Tag Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

Happy Canada Day from Berkeley! ūüá®ūüá¶

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Happy Canada Day!
Dear Michael,
On behalf of our team at Canadian Studies, I wish you and your family a wonderful Canada Day. Today, Canadians show our pride in our nation’s accomplishments, reflect on its history, and honor the values for which it stands in the modern world.
This year, I invite you to take this day to reflect on what defines Canada as a modern nation. Today’s Canada is a strong voice for democracy, human rights, and the acceptance of human diversity; it’s a country that defines itself through peacefulness and inclusivity. In a world that has in many ways seen substantial regression into authoritarianism and injustice in recent years, we believe that this example is more important than ever. As a program, we are proud to support research and scholarship that uplifts these values.
This year’s Canada Day celebrations are almost back to normal. Locally, there will be a flag-raising at San Francisco City Hall while our friends at the¬†Digital Moose Lounge¬†are hosting a (sold out!) Saturday picnic. For those in Canada, Canadian Heritage has¬†compiled a list¬†of celebrations happening across the country. And for those who can’t make it, the festivities in Ottawa will be¬†streamed live online. Whether you’re attending a festival or just barbecuing with the family in the backyard, we wish you a joyous celebration.
In friendship,
Irene Bloemraad
Director and Thomas G. Barnes Chair
Canadian Studies Program
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Bonne Saint-Jean √† nos amis du Qu√©bec! ‚öúÔłŹ

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Bonne Saint-Jean à tous!
Bonne Fête nationale à tous nos amis québécois et québécoises de la part du Programme d’études canadiennes de l’université de Californie Berkeley!
Celebrated on June 24, the¬†F√™te nationale, or¬†La Saint-Jean,¬†is the national holiday of Qu√©bec. The festival dates to 1834, when Qu√©bec¬†patriotes,¬†inspired by Irish-Canadian St. Patrick’s Day celebrations,¬†chose the Feast of St. John the Baptist as a day to celebrate the unique culture and heritage of the people of Qu√©bec.¬†The tradition continues 188 years later, inviting Quebeckers of all backgrounds to celebrate their love of their home province.
This term, Canadian Studies is sponsoring several graduate students doing exciting research in Québec, including Joshua Zimmt, who is studying fossils on Anticosti Island, and Jennifer Kaplan, investigating the development of gender-neutral French in Montréal. We also recently added Professor William Burton, an expert in French and Québécois literature, as a faculty affiliate.
Click¬†here¬†for¬†information about this year’s festivities (in French).¬†Bonne F√™te √† tous!
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

New faculty affiliate; a Canada-California climate partnership; Canada Day picnic

A newsletter from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In This Issue:
Program News
  • Canadian Studies welcomes immigration historian Hidetaka Hirota as newest faculty affiliate
US-Canada News
  • PM Trudeau and California Governor Newsom Sign Bilateral Agreement to Fight Climate Change
External Events
  • Canadian Consulate at SF Pride
  • DML Throwback Canada Day Picnic
PROGRAM NEWS
Canadian Studies welcomes immigration historian Hidetaka Hirota as newest faculty affiliate
Canadian Studies is pleased to announce that Hidetaka Hirota, an associate professor in the Department of History, has joined our program as our newest faculty affiliate.
Professor Hirota is a historian of the United States, specializing in immigration history. His first book, Expelling the Poor, examines the origins of US immigration policy, based on a study of the deportation of impoverished Irish immigrants from the United States to Canada and Europe in the mid-nineteenth century. His current project is titled The American Dilemma, and traces the history of U.S. policy for restricting the immigration of foreign contract workers from Canada, Asia, Mexico, and Europe between the 1880s and 1920s.
Professor Hirota is new to UC Berkeley, having joined the faculty earlier this spring. He received his bachelor’s degree in foreign studies at Sophia University in Tokyo, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in history from Boston Collge. In the fall, he will teach a seminar on the history of American immigration law and policy.
US-CANADA NEWS
PM Trudeau and California Governor Newsom Sign Bilateral Agreement to Fight Climate Change
Earlier this month, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met with California governor Gavin Newsom at the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, an international forum designed to promote cooperation among the nations of the Western Hemisphere. The meeting, which focused on climate change, culminated with the signing a new¬†climate partnership¬†between Canada and California that outlines shared policy objectives. The resulting plan was hailed by both leaders as a “bold” step towards advancing climate solutions and strengthening the natural ties between Canada and California.
The meeting was a natural point of connection for Trudeau and Newsom, both of whom have placed climate change at the centre of their political agendas. Both Canada and California are seen as global leaders in the fight against climate change, and Newsom stressed that partnership would endure independent of changes in US national politics.
During the meeting, the two leaders emphasized Canada and California’s many shared values, including diversity and inclusivity. The two leaders also noted the importance of including Indigenous peoples in environmental discussions, recognizing their “essential” role in land stewardship at a time where both Canada and California are attempting to address painful historical legacies with their Indigenous populations.
The Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) which resulted from the meeting included several actionable goals, including reducing pollution, eliminating plastic waste, promoting zero-emission vehicles, and protecting the environment. Wildfires, which have increased in frequency and ferocity along the Pacific Coast in recent years, were another area of shared concern. The full text of the Memorandum can be viewed here.
Photo: Office of the Governor of California.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Canadian Consulate at the SF Pride Parade
Sunday, June 26 | San Francisco, CA
Consul General of Canada Rana Sarkar cordially invites you to join Canadians marching in the 2022 San Francisco Pride Parade for the first time in three years! The theme of this year’s parade is “Love Will Keep Us Together.” All are welcome to join us on Sunday, June 26th with their families and friends to celebrate diversity and to support the LGBTQ2+ members of our communities here in San Francisco, at home in Canada, and abroad.
DML Throwback Canada Day Picnic
Saturday, July 2 | 11:30 am | Woodside, CA | Buy tickets
The Digital Moose Lounge invites you to join your fellow Northern California Canadians for a throwback Canada Day picnic. This event will bring together a diverse community, from the Consulate of Canada in SF, government, tech, culture, sports and entertainment. Meet new SF Bay Canadians and reconnect with old friends while celebrating Canada Day at the family-friendly picnic!
Enjoy a tasty Flamin Dog BBQ plate, cold Canadian beers, wine tasting with Kascadia Wine Merchants, snacks and Kona Ice snow cones!
Activities will include crafts, trivia, street hockey, beanbag toss, water balloons, tug o’ war, a donut-eating contest and more surprises! Prizes will include 2 Air Canada tickets to anywhere in Canada for one lucky raffle winner. Author Jocelyn Watkinson will also read from her children’s book¬†The Three Canadian Pigs: A Hockey Story.
Tickets are $25 for adults and $10 for children, and can be purchased here.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

New Hildebrand Fellow studies non-binary French; Queen’s Jubilee; Are appeals to rights effective?

A newsletter from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In This Issue:
Program News
  • New Hildebrand Fellow, Jennifer Kaplan, studies development of gender-neutral French in Quebec
  • Director Bloemraad and Nicholas A. R. Fraser present new research on limitations of rights-based persuasion
News from Canada
  • Canada celebrates Platinum Jubilee, reflects on monarchy’s past & future
External Events
  • DML Throwback Canada Day Picnic
PROGRAM NEWS
New Hildebrand Fellow, Jennifer Kaplan, Studies Development of Gender-Neutral French in Quebec
This Pride Month, Canadian Studies is pleased to welcome a new Hildebrand Fellow who will contribute to our understanding of the diversity of human gender and sexuality: Jennifer Kaplan, a doctoral student in romance languages and literatures. Her research focuses on sociolinguistics, with a particular focus on grammatical gender and queer linguistics.
Jennifer‚Äôs Hildebrand Fellowship will fund her research into how non-binary or gender variant Francophone Canadians grapple with the dualistic grammatical gender inherent in French (masculine and feminine). Specifically, she seeks to document the emergence of new grammatical gender markers and neo-pronouns as used by gender non-conforming people in Quebec. She will also explore how Quebec’s complicated relationship with Anglophone Canada has complicated attitudes towards non-binary French today. Jennifer’s fellowship will support her for six months of fieldwork in Montreal, where she will conduct ethnographic fieldwork while attending classes at the Universit√© de Montr√©al.
Jennifer holds a B.A. in comparative literature from Barnard College and a B.A. and M.A. in English and comparative literature from Columbia University. She is currently also working on the Corpus of New York City English (CoNYCE) project, which examines New Yorker’s attitudes towards the classic “New York accent”.
Director Bloemraad and Nicholas A. R. Fraser Present New Research on Limitations of Rights-Based Persuasion
Canadian Studies director Irene Bloemraad and Sproul Fellow Nicholas A. R. Fraser spoke Friday at the annual meeting of the Canadian Political Science Association, as part of a session titled “National Identities and Values: New Research on their Roles in Supporting and Relating to Others”. Their presentation discussed their unpublished paper, “Categorical Inequalities and the Framing of Positive and Negative Rights: National Values versus Human Rights”. The paper was co-authored by Allison Harell, a professor at the Universit√© du Qu√©bec √† Montr√©al who joined them for the panel. Former Sproul Fellow Rebecca Wallace, now a professor at St. Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia, also contributed to the project.
The research itself looks at how Canadians draw boundaries around who is entitled to civil and social rights. It looks at both “negative rights” (a protection from government action, such as state violence) and positive rights (access to a government benefit, such as healthcare or other welfare state provisions). While the former category are typically considered “universal” human rights, the latter are usually reserved for citizens and are not generally regarded as human rights. The research examines how and when Canadians perceive instances of rights violations in these contexts; it also asks whether framing these rights in terms of “national values” or “universal human rights” creates a more effective frame for prompting recognition of violations. Finally, it explores these questions through a lens at the intersection of race and citizenship, asking how these factors address the recognition and redress of rights violations.
Their findings, based on survey data from thousands of Canadians, suggest that framing rights in terms of national values is effective at promoting recognition of positive rights, but that it does not encourage people to be more generous in expanding access to such rights. Appeals to human rights had little effect on participants. Racial differences were also apparent, as a problem of food insecurity was most likely to be recognized and a remedy accepted by survey takers when the recipient was portrayed as a white citizen. Conversely, violations of civil rights, measured by reactions to arbitrary police stops, raised more concern when the person being stopped was described as a Black citizen, but not if they were a visa overstayer from Haiti or Jamaica, or a white citizen.
Professor Bloemraad underscores, “The findings from this research clearly reveal the limits of rights-based appeals, even appeals to human rights. And they demonstrate, in the minds of the Canadian public, continuing inequality in people’s access to various rights.”
NEWS FROM CANADA
Canada Celebrates Queen’s Platinum Jubilee, Reflects on Monarchy’s Past and Future
People across Canada gathered over the weekend to celebrate¬†Queen Elizabeth’s¬†70th anniversary as Queen of Canada. Few Canadians now remember a time before Elizabeth, who ascended the throne in 1952. But in her seven decades on the throne, Canada has undergone enormous change, and this Jubilee has many wondering what the¬†future holds¬†for their nation’s monarchy.
The 96-year-old Elizabeth is the world’s oldest living sovereign, and holds several world records for the length of her reign. Elizabeth is first British or Canadian monarch to reach 70 years on the throne. She has surpassed the second-longest reign, that of Queen Victoria, by almost seven years. In just six days, she will overtake King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand for the second-longest reign in history. And in two years, she will take first place from the longest-reigning sovereign in recorded history, King Louis XIV of France, who ruled for 72 years. That monarch has his own important place in Canadian history for his role in establishing the Province of New France.
While the largest Jubilee celebrations were of course held in London, provinces and municipalities across Canada also held their own festivities, including parades, fireworks, and light shows. The Government of Canada provided grants of $2.14 million for over 360 Jubilee community improvement projects. A chief focus was on tree-plantings, part of the¬†Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy¬†initiative, meant to increase and improve the quality of forest coverage across the world. The city of Toronto, for instance, planted 70 large trees in Rowntree Mills Park, one for each year of Elizabeth’s reign.
Nevertheless, official recognition of the anniversary at the federal level has been more muted than previous jubilees. Governor General Mary Simon traveled to London, where she participated in several ceremonies and met with other Indigenous leaders from the Commonwealth. But to¬†monarchists’ chagrin, there were¬†few official ceremonies¬†in Canada, and while the Government released a commemorative coin and stamp, they declined to award Jubilee medals, a longstanding tradition honoring Canadians for outstanding acts of service.
Political scientists say this demonstrates Canada’s often-ambivalent attitude towards the monarchy. Ever since Canada began to develop a distinct national identity in the years after WWI, the role of the monarchy and Canada’s ties to Britain have been a relationship in transition. This is especially true in recent years, where many have called for a re-examination of Canada’s colonial legacies. Moreover, while the Queen remains personally popular, for some the very idea of “royalty” runs counter to what they consider Canada’s egalitarian ideals. Though the monarchy is sure to continue in Canada for the time being, it remains to be seen whether Prince Charles, who quietly visited Canada for a Royal Tour of Canada last month, can replicate his mother’s successes.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
DML Throwback Canada Day Picnic
Saturday, July 2 | 11:30 am | Woodside, CA | Buy tickets
The Digital Moose Lounge invites you to join your fellow Northern California Canadians for a throwback Canada Day picnic. This event will bring together a diverse community, from the Consulate of Canada in SF, government, tech, culture, sports and entertainment. Meet new SF Bay Canadians and reconnect with old friends while celebrating Canada Day at the family-friendly picnic!
Enjoy a tasty Flamin Dog BBQ plate, cold Canadian beers, wine tasting with Kascadia Wine Merchants, snacks and Kona Ice snow cones!
Activities will include crafts, trivia, street hockey, beanbag toss, water balloons, tug o’ war, a donut-eating contest and more surprises! Prizes will include 2 Air Canada tickets to anywhere in Canada for one lucky raffle winner. Author Jocelyn Watkinson will also read from her children’s book¬†The Three Canadian Pigs: A Hockey Story.
Tickets are $25 for adults and $10 for children, and can be purchased here.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Reimagining a BC Museum; Fulbright in Canada grants

A newsletter from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.  And we thank the folks at the Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley for their continued support.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In This Issue:
In the News
  • Royal BC Museum slated for almost $1 billion overhaul
Grant opportunity
  • Fulbright Research Chairs in Canada
External Events
  • Memorial Day Service
IN THE NEWS
Royal BC Museum Slated for Almost $1 Billion Overhaul
The Royal BC Museum in Victoria will receive a major overhaul under a new proposal by the government of British Columbia. On May 13, premier John Horgan¬†announced¬†a $789 million grant to completely rebuild the complex at its current site by 2030. The project – the most expensive museum in Canadian history – has drawn fierce criticism, yet proponents argue that the redevelopment isn’t just a practical necessity – it’s a moral one.
The provincial government contends that the project is¬†long overdue. The museum is one of British Columbia’s most popular attractions, drawing almost a million visitors a year before the pandemic. However, the current buildings, which date to 1968, have been deemed seismically unsafe and inadequate by modern conservation standards. The government has already made plans to move the BC Provincial Archives, previously housed in the museum, to a new, $224 million building outside Victoria due to the risk of flooding at the current site.
Practical concerns aside, project leaders also see an opportunity to build a more inclusive museum in the spirit of Indigenous reconciliation. Tourism minister Melanie Mark said the new museum will take the “diverse stories of British Columbians and Indigenous peoples out of the shadows and into the light”. Indigenous activists have long insisted that museums recognize the colonialist intent of their collections, and make museum spaces more welcoming to Indigenous visitors and other minority groups.
The Royal BC Museum is considered a leader in this space, and has already undergone several major changes in recent years. In 2021, the museum released a “Report to British Columbians” apologizing for the institution’s colonial history and announcing a new curatorial policy that elevates Indigenous voices and prioritizes object repatriations.
Last semester, Canadian Studies hosted a discussion with two of the Indigenous cultural experts at the forefront of efforts to “decolonize” the collection. Lou-Ann Neel helped develop the museum’s¬†Indigenous Repatriation Handbook, and overseas efforts to return cultural goods to their tribes of origin. Meanwhile, Michelle Washington has spearheaded plans for a “living museum” that includes present-day Indigenous societies. Thanks to efforts like theirs, the new museum will include Indigenous ceremonial and cultural spaces, where sacred and ritual objects can be used for their intended purpose.
The museum has already begun dismantling exhibits deemed to promote colonialism, beginning with its historical collections and widely-criticized exhibits on Indigenous societies in the province. In January, it also permanently closed the “Becoming B.C.” exhibit, which centered on interactive, walk-through sets showing life in a 19th-century BC town. The exhibit’s narrative was argued to privilege the history of European settlers over other groups. The exhibit will eventually be replaced by one that covers the diversity of BC’s many Native and immigrant inhabitants.
The museum is slated to close in September, and will remain shut for most of the next decade, with a projected completion date of 2030 at the earliest. However, the museum will continue to stage travelling exhibitions from its permanent collection.
GRANT OPPORTUNITY
Fulbright Research Chairs in Canada
Deadline: September 15, 2022
Fulbright Canada is accepting applications for more than 50 Fulbright Research Chairs at top Canadian institutions. These grants are available to US scholars, and support research with Canadian colleagues for a four to nine month period. Awards are available with start dates of September 2023 and January 2024.
Applicants can apply for awards in several categories.
  • 4-month¬†Research Chairs¬†are available in multiple categories across various disciplines
  • 9-month¬†Distinguished Chairs¬†are offered by Carleton University to scholars with 10 years of experience in the topics of arts and social sciences; public affairs; entrepreneurship and social innovation; and environmental science.
  • Postdoctoral research awards¬†provide funding to promising new scholars to establish a research base
Please note these awards are only open to US citizens. Click here to see full application requirements and procedures.
Interested applicants are encouraged to sign up for the webinar “Preparing a Successful Application for a Fulbright in Canada“, scheduled for 12 pm PT on June 8.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Memorial Day Service
Sunday, May 29 | 11:00 am PT | Colma | RSVP here
Join Branch 25 of the Royal Canadian Legion, representing the San Francisco Bay Area, for their annual Memorial Day Service, supported by the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (USNSCC) Arkansas Division. The service will take place at the Royal Canadian Legion plot in Greenlawn Cemetery at 1100 El Camino Real in Colma.
This event will be webcast live; if you are unable to attend in person and wish to view the online stream, please register above.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720