrificed their home and seventy acres of land in an adverse court ruling to Scott Paper. However, by the time the judge ruled the chemicals were safe, the export of dangerous 2,4,5-T herbicides from the U.S had been banned. The forests of Nova Scotia were spared being the last areas in Canada to be sprayed with Agent Orange.
Her early volunteer work also included successful campaigns to prevent approval of uranium mining in Nova Scotia, and extensive work on energy policy issues, primarily opposing nuclear energy.
About the Event:
The 2018 Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture is presented by Canadian Studies and co-sponsored by the Institute of Governmental Studies. Talk from 3:00 to 4:30 PM, IGS Library, 109 Moses Hall. A reception will follow the lecture in 223 Moses Hall from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM. Free, and open to everyone. Registration is requested via Eventbrite.
109 Moses Hall (IGS Library)
RSVP Requested at
Co-Sponsored by the Institute of Governmental Studies
Spring 2018
Colloquium Series
Free | Open to Everyone
223 Moses Hall
Friday April 27, 5:00 PM
The Influence of Immigration on Tourism – The Case of Canada
Prof. Frederic Dimanche (Hospitality and Tourism Management, Ryerson University)
Co-Sponsored by the Tourism Studies Working Group
Colloquium events are free, and open to everyone. No ticket or RSVP is required.
The Canadian Studies Colloquium Series is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
9.98 GB (58%) of 17 GB used