Tag Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

It’s Election Day! ūüá®ūüᶠUpcoming election panels; plus, new documentary features affiliate

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • It’s Election Day! Here’s what we’re following
  • Affiliate Brian Barsky interviewed in airplane disaster documentary, airing tonight
  • Save the date: Canadian Thanksgiving, Oct. 9
  • Upcoming book talk:¬†Making Middle-Class Multiculturalism
  • External event: “What Happened in Canada‚Äôs 44th General Election”
  • External event: “Canada Votes 2021: Discussing the Canadian Election”
It’s Election Day! Here’s What We’re Following
Today, Canadians head to the polls to exercise their right to vote in an early election called by Prime Minister Trudeau. The elections are seen as a¬†referendum¬†on Mr. Trudeau, who hoped to transform his government’s success in handling the pandemic into a Liberal majority but is now facing stiff competition. Polls show a¬†tight race, with the Liberal and Conservative parties running neck-and-neck in the popular vote at around 31% each.
While we won’t be holding a watch party this year, we’ll certainly be following the results closely. Poll analysis website 538 provides an¬†overview¬†of the current polling situation, the role of minor parties in the next government, and the likelihood of Trudeau remaining prime minister. Here’s¬†what to watch¬†as the results roll in over the next few hours. And for live post-election analysis, check out the panels in our External Events!
IN THE NEWS
Affiliate Brian Barsky Interviewed in New Airplane Disaster Documentary, Airing Tonight
Canadian Studies faculty affiliate Brian Barsky will be appearing in a new episode of the documentary series¬†Ten Steps to Disaster, premiering tonight. Produced by Channel 5 (Britain) and the Smithsonian, the series explores lessons from the worst aviation disasters in recent history. Tonight’s episode explores the history of the Boeing 373 Max, which was grounded in 2019 after two major crashes killed 361 people within five months.
Professor Barsky, who is a professor of computer science with a specialty in computer-aided design and modeling, appears on the show as an expert witness to discuss the troubled development of the airplane and the flaws in its automated stabilization software that were responsible for the crash. Professor Barsky penned a¬†Globe and Mail opinion¬†last year, arguing against the decision of Canadian authorities to allow the 737 Max to resume flights without significant modifications. Investigations revealed that Boeing knew about and covered up these defects, leading to a $2.5 billion settlement against the company; American federal prosecutors yesterday announced¬†criminal charges¬†against the plane’s chief technical pilot for misleading the FAA.
The episode premieres tonight on the Smithsonian Channel at 6 pm PT, with a repeat at 10 pm.
UPCOMING EVENTS
Save the Date: 4th Annual Canadian Thanksgiving
October 9 | 4:30 pm | Alumni House, UC Berkeley
Canadian Studies is pleased to announce that our annual Canadian Family Thanksgiving will be happening as scheduled this October! Join us and our partners at the¬†Digital Moose Lounge¬†for a special meal celebrating the Bay Area’s Canadian community as we meet together for the first time since the pandemic. Mingle with your fellow SF Bay Canadians while enjoying entertainment and a delicious boxed turkey dinner. The dinner will take place outdoors and will observe all relevant public health measures.
Tickets will be required to attend the event: purchasing information to come soon.
Book Talk: Making Middle-Class Multiculturalism: Immigration Bureaucrats and Policymaking in Postwar Canada
October 12 | 12:30 pm PT | Online | RSVP here
In the 1950s and 1960s, immigration bureaucrats played an important yet unacknowledged role in transforming Canada’s immigration policy. Their perceptions and judgements about the admissibility of individuals influenced the creation of formal admissions criteria for skilled workers and family immigrants that continue to shape immigration to Canada. Bureaucrats emphasized not just economic utility, but also middle-class traits and values such as wealth accumulation, educational attainment, entrepreneurial spirit, resourcefulness and a strong work ethic. By making “middle-class multiculturalism” a basis of nation-building in Canada, they created a much-admired approach to managing racial diversity that has nevertheless generated significant social inequalities. Migration expert Jennifer Elrick will discuss insights from her forthcoming book examining the topic.
Jennifer Elrick is an assistant professor of sociology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. Her research interests lie in the area of state classifications (in censuses and immigration policy) and their relationship to social stratification along the lines of race, gender, and social class. Her work is multi-national in scope, focusing on Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
What Happened in Canada’s 44th General Election
September 22 | 12:00 pm PT | Online | RSVP here
The Canadian federal election on September 20 followed a 36-day campaign marred by heckling, protestors, and attack ads. Six political parties competed for 338 seats in the House of Commons after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the snap election. The Wilson Center’s Canada Institute gathers political experts from coast to coast to assess the outcome and outlook for the new government, trends revealed during the campaign, and implications for Canada’s relations with the United States and the world.
Institute director and Canadian Studies board member Chris Sands will moderate a panel featuring Frédérick Gagnon, a professor of political science at the Université du Québec à Montréal and a past Fulbright Chair and Sproul Fellow in the Canadian Studies Program, alongside other distinguished academics and politicians.
Canada Votes 2021: Discussing the Canadian Election
September 23 | 1:00 pm PT | Online | RSVP here
The¬†Yale MacMillan Center-Committee on Canadian Studies¬†invites you to virtually attend their expert panel and roundtable. Voters across Canada will head to the polls to participate in the 44th Canadian Federal Election. From pandemic mitigation strategies and climate change policies to the rights of marginalized Canadians and the structure of Canadian federalism, the topics of debate have grown numerous. The dimensions of electoral competition have similarly proliferated. Six political parties (none of which are currently polling above one-third of overall electorate) now fiercely compete to elect MPs. A minority Parliament ‚Äď in which the left-wing NDP and/or the nationalist Bloc Qu√©b√©cois will hold the balance of power between the Liberals and Conservatives ‚Äď remains the most likely (though far from certain) outcome.
This panel will unpack the election results, contextualize their place in Canadian political history, analyze key issues arising during the election, and discuss the possible ramifications of the election in Canada and beyond its borders. We hope you will join us, ask questions, and discuss this fascinating and fast-moving election!
The panel will feature former Canadian Studies Hildebrand Fellow Dr. Brendan Shanahan (Yale University) alongside other commentators from Yale and the University of Alberta.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

First fall event tomorrow! How the pandemic is shaping elections in the US & Canada

A reminder of this item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area that is happening tomorrow.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Tomorrow: The Politics of Coronavirus in Canada and the United States
  • Upcoming book talk:¬†Making Middle-Class Multiculturalism
  • External event: “Inuit: The Arctic We Want”
  • External exhibit:¬†Collective Memories: Stonecuts from Cape Dorset
TOMORROW
Elections Matter: The Politics of Coronavirus in Canada and the United States
September 14 | 12:30 pm | Online | RSVP here
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have wide-ranging consequences on North American politics. The effect of the pandemicon Joe Biden’s 2020 win remains debated; meanwhile, Justin Trudeau hopes to use the belated success of his vaccine procurement strategy to win his party a parliamentary majority in the September 20 federal elections. How has COVID-19 shaped electoral politics in Canada and the United States as it relates to crucial recent and ongoing policy choices? Political scientist Daniel B√©land will address this question while discussing the potential political and policy consequences of the upcoming Canadian elections.
Daniel Béland is James McGill Professor of Political Science at McGill University and director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. His research focuses on public policy, political sociology, and federalism and territorial politics.
UPCOMING EVENT
Book Talk: Making Middle-Class Multiculturalism: Immigration Bureaucrats and Policymaking in Postwar Canada
October 12 | 12:30 pm | Online | RSVP here
In the 1950s and 1960s, immigration bureaucrats played an important yet unacknowledged role in transforming Canada’s immigration policy. Their perceptions and judgements about the admissibility of individuals influenced the creation of formal admissions criteria for skilled workers and family immigrants that continue to shape immigration to Canada. Bureaucrats emphasized not just economic utility, but also middle-class traits and values such as wealth accumulation, educational attainment, entrepreneurial spirit, resourcefulness and a strong work ethic. By making “middle-class multiculturalism” a basis of nation-building in Canada, they created a much-admired approach to managing racial diversity that has nevertheless generated significant social inequalities. Migration expert Jennifer Elrick will discuss insights from her forthcoming book examining the topic.
Jennifer Elrick is an assistant professor of sociology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. Her research interests lie in the area of state classifications (in censuses and immigration policy) and their relationship to social stratification along the lines of race, gender, and social class. Her work is multi-national in scope, focusing on Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Inuit: The Arctic We Want
September 14 | 1 pm ET (11 am PT) | RSVP here
On July 16-19, 2018, delegates from Alaska, Greenland, Canada and Chukotka (Russia) came together for the 13th General Assembly of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC). Under the theme ‚ÄúInuit ‚Äď The Arctic We Want,‚ÄĚ delegates discussed policies and developed strategies for the 2018-2022 Alaskan Chairmanship of ICC. The event culminated in the adoption of the Utqiagvik Declaration, which serves as a guide for the ICC‚Äôs work over the 2018-2022 term and as a reflection of Inuit priorities across Alaska, Greenland, Canada and the Russian Federation. Please join the Wilson Center‚Äôs Polar Institute as we welcome ICC leaders to share their perspectives on the Utqiagvik Declaration‚Äôs priorities, reflections on their implementation since 2018, and goals for the final year of the Alaskan Chairmanship.
Exhibit: Collective Memories: Stonecuts from Cape Dorset
September 15 – December 12
St Mary’s College Museum of Art |¬†Learn more
In the 1960s, graphic arts flourished in the newly formed Cape Dorset (Kinngnait) arts co-operative on Baffin Island in Nunavut. The co-operative sought to encourage art making and craft as an income source for local Inuit residents transitioning from seminomadic camps to permanent settlements. The residents experimented with materials and techniques at the co-operative, inventing their own adaptation of woodcut printmaking through direct stencil and relief carving on stone.
The selected works in Collective Memories speak to the collaborative nature, both in technique and meaning, of cultural practices at the co-operative. They reflect the traditional migratory lifestyle, a way of life undergoing rapid change as outside cultural influences impacted day-to-day lives. Depictions of mammals, birds, and marine life bring forth legends, shamanistic practices, and mythologies that had been memorized and told from one generation to the next.
An exhibit opening celebration will be held on September 16 from 4-8 p.m.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Happy Labo(u)r Day & Rosh Hashanah; More upcoming events

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Happy Labo(u)r Day and¬†Shanah Tovah!
  • Next week: The Politics of Coronavirus in Canada and the United States
  • Upcoming book talk:¬†Making Middle-Class Multiculturalism
  • Applications open: Mid-career international affairs fellowship in Canada
  • External event: “Inuit: The Arctic We Want”
  • External exhibit:¬†Collective Memories: Stonecuts from Cape Dorset
Happy Labo(u)r Day!
Today, Americans and Canadians celebrate the contributions of the labour movement to our societies. Originating in the worker’s rallies the late 19th century, cross-border activism achieved national recognition for the holiday in both the US and Canada in 1894.
Once celebrated with massive union rallies, parades, and picnics across North American’s major cities, the decline of labour in the US and Canada since the 1950s has eroded the holiday’s original working-class identity. Former Canadian Studies Hildebrand Fellow Barry Eidlin tackles some of the reasons for this decline in his¬†recent book¬†comparing the US and Canadian union movements. Nevertheless, millions of Americans and Canadians continue to enjoy a long weekend of rest and recreation, a lasting tribute to organized labour’s past successes.
Image: Labour Day Parade in Toronto, 2011. (CAW Media/Wikimedia Commons)
… and¬†Shanah Tovah!
This evening also marks the beginning of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Starting at sunset and lasting through Wednesday, Rosh Hashanah marks the beginning of the High Holy Days and is a time to reflect on the past year and one’s hopes for the future. As home to the second- and fourth-largest Jewish communities in the world, both the United States and Canada have been profoundly shaped by the contributions of their Jewish citizens. To all those celebrating,¬†shanah tovah¬†from Canadian Studies!
NEXT WEEK
Elections Matter: The Politics of Coronavirus in Canada and the United States
September 14 | 12:30 pm | Online | RSVP here
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have wide-ranging consequences on North American politics. The effect of the pandemicon Joe Biden’s 2020 win remains debated; meanwhile, Justin Trudeau hopes to use the belated success of his vaccine procurement strategy to win his party a parliamentary majority in the September 20 federal elections. How has COVID-19 shaped electoral politics in Canada and the United States as it relates to crucial recent and ongoing policy choices? Political scientist Daniel B√©land will address this question while discussing the potential political and policy consequences of the upcoming Canadian elections.
Daniel Béland is James McGill Professor of Political Science at McGill University and director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. His research focuses on public policy, political sociology, and federalism and territorial politics.
UPCOMING EVENT
Book Talk: Making Middle-Class Multiculturalism: Immigration Bureaucrats and Policymaking in Postwar Canada
October 12 | 12:30 pm | Online | RSVP here
In the 1950s and 1960s, immigration bureaucrats played an important yet unacknowledged role in transforming Canada’s immigration policy. Their perceptions and judgements about the admissibility of individuals influenced the creation of formal admissions criteria for skilled workers and family immigrants that continue to shape immigration to Canada. Bureaucrats emphasized not just economic utility, but also middle-class traits and values such as wealth accumulation, educational attainment, entrepreneurial spirit, resourcefulness and a strong work ethic. By making “middle-class multiculturalism” a basis of nation-building in Canada, they created a much-admired approach to managing racial diversity that has nevertheless generated significant social inequalities. Migration expert Jennifer Elrick will discuss insights from her forthcoming book examining the topic.
Jennifer Elrick is an assistant professor of sociology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. Her research interests lie in the area of state classifications (in censuses and immigration policy) and their relationship to social stratification along the lines of race, gender, and social class. Her work is multi-national in scope, focusing on Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom.
Applications open: International Affairs Fellowship in Canada
Deadline: October 31 | Apply here
Launched in 2016, the International Affairs Fellowship (IAF) in Canada, sponsored by Power Corporation of Canada, seeks to strengthen mutual understanding and cooperation between rising generations of leaders and thinkers in the United States and Canada. The program provides for one to two mid-career professionals per year to spend six to twelve months hosted by a Canadian institution to deepen their knowledge of Canada. Fellows are drawn from academia, business, government, media, NGOs, and think tanks.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens, possess at least a bachelor’s degree, and demonstrate a strong record of professional achievement and a commitment to a career in foreign policy. The program awards a stipend of $95,000 for a period of twelve months (or a prorated amount if the duration is shorter) as well as a modest travel allowance. Please visit the link above to view full program details and submit an application.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Inuit: The Arctic We Want
September 14 | 1 pm ET (11 am PT) | RSVP here
On July 16-19, 2018, delegates from Alaska, Greenland, Canada and Chukotka (Russia) came together for the 13th General Assembly of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC). Under the theme ‚ÄúInuit ‚Äď The Arctic We Want,‚ÄĚ delegates discussed policies and developed strategies for the 2018-2022 Alaskan Chairmanship of ICC. The event culminated in the adoption of the Utqiagvik Declaration, which serves as a guide for the ICC‚Äôs work over the 2018-2022 term and as a reflection of Inuit priorities across Alaska, Greenland, Canada and the Russian Federation. Please join the Wilson Center‚Äôs Polar Institute as we welcome ICC leaders to share their perspectives on the Utqiagvik Declaration‚Äôs priorities, reflections on their implementation since 2018, and goals for the final year of the Alaskan Chairmanship.
Exhibit: Collective Memories: Stonecuts from Cape Dorset
September 15 – December 12
St Mary’s College Museum of Art |¬†Learn more
In the 1960s, graphic arts flourished in the newly formed Cape Dorset (Kinngnait) arts co-operative on Baffin Island in Nunavut. The co-operative sought to encourage art making and craft as an income source for local Inuit residents transitioning from seminomadic camps to permanent settlements. The residents experimented with materials and techniques at the co-operative, inventing their own adaptation of woodcut printmaking through direct stencil and relief carving on stone.
The selected works in Collective Memories speak to the collaborative nature, both in technique and meaning, of cultural practices at the co-operative. They reflect the traditional migratory lifestyle, a way of life undergoing rapid change as outside cultural influences impacted day-to-day lives. Depictions of mammals, birds, and marine life bring forth legends, shamanistic practices, and mythologies that had been memorized and told from one generation to the next.
An exhibit opening celebration will be held on September 16 from 4-8 p.m.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Meet our new research fellow; undergrad course recommendations

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Meet our new Sproul Fellow, Nicholas A. R. Fraser
  • Undergrad class suggestions with a Canadian angle
  • Upcoming event: The Politics of Coronavirus in Canada and the United States
  • External event: “Inuit: The Arctic We Want”
New Sproul Fellow Nicholas Fraser Studies Impact of Bureaucratic Culture on Government Policy
Dr. Nicholas A. R. Fraser, a political scientist specializing in the impact of organizational culture on policy application, officially joins Canadian Studies Wednesday as a John A. Sproul Research Fellow. As a visiting researcher, Dr. Fraser will assist program director Irene Bloemraad with research on migration-related topics.
Dr. Fraser received his B.A. from the University of Calgary and holds M.A.s from the University of British Columbia and Waseda University (Japan). He received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto, where he was previously an associate at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.
Canadian Studies sat down with Dr. Fraser to discuss his past research and what drew him to Berkeley. Highlights from the interview are below: read the full piece on our website.
What sparked your initial interest in immigration?
Just before I finished my bachelor’s degree, I had opportunity to teach English abroad in Japan. That experience set the agenda for kind of research I do, because it was only by going to Japan that I realized how unique Canada is in terms of immigration and multiculturalism. I just hadn’t fully appreciated how different Canada is from other countries, even other developed democracies.
While I was over there, I had the chance to meet some foreign workers from Brazil, who told me how difficult it was to get legal status and to bring family members in. And I thought, that would be way easier in Canada, so why is it so hard here? I realized that actually, maybe I should look at the question another way Рin a global sense, Canada’s immigration policy is comparatively pretty generous. I was curious where that comes from.
People often point to Canada’s history or culture as an explanation, but I think that’s a reductive way of looking at things. Australia, for instance, has a similar history, yet immigration is seen much less positively there and they have a much stricter refugee policy. So my research situates Canada in a comparative perspective to understand why we have a relatively generous refugee policy legacy.
Why did you apply to be a Canadian Studies Sproul Fellow?
I love the interdisciplinary approach here. UC Berkeley is an amazing research university, and there‚Äôs a great community here working on a number of different aspects of migration. But the number one reason is Irene. She‚Äôs a force to be reckoned within migration studies. The opportunity to work with someone that has so much influence on interdisciplinary migration studies, political science, psychology, sociology ‚Äď that would be a game-changer. It‚Äôs the dream, really, getting to work with an amazing person at an amazing institution.
What will you be working on at Berkeley?
Irene and I are going to be doing a lot of things together. One project that we are considering is how multiculturalism affects legal proceedings. In court, for example, many people have a default expectation that witnesses will swear on the Christian Bible. So the question is, if you’re a juror, how credibly do you view people who choose to swear on another text, who are often religious or ethnic minorities?
This is an important issue, because we want to see if it feeds into structural biases against these groups. I’ve already done some experimental research on this topic in Canada with Colton Fehr, and I’ll be giving a talk on some of our preliminary findings in November. We’re still exploring, but my plan is to do a United States-Canada comparison, because this issue is obviously relevant to the United States as well.
Why do you think it’s important to study Canada?
Canada is a comparatively generous country when it comes to immigration and multiculturalism. As a Canadian, I think it‚Äôs important to understand why from a social sciences perspective, in an objective way, for informing better policy. Canada is not perfect ‚Äď I don‚Äôt want to paint an overly rosy picture ‚Äď but there are many things Canada has done right and could improve on in the future. If we have a better idea of why things worked, it makes better policy going forward.
I also think Canada doesn’t get enough attention within political science. A lot of research focuses on the US and Europe, but I think Canada is really important because it differs from those other places on important policy issues such as immigration. So I’m thrilled to be joining the Canadian Studies Program to contribute in any way I can.
Undergrad Course Recommendations: Franco-American Literature and Comparative Disability Law
Are you an undergrad still trying to fill a hole in your schedule, or just looking for an interesting class that covers a Canadian topic? Check out the following courses:
Instructor: Susan A. Maslan
In this course, students will explore the literary and cultural texts emerging from the long history of the French in North America. Throughout the semester, discussions will focus on the politics of representation, understanding the processes through which categories of ‚Äúrace‚ÄĚ are shaped over time. While instruction will focus on the United States, the course will discuss New France (Quebec) and read excerpts from¬†The Jesuit Relations.
This course satisfies the American Cultures requirement.
Instructor: David B. Oppenheimer
Comparative Equality Law uses a problem-based approach to examine how the law protects equality rights in different jurisdictions. The course will comparatively examine US and other international legal systems, including that of Canada, and provide a global overview of legal protection from and legal responses to inequalities. The course covers 5 topic modules: theories and sources of equality law; employment discrimination law; secularism, human rights and the legal rights of religious minorities; sexual harassment/violence; affirmative action, and gender parity.
UPCOMING EVENT
Elections Matter: The Politics of Coronavirus in Canada and the United States
September 14 | 12:30 pm | Online | RSVP here
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have wide-ranging consequences on North American politics. The effect of the pandemicon Joe Biden’s 2020 win remains debated; meanwhile, Justin Trudeau hopes to use the belated success of his vaccine procurement strategy to win his party a parliamentary majority in the September 20 federal elections. How has COVID-19 shaped electoral politics in Canada and the United States as it relates to crucial recent and ongoing policy choices? Political scientist Daniel B√©land will address this question while discussing the potential political and policy consequences of the upcoming Canadian elections.
Daniel Béland is James McGill Professor of Political Science at McGill University and director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. His research focuses on public policy, political sociology, and federalism and territorial politics.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Inuit: The Arctic We Want
September 14 | 1 pm ET (11 am PT) | RSVP here
On July 16-19, 2018, delegates from Alaska, Greenland, Canada and Chukotka (Russia) came together for the 13th General Assembly of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC). Under the theme ‚ÄúInuit ‚Äď The Arctic We Want,‚ÄĚ delegates discussed policies and developed strategies for the 2018-2022 Alaskan Chairmanship of ICC. The event culminated in the adoption of the Utqiagvik Declaration, which serves as a guide for the ICC‚Äôs work over the 2018-2022 term and as a reflection of Inuit priorities across Alaska, Greenland, Canada and the Russian Federation. Please join the Wilson Center‚Äôs Polar Institute as we welcome ICC leaders to share their perspectives on the Utqiagvik Declaration‚Äôs priorities, reflections on their implementation since 2018, and goals for the final year of the Alaskan Chairmanship.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Welcome back to campus; upcoming events; grizzly DNA surprise ūüźĽ

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • A welcome message from program director Irene Bloemraad
  • Upcoming event: The Politics of Coronavirus in Canada and the United States
  • In the news: ‘Mind Blowing’ study links BC grizzlies and Native languages
  • Call for papers: Annual conference of the French Association of Canadian Studies
  • External event: Kitchen gadgets from the Kathleen Thompson Hill collection
  • External event: “Inuit: The Arctic We Want”
A Message From Our Director
This Wednesday marks an exciting milestone, as students return to Berkeley for the first time in over a year. Like many of you, we’re still navigating our physical return to campus and what that means for our program. But no matter how the fall shapes up, we’ll still be offering events and programs that create a forum for important Canadian topics, and supporting students engaged in research that promotes a greater understanding of Canada and its people.
As we work through a “return to normalcy” together, we thank you for being a part of our Canadian Studies community and hope to see you in person before too long!
Warmly,
Irene Bloemraad, Program Co-Director
UPCOMING EVENT
Elections Matter: The Politics of Coronavirus in Canada and the United States
September 14 | 12:30 pm | Online | RSVP here
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have wide-ranging consequences on North American politics. The effect of the virus on Joe Biden’s 2020 win remains debated; meanwhile, Justin Trudeau hopes to use the belated success of his vaccine procurement strategy to win his party a parliamentary majority in the September 20 federal elections. How has COVID-19 shaped electoral politics in Canada and the United States as it relates to crucial recent and ongoing policy choices? Political scientist Daniel B√©land will address this question while discussing the potential political and policy consequences of the upcoming Canadian elections.
Daniel B√©land is James McGill Professor of Political Science at McGill University and director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. His research focuses on public policy, political sociology, and federalism and territorial politics.
IN THE NEWS
‘Mind Blowing’ Study Shows Grizzly Bear DNA Maps onto BC Indigenous Language Families
A new genetic survey demonstrates an astonishing link between British Columbia’s coastal bear population and its Native people. As reported in Science, the study, which was supported by local Indigenous councils, shows that coastal grizzlies divide into three distinct populations. But to researchers’ surprise, the populations do not correspond with obvious geographic barriers; instead, they closely align with the region’s three main language families.
Nevertheless, the results make sense to study co-author Jenn Walkus, a member of the Wuikinuxv Nation. Humans and bears have many of the same resource needs, she notes, such clean water or a steady supply of foods like salmon. This would encourage both groups to settle in the same resource-rich regions. She says that the study demonstrates the importance of recognizing interconnectedness as a principle of conservation work, and managing resources with a view to all species.
Image: Michelle Valberg, Science Magazine.
Call for Papers: Annual Conference of the French Association of Canadian Studies
Deadline: September 30, 2021
Seventy years ago, the Report of the Royal Commission on National Development in the Arts, Letters and Sciences 1949-1951, headed by Vincent Massey, was published. Called by some ‚Äúthe most important official document in the history of Canadian culture‚ÄĚ, the so-called ‚ÄėMassey Report‚Äô was both the first investigation of the state of the arts and culture as well as cultural policies in Canada, and the first major plea in favor of a strategic and financial support from the federal government for culture and cultural institutions across the country.
The French Association of Canadian Studies (AFEC) will explore the legacy of the Massey Report at their next conference, scheduled for June 2022. The objectives of the conference will be to take both a retrospective and prospective look at the state of culture and cultural policies in Canada. Proposals for papers with a title (400 words max) and a short biography (100 words) must be submitted by email to the organizing committee by September 30, 2021. Please visit their website for complete information and applications directions.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Exhibit: Kitchen Gizmos & Gadgets from the Kathleen Thompson Hill Culinary Collection
August 27 – November 28 | Napa Valley Museum | Learn more here
Kathleen Thompson Hill, a noted food and wine writer and Canadian Studies board member, has collected nearly 4,000 kitchen utensils as part of what she calls a ‚Äúquirky obsession.‚ÄĚ In a new exhibit at the Napa Valley Museum in Yountville, she highlights kitchens gadgets and gizmos you will not see anywhere else, from the first-ever ice cream scoop to the Toast-o-Lator. Previews for the exhibit begin this Friday, August 27; the exhibit will officially run from September 25 to November 28. Tickets are included with regular museum admission.
Inuit: The Arctic We Want
September 14 | 1 pm ET (11 am PT) | RSVP here
On July 16-19, 2018, delegates from Alaska, Greenland, Canada and Chukotka (Russia) came together for the 13th General Assembly of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC). Under the theme ‚ÄúInuit ‚Äď The Arctic We Want,‚ÄĚ delegates discussed policies and developed strategies for the 2018-2022 Alaskan Chairmanship of ICC. The event culminated in the adoption of the Utqiagvik Declaration, which serves as a guide for the ICC‚Äôs work over the 2018-2022 term and as a reflection of Inuit priorities across Alaska, Greenland, Canada and the Russian Federation. Please join the Wilson Center‚Äôs Polar Institute as we welcome ICC leaders to share their perspectives on the Utqiagvik Declaration‚Äôs priorities, reflections on their implementation since 2018, and goals for the final year of the Alaskan Chairmanship.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720