Tag Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

CAN Announcements

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Next Week: Knowledge Borders: Temporary Labor Mobility and the Canada–US Border Region, feat. Prof. Kathrine Richardson
Lecture | March 3 | 12:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall
Key elements of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) deal with temporary labor mobility, and should ideally make the temporary movement of professionals easier across the border of all NAFTA countries. However, this is arguably not the case in emerging sectors such as high technology. Dr. Richardson’s book, Knowledge Borders: Temporary Labor Mobility and the Canada-US Border Region, examines the movement of technology professionals across the Canada-U.S. border, focusing on Vancouver, Seattle, and the San Francisco Bay Area. It asks whether current policy is an impediment to the development of high-tech clusters, and presents new models and policy approaches for the development of an innovation cross-border region.
Kathrine E. Richardson is an associate professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at San José State University. Her research specializes in the mobility and retention of highly skilled professionals, and how they influence the development of urban systems. She received her Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia in 2006, and did a post-doc at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. In addition to teaching, Dr. Richardson is currently working on her second book.
Plus: Two Additional Talks Coming March 10 & 17!
We’re excited to announce that Canadian Studies will be adding two special lectures to our colloquium in March, featuring the two finalists for our postdoctoral competition. We’ll be sending out a special announcement soon, so stay tuned for more information!
March 12: Get Ready to Give Big!
The Big Give, Berkeley’s annual day of giving, is approaching fast. On March 12, show your support for Canadian Studies by giving a gift of any size online. And this year, your gift could help us win thousands of dollars in special contest prizes – at no extra cost to you!
Want to learn more? We’ll follow up with how you can help as the big day gets closer, but you can click here for a preview of the contests. We hope you’ll join us then!
Cosponsored Event: Register for Housing Justice Conference at UC Berkeley, March 13-15
NOTICE: Please do not forward this invitation or otherwise share it. Attendance is limited and we’d like to privilege participation among community organizers, policymakers, students and faculty in sponsoring departments, and those actively working issues of housing justice.
We are excited to open up registration for attending “Power at the Margins II: Mobilizing Across Housing Injustice.” The gathering will bring together over 140 scholars and community organizers working on issues of housing justice from across the Bay Area, US, and other countries in discussion across 25 sessions.
Seeking a change in the current scenario where academia, activists, and practitioners perform separately, our goal is to create a dedicated space for all who engage in work at the margins of traditional housing to come together. Sessions will address a range of issues including:
· Defending and expanding affordable housing
· Legal, civil, and human rights struggles of housing and homelessness
· Intersections and alliances between housing justice and other movements including labor, health, environmental, gender, and racial justice.
· Solidarity, lessons, and collaborations between academia and community organizing
The event will take place at Wurster Hall on the UC Berkeley campus. The gathering will commence with a plenary panel “Defending Housing” Friday, March 13 5:30 – 7pm. It will then continue with full days of sessions on Saturday and conclude Sunday, March 15 at 1:30pm. For the schedule and list of panels and participants click here.
Registration is free, but limited. We encourage you to register ASAP to secure a spot. Registration is for the full day of sessions on Saturday and/or Sunday. We hope you will be able to join for both. The Friday evening plenary does not require registration and is open to the public. Click here to register!
Event Report: Mental Health and Refugees: The Eritrean Case
Earlier this month, our friends at the Center for African Studies organized a great event on mental health care for Eritrean refugees in Canada. The event, “Mental Health and Refugees: The Eritrean Case”, was co-sponsored by the Canadian Studies Program, and featured Yohannes Ferdinado Drar, a social worker at the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Center.
Mr. Drar spoke about his work with Eritrean refugees in Canada, and the particular challenges they face. The event attracted a diverse audience of over 60 people, including students, faculty, and members of the local Eritrean community. It generated a lively discussion, and attendees offered many insightful questions and comments. Students showed particularly high interest in the subject.
The event also introduced many to the beauty of Eritrean culture, as attendees were treated to a coffee ceremony including traditional coffee, himbasha (Eritrean soft bread) and popcorn.
Events From Our Friends at the Canadian Consulate
March 3: Vishtèn at Freight & Salvage
Musical performance | 8:00 p.m.
Freight & Salvage, 2020 Addison St, Berkeley
For close to fifteen years, the Acadian trio Vishtèn has dazzled audiences with its fiery blend of traditional French songs and original instrumentals that fuse Celtic and Acadian genres with a modern rock sensibility and indie-folk influences. Lauded as “traditional but fiercely up-to-the-moment” (Penguin Eggs), this band from Canada’s east coast has been recognized as an ambassador of Francophone culture around the world.
Click here for tickets and more information.
March 24: Techplomacy: Global Leaders Wrestling with Big Tech
Panel discussion | 6:00 p.m. | Manny’s, 3092 16th St, San Francisco
The effects of unchecked technology growth have become apparent in the wake of major political events, privacy breaches, and social transformations. We need to make sure that our democracy sets boundaries for the tech industry—and not the other way around.
In a town hall-style panel discussion, techplomacy leaders from Canada, Switzerland, and Denmark will be available to answer questions and take suggestions about how governments can (or should) use tech policy to shape the future of our societies.
Click here for tickets and more information.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

 

CAN Announcements

A newsletter from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Next Week: Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture:
Maps, Indigenous Territory, and the Problem of Anachronism, feat. Prof. Richard A. Rhodes
Lecture | February 11 | 12:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall
The annual Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture will take place next Tuesday, February 11. The speaker will be Canadian Studies Program co-director, Professor Richard A. Rhodes.
One of the more problematic tasks in studying the geography of language is charting shifts in the location of minority languages. Societies speaking threatened languages are often also under territorial pressures. Maps by experts have implications well beyond their best take on history, and the indigenous peoples of North America provide some of the most cogent examples. In this talk, Professor Rhodes will address several examples of First Nations/Native American people that highlight some of these problems.
Canadian Studies welcomes Rosann Greenspan
The Canadian Studies program is excited to welcome our newest advisory board member, Dr. Rosann Greenspan. Born and raised in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Dr. Greenspan graduated with her B.A. magna cum laude in Yale University’s first class of undergraduate women. She earned an M.A. from the Centre for Criminology at the University of Toronto, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in the interdisciplinary Jurisprudence & Social Policy Program in U.C. Berkeley School of Law.
In addition to her almost 20 years at Berkeley’s Center for the Study of Law and Society, where she was executive director until her retirement in 2019, she has held positions as research officer at the Law Reform Commission of Canada, postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, US Supreme Court fellow, research director at the Police Foundation in Washington, DC, and lecturer in Legal Studies at U.C. Berkeley, inter alia. Besides Ontario, where she returns regularly, she has also lived in Quebec and British Columbia, and briefly in the Yukon. Her most recent publication is the edited volume, The Legal Process and the Promise of Justice: Studies Inspired by the Work of Malcolm Feeley, edited by Rosann Greenspan, Hadar Aviram and Jonathan Simon (Cambridge University Press, 2019).
Postdoctoral Opportunity in Canadian Studies at UC Berkeley
The Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley is accepting applications for a one-year post-doc position with a focus on immigration and Canadian politics. Please help us spread the word to anyone you think might be interested!
This is a 12-month, 100% time position, beginning August 1, 2020. 80% of the holder’s time will be dedicated to projects developed in collaboration with the Thomas Garden Barnes Chair of Canadian Studies; 20% of the holder’s time is reserved for their own research and writing. There is no teaching obligation.
The successful candidate will oversee the fielding of online surveys of Canadian attitudes on immigration, and help advance possible parallel surveys in the United States and other immigrant-receiving countries. Other projects will leverage the postdoctoral scholar’s interests and strengths, ideally complementing the Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative’s Mapping Spatial Inequality project and/or the focus of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research’s new Boundaries, Membership and Belonging program.
We hope to fill this position quickly. Applications will be accepted until February 17, 2020. The maximum annualized salary direct-paid by Berkeley for this position is $60,000, with a comprehensive benefits package. Salary will be determined commensurate with qualifications, experience and campus policy.
Co-sponsored Event: Mental Health and Refugees: The Eritrean Case
Lecture | February 7 | 5:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall
Speaker/Performer: Yohannes Ferdinando Drar, The Royal
Mental health problems and suicide are two challenges facing the Eritrean community. The denial of basic rights in Eritrea and subsequent difficulties experienced during migration, while claiming asylum, and when integrating into new cultures in destination countries continue to affect migrants. As a result, many Eritrean refugees suffer from poor mental health, and a high suicide rate among Eritrean refugees in Canada and the U.S.
Yohannes Ferdinando Drar came to Canada in the 80’s as refugee from Eritrea. He attained his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in social work from Carleton University in Ottawa, and has since worked as a mental health social worker at Royal Ottawa Hospital. He is a strong advocate for refugees’ mental health issues, a community activist, and organizer. His passion remains to integrate new immigrants and refugees into their host country.
For more information, click here.
Crossing Borders: A Multi-Disciplinary Student Conference
Conference | March 6-7 | Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada
The Centre for Canadian Studies at Brock University will be hosting the Crossing Borders conference on March 6 and 7. The deadline for abstract submission is February 14, with February 21 being the deadline to submit complete papers to be considered for the Best Paper award. The keynote address will follow the conference banquet on Friday, March 6, and will highlight Dr. Andrew Holman, editor of the American Review of Canadian Studies and professor of history/director of Canadian Studies for Bridgewater University. His talk is entitled “Hockey Talk: Sport, Communications, and a History of Getting it Wrong.”
Please submit abstracts to canadianstudies@brocku.ca.
Conference and keynote registration: crossingborders2020.eventbrite.ca
Events From Our Friends at the Canadian Consulate
March 3: Vishtèn at Freight & Salvage
Musical performance | 8:00 p.m. | Freight & Salvage, 2020 Addison St, Berkeley
For close to fifteen years, the Acadian trio Vishtèn has dazzled audiences with its fiery blend of traditional French songs and original instrumentals that fuse Celtic and Acadian genres with a modern rock sensibility and indie-folk influences. Lauded as “traditional but fiercely up-to-the-moment” (Penguin Eggs), this band from Canada’s east coast has been recognized as an ambassador of Francophone culture around the world.
Click here for tickets and more information.
March 24: Techplomacy: Global Leaders Wrestling with Big Tech
Panel discussion | 6:00 p.m. | Manny’s, 3092 16th St, San Francisco
The effects of unchecked technology growth have become apparent in the wake of major political events, privacy breaches, and social transformations. We need to make sure that our democracy sets boundaries for the tech industry—and not the other way around.
In a town hall-style panel discussion, techplomacy leaders from Canada, Switzerland, and Denmark will be available to answer questions and take suggestions about how governments can (or should) use tech policy to shape the future of our societies.
Click here for tickets and more information.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

 

CAN Announcements

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Postdoctoral Opportunity in Canadian Studies at UC Berkeley
The Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley is excited to announce that we’ve been approved for a one-year post-doc position with a focus on immigration and Canadian politics. Please help us spread the word to anyone you think might be interested!
This is a 12-month, 100% time position, beginning August 1, 2020. 80% of the holder’s time will be dedicated to projects developed in collaboration with the Thomas Garden Barnes Chair of Canadian Studies; 20% of the holder’s time is reserved for their own research and writing. There is no teaching obligation.
The successful candidate will oversee the fielding of online surveys of Canadian attitudes on immigration, and help advance possible parallel surveys in the United States and other immigrant-receiving countries. Other projects will leverage the postdoctoral scholar’s interests and strengths, ideally complementing the Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative’s Mapping Spatial Inequality project and/or the focus of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research’s new Boundaries, Membership and Belonging program.
We hope to fill this position quickly. Our first review will be January 30, 2020, but applications will be accepted until February 17, 2020. The maximum annualized salary direct-paid by Berkeley for this position is $60,000, with a comprehensive benefits package. Salary will be determined commensurate with qualifications, experience and campus policy.
Canadian Studies welcomes Tomás Lane
On January 6, Tomás Lane joined the Canadian Studies Program as the new Program Coordinator. Tomás earned his B.A. in history from UC Berkeley, with a focus on post-WWII population exchanges in the German-Polish borderlands. As an undergraduate, he worked in the Institute for European Studies for two years and participated in a study abroad program in three countries.
Tomás has continued to work at Berkeley since graduation, most recently in the Deans’ Office of the College of Letters & Science, where he coordinated events and fundraising for undergraduate programs. Tomás’ interests include patterns of cultural exchange and migration, as well as how the interpretation of history informs current political movements.
Contact info:
Save the Date: Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture, Feb. 11, feat. Prof. Richard A. Rhodes
Please save the date for the annual Thomas Garden Barnes Lecture on Tuesday, February 11. The lecture will take place at 12:30 p.m. in 223 Moses Hall.
The speaker will be Canadian Studies Program co-director, Professor Richard A. Rhodes.
Cosponsored Event: Mental Health and Refugees: The Eritrean Case
Lecture | February 7 | 5:30-7:30 p.m. | 223 Moses Hall
Speaker/Performer: Yohannes Ferdinando Drar, The Royal
Mental health problems and suicide are two challenges facing the Eritrean community. The collective multi-generational trauma Eritreans experience is a direct result of continuous wars and human right violations committed by the current government. The denial of basic rights in Eritrea and subsequent difficulties experienced during migration, while claiming asylum, and integrating into new cultures in destination countries continue to affect migrants. As a result, many Eritrean refugees suffer from poor mental health, and the suicide rate continues to rise among Eritrean refugees in Canada and the U.S.
Yohannes Ferdinando Drar came to Canada in the 80’s as refugee from Eritrea. After arriving in Canada, he attained his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Social Work from Carleton University in Ottawa. He has since been working as a Mental Health Social Worker at Royal Ottawa Hospital. He is a strong advocate for refugees’ mental health issues, a community activist, and organizer. His passion remains to integrate new immigrants and refugees into their host country.
For more information, click here.
Cross-Border Research Fellowship: Now accepting applications for 2020/2021
The Border Policy Research Institute at Western Washington University and the Borders in Globalization SSHRC Research Program at the Centre for Global Studies at the University of Victoria are now accepting applications for a Visiting Research Fellow in 2020/2021. The fellowship is designed for emerging scholars and policy professionals. This joint appointment between two universities with established border studies programs offers a unique opportunity to conduct cross-border, policy-relevant research in the Cascadia border region. Fellowship applicants can request up to 3-month residencies, based at Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington, and/or at the University of Victoria in Victoria, British Columbia.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

 

Happy Boxing Day from Canadian Studies

An item we received yesterday from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.  We thank the Canadian Studies Program at University of California, Berkeley for featuring the Royal Canadian Legion so prominently.  Our partnership over the past few years has been one that we have cherished.


Happy Boxing Day from Canadian Studies
Greetings and happy holidays! On behalf of the Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley, we are sending highlights from our 2019 activities, and asking you to join us in supporting the Program as the year comes to a close.
This fall, Canadian Studies hosted an exciting series of events related to the 2019 Canadian Federal Election. We kicked things off in October, hosting an election Debate Party amid the Halloween decorations. After the event, UC Berkeley student Pascal García-Monpetit was interviewed live from Ottawa by Canadian Public Affairs Channel (CPAC). The next day, renowned University of British Columbia professor Richard Johnston gave a Colloquium presentation titled “Understanding the Canadian Federal Election Campaign.”
Then, on Election Night, Canadian Studies hosted an Election Results Watch Party on campus, featuring a delicious tray of Montreal Smoked Meat. Over 60 guests attended, including Berkeley students, local Canadian expats, and wayward Canadian travelers who found us on Google. The next day, our election marathon came to a thoughtful close with Dr. Eric Guntermann’s Colloquium talk offering a “Post-Mortem” of election results.
The Columbia River Treaty, which the U.S. and Canada are renegotiating, was a highlight of our 2019 research efforts. Last Spring, Canadian Studies Affiliated Professor G. Mathias “Matt” Kondolf organized a workshop on Adaptive Management and the Future of the Columbia River Treaty. Two dozen scientists, legal experts, and First Nations leaders assembled in Berkeley to discuss smarter biological management strategies of this international river, and composed a resolution urging the binational negotiating team to incorporate these practices into a modernized Treaty. In December, UC Berkeley Hildebrand Fellow Tyler Nodine delivered a Colloquium talk summarizing the group’s work on this important topic.
The 3rd Annual Canadian Family Thanksgiving was co-hosted at UC-Berkeley’s Alumni House by Canadian Studies and the Digital Mouse Lounge. Over 100 guests enjoyed a night of Canadian food, entertainment, and community. The event also kicked off the Royal Canadian Legion US Zone Branch 25 (SF Bay Area)’s 2019 Poppy Campaign in support of veterans. Canadian Studies proudly served as an official Poppy Distribution Point through Remembrance Day.
Canadian Studies also supported the research of four outstanding UC Berkeley Graduate Students this year through our Edward Hildebrand Fellowship, which supports graduate students traveling to Canada to conduct original research on Canadian topics. Current Hildebrand Fellow Julie Gorecki is researching the worldwide links between gender and climate change, with a specific focus on Indigenous women in Canada. Recent Hildebrand Fellows are now teaching at Yale and the University of the Fraser Valley, supporting the next generation of students.
Since 1982, the Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley has played a vital role in advancing knowledge of Canada, while serving as a hub for the Canadian community in Northern California and intellectual thought on Canada-U.S. affairs. Looking ahead to 2020, our Faculty leadership and Advisory Board have set a goal of further advancing new Canadianist research. To that end, we are putting out a special call for donations to support a U.S.-Canada postdoc with expertise in migration. This will mark the first time that Canadian Studies will host a postdoc, and we are confident that this effort will raise the profile of Canadian research at Berkeley, and complement other Canadian Studies programs like our Hildebrand and Sproul fellowships. We are excited to support this new initiative, and are ourselves pledging 25% more than last year’s giving to support Canadian Studies in attaining this goal. We rely on donations for over 90% of our budget, and your donations are very likely tax deductible.*
We wish you a happy holiday season, and remain grateful for your ongoing support.
Sincerely,
David Stewart & Pavan Dhillon
Fundraising Co-Chairs
*UC Berkeley is a Revenue Canada Prescribed University and an Internal Revenue Service 501(c)(3) nonprofit, so contributions made to Canadian Studies max be tax-deductible on American and Canadian federal income taxes (consult your tax professional).
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

 

CAN Announcements

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies News & Events
Next Colloquium
December 10, 2019
Tyler Nodine, UC Berkeley
Tuesday December 10, 12:30 PM, 223 Moses Hall
Colloquium: Speaker – Tyler Nodine, UC Berkeley Graduate Student & Hildebrand Fellow with Canadian Studies
Modernizing the Columbia River Treaty:
The role of adaptive management in an international water management agreement
The Columbia River Treaty (CRT) is a nearly 60-year-old agreement between the U.S and Canada that has been recognized globally as a model for international cooperation on hydropower and flood control objectives. However, the treaty has also had detrimental social and environmental implications. Now the Treaty is being renegotiated and adaptive management may help optimize multiple objectives in the face of an uncertain climate future. This talk will cover a brief history of the Columbia basin, benefits and impacts of the original CRT agreement, and possible future directions of the Treaty. Tyler will also share insights from a workshop on adaptive management hosted by the Canadian Studies Program in spring 2019 and introduce his current research focused on managing CRT reservoirs for ecosystem function.
This event is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Courtesy Forwards
Fulbright Canada-Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellowship Program
Joint Chair in Contemporary Public Policy
About our Partner:
The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation supports advanced research in the Social Sciences and Humanities while offering audacious, cutting-edge doctoral students the opportunity to develop skills as engaged leaders with meaningful impact in their institutions and communities.
The Foundation is interested in scholars that undertake research in the Social Sciences and Humanities and under four themes:
  • Human Rights and Dignity,
  • Responsible Citizenship,
  • Canada and the World, and
  • People and their Natural Environment.
Benefits
  • $25,000 for a 4-month residential exchange at the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada (MISC) based at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec
  • Access to Fulbright Canada and Trudeau Foundation active and alumni communities and resources
  • Additional allowance of up to CDN $15,000 for research, travel and networking
  • Eligibility to apply for Fulbright Canada alumni grants to take on community projects
  • Opportunity to participate in events hosted by the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation, including at least one five-day scientific conference hosted by the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation’s Institutes of Engaged Leadership. The scientific theme for 2020 is Technology & Ethics.
 Institutes of Engaged Leadership
Scholars taking up the joint visiting Chair in Contemporary Public Policy will have the opportunity to participate in at least one five-day scientific conference component of the Trudeau Foundation’s Institutes of Engaged Leadership as a participant, facilitator, teacher and/or speaker, and prepare any key-related readings or material in preparation.
The opportunity would not only be for the benefit of Scholars attending the Institutes, but also to the visiting Chair, in sharing their knowledge, learning from others and expanding their networks.
Mentorship
Fellows taking up the joint visiting Chair in Contemporary Public Policy will have a multi-faceted opportunity to contribute to the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation’s mission, by acting as guides and mentors to the next generation of bold, innovative Scholars. This critical role means fostering the development of Scholars—all of whom are PhD students in the social sciences and humanities—so they become public educators with meaningful impact in their institutions and communities. The Fulbright Canada – Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellow will receive an allowance of up to CDN $15,000 to support mentorship activities that empower Scholars to become engaged leaders of tomorrow.
Eligibility
·         United States Citizenship (Dual Citizenship US/CAN are also eligible)
·         Be a US-based scholar
·         PhD or equivalent terminal professional degree (at the time of taking the award)
·         English proficiency
Deadline: January 15, 2020
Starting Date: some activities start June 2020 with September 2020 being the beginning of residency
—————————————————————————————————————————————
Application instructions:
·         Project Statement: between 3 to 5 pages of description + Bibliography
·         Tailored Curriculum Vitae: up to 6 pages
·         Recommendation Letters: two references letters received by January 30, 2020 to be submitted to the email: petfellowship@fulbright.ca
·         Complete application form
 The application platform will be available shortly.
We would very much appreciate it if you can also share this information with colleagues that may be interested.
For more information about the award and application process please see this website.
For further questions, please contact Paulo Carvalho: petfellowship@fulbright.ca
Québec 2020
The 22nd Biennial Conference of the ACQS
October 21-25, 2020, at the Hôtel Le Concorde, Québec City
The American Council for Québec Studies invites proposals for papers and panels for our upcoming conference in October 2020. For this conference held in the national capital of Québec, we hope to give space to multiple openings and exchanges. We welcome and will consider proposals related to any aspect of Québec studies, including Québec’s diasporas and the Francophone presence in the Americas. We are open to a wide range of approaches across the Social and Physical Sciences and Humanities. Submissions of both individual papers and complete panels are encouraged. Please consult our website (www.acqs.org) for more details.
To submit an abstract: All submissions (abstracts of +/-250 words) are made via the ACQS website. Conference presentations can be made in French or English. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is April 1st, 2020.
To post a panel description on the ACQS website in order to solicit abstracts: Send the title of your proposed session and a short description (+/- 250 words), as well as your name, affiliation, and contact information to Yulia Bosworth, Vice President, at bosworth@binghamton.edu. To submit a complete session: Each presenter should submit abstracts individually, indicating the full session’s title and its chair or organizer where requested.
The ACQS is happy to announce a discounted group rate at the Hôtel Le Concorde, situated on a splendid site in the national capital. A link for reservations will be posted on the ACQS website in Spring 2020. We remind you that each conference participant must register and become a member of the association.
Call for submissions
IDENTITY PERFORMANCE IN NORTH AMERICAN FRANCOPHONE SPACES
Quebec and Francophone Studies Conference
A collaboration between Carleton University’s School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies and Trent University’s Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies
March 20th-21st, 2020, Ottawa, Ontario
How do we understand, identify, name and problematize the physical, political, historical, cultural, identity-based and memorial spaces francophones live in, where questions about belonging are at play and performed in North America? Does the relationship to one or more of these tangible and intangible places, or even to a superimposed composition of several of these spaces, contribute to the manifestation of belonging to a language, a region, a territory, a culture, a social class or a country? What about the identity-based relationship to the national capital? Intrinsic to the ideology of Pierre Elliot Trudeau and his vision of Canada, official bilingualism was, in addition to provide an anchor for the unity of the nation, a commitment to the development of linguistic minorities (Official Languages Act of 1985), a strategy of resistance to assimilation, and a way of separating ethnicity from language and allowing more openness to immigration (Pierre E. Trudeau, 1969). If the French language became one of two official languages – state sponsored, in a minority position to English, and largely politicized – discussions about francophone communities in minority settings in Canada continue to raise polarizing ideas about the quality of the French language, the importance of French-Canadian heritage and the threat of assimilation. In her recent documentary Denise au pays des Francos, Denise Bombardier makes a distinction between francophones of French-Canadian heritage outside of Quebec and immigrant francophone Canadians. Is Quebec as a nation still a home (in the sense of Heimat) where Francophone Canadiens can find refuge and nourishment so they can move surviving to thriving?
The Université de l’Ontario Français project is now on the rails. Here in Ontario, we can indeed see that one hundred years after Regulation 17 and more than twenty years after having won the battle to maintain the Montfort Hospital (1997) it is time to take stock of the collective identity of Franco-Ontarians and to celebrate the thriving francophone minority communities of North America. What is really going on? Does a Canadian Francophonie exist? How do we give Francophones a voice in politics in a rhetoric of reparation given that the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2015) reveals the ravages caused by the residential school system, where the goal was largely to extinguish Indigenous languages? How do we now approach the history and the status of French as a colonial language? What about the relationship between Francophones to each other, to the Quebecois, to other minority contexts, and to Indigenous peoples? This conference is held in an Anglophone setting of a unilingual anglophone university – in Canada’s officially bilingual national capital with a goal of creating a space for exchanges between francophone and Francophile researchers from all North American spaces – whether they are from Quebec or outside of Quebec, Canadians, Americans, Indigenous, French or English speaking, in order to create bridges between people, communities, networks and disciplines.
The School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University, in collaboration with the Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies at Trent University, invites academic and independent researchers, and Master and PhD level students to join us to reflect on these questions. The conference will take place March 20th and 21st 2020, to mark International Francophonie Day. We are accepting suggestions for panel topics as well as individual proposals. We invite proposals in French and English about francophones minorities in Canada, Franco-Americans, Cajuns, Acadians, Quebecois, Indigenous peoples, and French-speaking immigrant communities, particularly those related to:
  1. Identity performance among linguistic and cultural minorities;
  2. Representations in collective narratives and the construction of counter-narratives;
  3. Mobility, attachment to place, and social movements; and
  4. The preservation and revitalization of language.
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
We are accepting proposals from interdisciplinary and discipline-based researchers such as Quebec studies, Francophone studies, Indigenous studies, Canadian studies, sociology, history, museum or archival studies, political science, anthropology, literature and the performing arts, media studies and religious studies. To submit your proposal please send a 300-word resume of your paper and a brief 100-word biography by December 19th, 2019.
Proposals will be evaluated, and successful speakers will be contacted in January 2020. Additional information on the location of the conference and registration process will be sent at that time. We hope to offer simultaneous translation in English and French. The level of support available to participants will depend on funding received.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN Announcements

A newsletter from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies News & Events
Next Colloquium
December 10, 2019
Tyler Nodine, UC Berkeley
Tuesday December 10, 12:30 PM, 223 Moses Hall
Colloquium: Speaker – Tyler Nodine, UC Berkeley Graduate Student & Hildebrand Fellow with Canadian Studies
Tyler Nodine will discuss adaptive management and the future of the U.S./Canada Columbia River Treaty. Lunch provided. Free, open to all.
This event is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Catching Up With Dr. Richards
This July over 1 million people descended upon Calgary, Alberta to attend the annual Calgary Stampede, a ten-day celebration of western culture. Kimberly Richards, a former Canadian Studies Hildebrand Fellow turns a critical eye toward what is branded as “the greatest outdoor show on Earth”. Dr. Richards’ article, “Crude Optimism: Romanticizing Alberta’s Oil Frontier at the Calgary Stampede,” won The Drama Review’s 2019 prestigious Graduate Student Essay competition and was published in TDR this summer. Dr. Richards explains, the “article interrogates the economic and affective ties between Alberta’s oil and gas industry and the Calgary Stampede and argues the Stampede produces an affective climate of ‘crude optimism,’ an attachment to fossil fuels despite the brutal realities of extractivism and carbon emissions.” Following the filing of her dissertation, which investigated linkages between performance and petro-imperialism, at UC Berkeley in summer 2019, Dr. Richards took a position as Instructor of English at the University of the Fraser Valley in Abbotsford, B.C. In September, the Canadian Studies Program caught up with Dr. Richards to hear about her new position and her experience at Cal. Click here to read the full article.
Employment Opportunity
Western Washington University Canadian-American Studies is hiring!
The below comes to us from our friends at Western Washington University:
The Canadian-American Studies Program at Western Washington University is urgently seeking a graduate student or junior scholar who might be interested in teaching for us in the winter 2020 term. The two courses are:
HIST 277: Canada: A Historical Survey (60 students), and
HIST 379: Canadian-American Relations (35 students).
Both courses are scheduled for Tuesday/Thursday. They contribute to the History Department as well as to interdisciplinary programs in Canadian-American Studies and Salish Sea Studies.
There is also the opportunity to continue teaching in the spring 2020 term if the candidate is interested. Right now, the schedule is slated to offer the following:
HIST 277: Canada: A Historical Survey (cross-listed with C/AM)
HIST 390: Environmental History of Canada (the History Department would consider offering a different 300-level course in the area of the candidate’s specialization).
Please circulate. Questions and interested candidates should be directed to Johann Neem, the Chair of the History Department (neemj@wwu.edu) and send applications to https://employment.wwu.edu/cw/en-us/job/496156/history-nontenure-track-vacancy-pool.
This is an urgent search to replace a faculty member who recently left the university. Interested candidates should email Professor Neem ASAP.
Call for submissions
IDENTITY PERFORMANCE IN NORTH AMERICAN FRANCOPHONE SPACES
Quebec and Francophone Studies Conference
A collaboration between Carleton University’s School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies and Trent University’s Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies
March 20th-21st, 2020, Ottawa, Ontario
How do we understand, identify, name and problematize the physical, political, historical, cultural, identity-based and memorial spaces francophones live in, where questions about belonging are at play and performed in North America? Does the relationship to one or more of these tangible and intangible places, or even to a superimposed composition of several of these spaces, contribute to the manifestation of belonging to a language, a region, a territory, a culture, a social class or a country? What about the identity-based relationship to the national capital? Intrinsic to the ideology of Pierre Elliot Trudeau and his vision of Canada, official bilingualism was, in addition to provide an anchor for the unity of the nation, a commitment to the development of linguistic minorities (Official Languages Act of 1985), a strategy of resistance to assimilation, and a way of separating ethnicity from language and allowing more openness to immigration (Pierre E. Trudeau, 1969). If the French language became one of two official languages – state sponsored, in a minority position to English, and largely politicized – discussions about francophone communities in minority settings in Canada continue to raise polarizing ideas about the quality of the French language, the importance of French-Canadian heritage and the threat of assimilation. In her recent documentary Denise au pays des Francos, Denise Bombardier makes a distinction between francophones of French-Canadian heritage outside of Quebec and immigrant francophone Canadians. Is Quebec as a nation still a home (in the sense of Heimat) where Francophone Canadiens can find refuge and nourishment so they can move surviving to thriving?
The Université de l’Ontario Français project is now on the rails. Here in Ontario, we can indeed see that one hundred years after Regulation 17 and more than twenty years after having won the battle to maintain the Montfort Hospital (1997) it is time to take stock of the collective identity of Franco-Ontarians and to celebrate the thriving francophone minority communities of North America. What is really going on? Does a Canadian Francophonie exist? How do we give Francophones a voice in politics in a rhetoric of reparation given that the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2015) reveals the ravages caused by the residential school system, where the goal was largely to extinguish Indigenous languages? How do we now approach the history and the status of French as a colonial language? What about the relationship between Francophones to each other, to the Quebecois, to other minority contexts, and to Indigenous peoples? This conference is held in an Anglophone setting of a unilingual anglophone university – in Canada’s officially bilingual national capital with a goal of creating a space for exchanges between francophone and Francophile researchers from all North American spaces – whether they are from Quebec or outside of Quebec, Canadians, Americans, Indigenous, French or English speaking, in order to create bridges between people, communities, networks and disciplines.
The School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University, in collaboration with the Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies at Trent University, invites academic and independent researchers, and Master and PhD level students to join us to reflect on these questions. The conference will take place March 20th and 21st 2020, to mark International Francophonie Day. We are accepting suggestions for panel topics as well as individual proposals. We invite proposals in French and English about francophones minorities in Canada, Franco-Americans, Cajuns, Acadians, Quebecois, Indigenous peoples, and French-speaking immigrant communities, particularly those related to:
  1. Identity performance among linguistic and cultural minorities;
  2. Representations in collective narratives and the construction of counter-narratives;
  3. Mobility, attachment to place, and social movements; and
  4. The preservation and revitalization of language.
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
We are accepting proposals from interdisciplinary and discipline-based researchers such as Quebec studies, Francophone studies, Indigenous studies, Canadian studies, sociology, history, museum or archival studies, political science, anthropology, literature and the performing arts, media studies and religious studies. To submit your proposal please send a 300-word resume of your paper and a brief 100-word biography by December 19th, 2019.
Proposals will be evaluated, and successful speakers will be contacted in January 2020. Additional information on the location of the conference and registration process will be sent at that time. We hope to offer simultaneous translation in English and French. The level of support available to participants will depend on funding received.
____________________________________________
Appel de propositions
PERFORMANCES DE L’IDENTITÉ DANS LES ESPACES FRANCOPHONES NORD-AMÉRICAINS
Colloque sur les études québécoises et francophones
Une collaboration entre la School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies de l’Université Carleton et le Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies de l’Université Trent.
Les 20 et 21 mars 2020, Ottawa, Ontario
Comment comprendre, identifier, nommer et problématiser les espaces physiques, politiques, historiques, culturels, identitaires et mémoriels francophones où les questions d’appartenance se jouent et se performent en Amérique du Nord? La relation à l’un de ces lieux physique ou intangible ou encore, la dialectique avec une composition superposée de plusieurs de ces espaces participent-elles de la manifestation de l’appartenance à une langue, à une région, à un territoire, à une culture, à une classe sociale ou au pays? Qu’en est-il du rapport identitaire à l’espace de la capitale nationale? Intrinsèque à la pensée de Pierre Elliott Trudeau et à sa vision du Canada, le bilinguisme officiel fut, outre une balise pour l’unité du pays, un engagement envers l’épanouissement des minorités linguistiques (Loi sur les langues officielles de 1985) une stratégie de résistance à l’assimilation et une façon de désethniciser le rapport à la langue et permettre l’ouverture à l’immigration (Pierre E. Trudeau, 1969). Si le français est devenu l’une des deux langues officielles – subventionné et minoritaire, aux accents largement politisés – parler des communautés francophones en milieu minoritaire au Canada continue d’attiser des réflexions polarisantes sur la qualité de la langue, l’importance de l’héritage canadien-français et la menace de l’assimilation. Faut-il, comme Denise Bombardier dans son récent documentaire Denise au pays des Francos, distinguer les francophones d’héritage canadien-français hors Québec des Canadiens francophones issus de l’immigration? «Le pays du Québec» est-il encore un foyer (dans le sens de Heimat) où les Francophones canadiens devraient venir se réfugier et se nourrir pour cesser de survivre et enfin s’épanouir?
Le projet de l’Université de l’Ontario Français est maintenant sur les rails. Ici en Ontario, on peut en effet penser que cent ans après le Règlement 17 et plus de vingt ans après avoir gagné la lutte pour le maintien de l’hôpital Montfort (1997) il est temps de faire le bilan sur l’identité collective des Franco-Ontariens et de célébrer l’épanouissement des communautés minoritaires francophones en Amérique du nord. Qu’en est-il vraiment? Existe-il d’ailleurs une francophonie canadienne? Comment donner aux Francophones une voix politique dans une rhétorique de réparation alors que le rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation (2015) révèle les ravages causés par les pensionnats obligatoires, dont la volonté délibérée d’éteindre les langues autochtones? Comment aborder aujourd’hui l’histoire et le statut du français comme langue coloniale ? Qu’en est-il de la relation des Francophones entre eux, avec les Québécois, avec les autres milieux minoritaires et avec les Autochtones? Ce colloque tenu en Anglophonie dans la capitale nationale du Canada vise à créer un espace d’échanges entre les chercheurs francophones et francophiles de tout l’espace nord-américain – qu’ils soient du Québec ou «hors-Québec», Canadiens ou Américains – Autochtones, d’expression française ou anglaise, afin de créer des ponts entre les gens, les communautés, les réseaux et les disciplines.
La School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies de l’Université de Carleton, en collaboration avec le Frost Centre for Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies de l’Université Trent, invitent les chercheurs universitaires, et indépendants ainsi que les étudiants des 2et 3ecycles à venir réfléchir à ces questions. Le colloque aura lieu les 20 et 21 mars 2020, afin de souligner la journée internationale de la francophonie. Nous acceptons les suggestions de panels thématiques de même que les propositions individuelles. Nous invitons les propositions de présentations en français et anglais qui touchent les minorités francophones du Canada, les Franco-Américains, les Cajuns, les Acadiens, les Québécois, les Autochtones et les communautés immigrantes d’expression française et particulièrement celles reliées à ces quatre thèmes :
  1. La performance de l’identité dans les milieux linguistiques et culturels minoritaires;
  2. La représentation des récits collectifs et l’élaboration de récits alternatifs;
  3. La mobilité, l’attachement aux lieux et les mouvements sociaux; et
  4. La préservation et la revitalisation de la langue.
DIRECTIVES DE SOUMISSION
Nous acceptons les propositions de communications de chercheurs interdisciplinaires ainsi que des disciplines telles que les études québécoises, les études francophones, les études autochtones, les études canadiennes, la sociologie, l’histoire, la littérature, les études muséales ou archivistiques, les études politiques, l’anthropologie, les arts d’interprétation, les études médiatiques et les études religieuses. Pour soumettre votre proposition veuillez svp envoyer un résumé de votre proposition de communication de 300 mots et une brève biographie de 100 mots d’ici au 19 décembre 2019.
Les propositions seront évaluées et les conférenciers et conférencières retenu(e)s seront contacté(e)s en janvier 2020. Des informations supplémentaires sur le lieu exact de la conférence et l’inscription seront alors envoyées. Nous espérons pouvoir offrir la traduction simultanée en français et en anglais. L’appui disponible aux participants et participantes dépendra des subventions obtenues.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

 

CAN Announcements

See these up-coming events from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Upcoming Events
Next Colloquium
November 5, 2019
Dr. Christopher Sands, Johns Hopkins University
Narrow Path to a New NAFTA:
Will USMCA Pass in 2019, 2020, or Never?
The United States Mexico Canada Agreement was negotiated before the 2018 Mexican elections, then approved by the Mexican Congress. In 2019 Canadians went to the polls and re-elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau whose Liberals are credited with managing relations with Washington and salvaging Canada’s market access to the United States and Mexico. Now, as the US Congress considers when to start legislative approval, will US elections in 2020 determine the fate of the USMCA? Johns Hopkins University’s Christopher Sands, Senior Research Professor and Director of the Hopkins Center for Canadian Studies at the Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington offers a perspective on what is new in the agreement and what it’s political prospects are as a third national election looms.
223 Moses Hall
Tuesday November 5
12:30 PM
Co-Sponsored by the Public Law & Policy Program
UC Berkeley Law
This event is made possible thanks to the generous support of the Consulate General of Canada San Francisco | Silicon Valley
Catching Up With Dr. Shanahan
When reflecting on his experience at Cal, former Canadian Studies Hildebrand Fellow, Brendan Shanahan, recalls the unique and interdisciplinary atmosphere that the University provides. Dr. Shanahan received his PhD in U.S. History from UC Berkeley in 2018, and this spring was awarded the Immigration and Ethnic History Society’s annual Outstanding Dissertation Award for his dissertation, “Making Modern American Citizenship: Citizens, Aliens, and Rights.” Following this award and the birth of his first child, Dr. Shanahan began a postdoc position at Yale University with the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies and the Center for the Study of Representative Institutions. Dr. Shanahan explains his current research focuses on “legal, political, and popular disputes over the weight, meaning, and limits of (exclusive) American ‘citizenship rights’ from the late-19th to mid-20th century vis-à-vis the rights of noncitizens in the United States.” In addition to revising his award-winning dissertation for publication and working on several “spin-off” projects, Dr. Shanahan teaches upper-level seminars in immigration history and political and policy histories. This upcoming spring he is looking forward to teaching a course in comparative U.S-Canada political development. In September, the Canadian Studies Program caught up with Dr. Shanahan to hear about his current work and his experiences at Cal. Click here to read the full article.
Employment Opportunity
Deadline Extended!
Staff Position:
Canadian Studies is hiring!
Due to the wildfires, blackouts, and campus closures, the deadline to apply for this position has been extended until November 7.
Canadian Studies is hiring a Program Coordinator. This is a full-time program coordinator position shared between the Canadian Studies Program (50%) and the Institute of International Studies (50%). For full consideration, please submit your application by November 7, 2019. (Applicants are advised to disregard a sentence in the job posting about a preliminary review date of October 14, this is required university verbiage not relevant to this particular job posting). The full job posting is here. https://careerspub.universityofcalifornia.edu/psp/ucb/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_APP_SCHJOB.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=21&JobOpeningId=1793&PostingSeq=1
Applications will only be accepted via the official Berkeley jobs portal at the above link. Applicatants with questions about the position are encouraged to contact Elliott Smith elliott.smith@berkeley.edu or Irene Bloemraad bloemr@berkeley.edu.
Final Fall Colloquium December 10
Tuesday December 10, 12:30 PM, 223 Moses Hall
Colloquium: Speaker – Tyler Nodine, UC Berkeley Graduate Student
Tyler Nodine will discuss adaptive management and the future of the U.S./Canada Columbia River Treaty. Lunch provided. Free, open to all.
Community Announcements
The below event announcement comes to us from our friends at the Digital Moose Lounge:
DML Event: Cross Border Wealth Management Panel Discussion
Whether you have recently arrived in the Bay Area or you have been here a long time, managing your cross-border finances can be complicated.
About this Event
The Digital Moose Lounge invites you to a panel discussion on cross border wealth management.
A panel of experts from One Capital Management will be on hand to talk about many financial challenges faced by Canadians living in California, including filing your taxes in Canada and the United States, your insurance policies, managing your Canadian investments and retirement planning.
Bring your questions! The panel will be on hand to answer your Cross-Border Tax Planning, Risk Management, Investment and Wealth Management questions.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720