Tag Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

Our fall events calendar is here! ūüćā

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Fall 2020 Events Calendar
Canadian Studies is pleased to bring you our events schedule for the Fall 2020 semester. Due to ongoing health and safety concerns, all events will be held virtually via Zoom conferencing through at least December. Please note that a new campus security policy require all participants to have a Zoom account to join meetings; more information on this change can be found at the end. All times posted are Pacific.
No Safe Country for Refugees? The Canada-US Safe Third Country Agreement Before the Canadian Courts
Panel | September 1 | 12:30 PM | Online – RSVP required
Until recently, certain asylum claimants who entered Canada were routinely returned to the United States under the the Safe Third County Agreement. However, in July Canada’s Federal Court ordered the agreement suspended, asserting that the US is “not safe” for refugees due to the risk of imprisonment and other basic rights violations.¬†Audrey Macklin, an expert in human rights law at the University of Toronto, joins Berkeley Law professor¬†Leti Volpp¬†to unpack the ruling and what it means for migrants and US-Canada relations in a conversation moderated by immigration scholar and Canadian Studies director¬†Irene Bloemraad.
Return: On Blackness and Belonging in North America
Lecture | September 15 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP required
McGill University professor Debra Thompson, an expert on race and ethnic politics, will explore the complex experience of Black people in North America, juxtaposing her deep, ancestral links to the United States with a parallel but at times competing national affinity with the land to which many enslaved Black Americans once fled: Canada. Thompson uses personal narrative to explore the boundaries of racial belonging; to identify key facets of Canadian ideas about race and racism, including the intersection of racial formations and settler colonialism; to analyze the transnational nuances and contours of the African diaspora in North America; and ultimately, to think through what it means to be in a place, but not be of that place.
Social Movements and Legal Mobilisation in Times of Crisis: Migrant Farm Worker Rights in Canada
Lecture | October 6 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP required
The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected migrant farm workers. Former Hildebrand Fellow Vasanthi Venkatesh, a professor of law at the University of Windsor specializing in social movements and immigration, gives context to the crisis by showing how the pandemic has overlaid itself onto existing systemic racial discrimination against migrant farm workers embedded in law and policy. She also shows how migrant farm worker advocates have responded to the crisis by exposing the racial capitalism of the Canadian agricultural economy, using radical narratives to challenge these systems.
Virtual Canadian Family Thanksgiving
Event | October, date TBD | Online
While we can’t meet in person this year, Canadian Studies and the¬†Digital Moose Lounge¬†are working hard to offer you a way to celebrate the holiday with the Canadian community in the Bay Area (and beyond!) Stay turned for updates.
Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
Colloquium | October 20 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP required
Learn about the research Canadian Studies funds through our Edward Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowships, as recipients present short overviews of their projects. Participating scholars are¬†Desir√©e Valadares,¬†(“Idling No More: Reading Japanese Canadian World War II Road Camps Alongside Specters of Indigeneity on the Hope-Princeton¬†Highway in British Columbia, Canada”) and¬†Martha Herrera-Lasso Gonzalez¬†(“Regionalizing NAFTA: Theaters of Translation in Mexico City and Quebec”).
What the US Election Means for US-Canada Relations
Round table | November 10 or 17 | Online – RSVP required
What will the results of the 2020 United States presidential election mean for the future of US-Canada relations? This special colloquium will consider the outcomes of the US elections for bilateral relations and their impact on Canada. Participants will include Frédérick Gagnon, a professor of political science at the Université du Québec à Montréal and a past Fulbright Chair and Sproul Fellow in the Canadian Studies Program.
New Security Policy for Digital Events: All Participants Must Sign In
To ensure the security of university-hosted meetings, UC Berkeley recently implemented new security measures for digital events. The most important change is that starting August 15,¬†all participants will be required to sign into a Zoom account prior to joining meetings hosted by UC Berkeley. UC Berkeley affiliates can use their CalNet ID’s to¬†sign in to Zoom. Participants who are not eligible for a UC Berkeley-provided Zoom account can¬†create a free, consumer Zoom account¬†or can¬†dial in via phone.
AFFILIATE EVENTS
Community Q&A: Facing Border Closure Together to Flatten the Curve
Forum | August 12 | 4:00 p.m. PT | Online – RSVP required
Please join the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco and the Digital Moose Lounge for an important conversation about the continued extension of the US/Canada border closure. This is an open format community discussion and an opportunity for you to have your questions answered by experts. The panel will consist of Consul General¬†Rana Sarkar; Senior Consular Officer¬†Marni Kellison; and¬†Pavan Dhillon, an immigration attorney and board member at Berkeley’s Canadian Studies Program.
E-mail wade.wallerstein@international.gc.ca to RSVP.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

A former grad student shares how Canadian Studies helped her choose Berkeley

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Catch up with former Hildebrand Fellow, Julia Lewandoski
  • Affiliate event:¬†Pandemic Immigration Consternation for the US and Canada
  • Affiliate event:¬†Community Q&A: Facing Border Closure Together
“Canadian Studies was a major draw for why I came to Berkeley”:
Catching Up With 2016 Hildebrand Fellow Julia Lewandoski
Dr. Julia Lewandoski is a historian of early North America, who received her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 2019. She completed her undergraduate studies at Harvard and her M.A. at McGill University. While working on her dissertation at Berkeley, she received a Hildebrand Fellowship to fund her research into Indigenous property ownership in Lower Canada. Dr. Lewandoski was recently accepted as a tenure-track faculty member at California State University San Marcos, where she will begin this fall. She is also currently working on a book project that explores how small Indigenous nations across North America exploited imperial transitions to defend land as property in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
Hildebrand Fellow Desirée Valadares sat down with Dr. Lewandoski to find out how Canadian Studies and the Hildebrand Fellowship supported her during her studies at Berkeley, and how her research experience has shaped her career since. Highlights from the interview are below: read our full interview with Dr. Lewandoski here.
What are your research interests? How do they intersect with Canadian Studies?
My research focuses on small Indigenous communities who used land ownership to survive colonialism and keep their communities together outside of the treaty system in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. I knew I wanted to tell a story that wasn’t just about U.S. history, but about settler colonial processes across the North American continent. Bringing in a Canadian piece helped me get away from the nation-state centric frame of U.S. history, and to reflect on how imperial processes have impacted Indigenous communities similarly and differently in the U.S. and Canada. I’ve also been influenced by exposure to Canadian scholarship in history, which tends to focus more on settler colonialism and historical geography, as well as Indigenous studies, where so many of the major thinkers are at Canadian universities!
How did you discover Canadian Studies, and why did you join?
I was worried about leaving Montreal and losing my connection to the Québec history that I had really grown to treasure at McGill. Would anyone in California know or care about Québec history? Knowing that Canadian Studies was here made me feel confident that I could keep my connection to Canadian scholarship and keep doing research in Québec. It was actually a major draw in deciding to come to Berkeley! I also appreciated the way that Canadian Studies works hard to integrate graduate students by giving us opportunities to share our research and practice presenting our work in a supportive environment.
How did the Hildebrand Fellowship support your research?
My project would not have been possible without the support of the Hildebrand Fellowship. I spent several summers and quite a few winter months in Québec. I photographed a lot of historic maps in Québec City, and in Montreal and Trois-Rivières I sorted through thousands of property documents. I was able to visit with Abenaki community leaders and historians at Odanak, and get a better sense of how historic property ownership informs the legal battles they are undertaking today as they defend and reclaim territory in southeastern Québec. I did quite a bit of driving around and exploring the landscape, which turned out to be really important in terms of understanding what pieces of land were claimed, owned, and fought for. I also sampled a lot of poutines!
What do you see as the future of Canadian studies?
Canadian scholarship is leading the way right now in multiple important fields, especially Indigenous studies, and energy, climate change, and environment. Scholars who study the U.S. in the U.S., can always have their perspective enriched and enlarged by considering Canadian scholarship on really any issue… Beyond content, I think the Canadian academic system encourages a more collaborative model in the humanities and social sciences. Something I‚Äôd love to see spread more widely is a more collaborative and less competitive approach to academia.
UPCOMING AFFILIATE EVENTS
Pandemic Immigration Consternation for the United States and Canada
Panel | August 5 | 2:30 PM ET / 11:30 AM PT | Online – RSVP required
The Canada Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars invites you to join them for a virtual panel discussion among experts to consider the implications of recent COVID-related travel restrictions between the US and Canada. In response to COVID-19, both nations have reassessed the risks of cross-border migration. In March, the United States suspended visa processing at US embassies and consulates around the world. In June, the US announced it was suspending H-1B visas, H-2B visas, L visas, and certain J visas through Dec. 31. Then on July 22, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that Canada’s asylum agreement with the United States, known as the Safe Third Country Agreement, violated the Canadian Constitution, and gave Ottawa six months to address the issue before the court orders the agreement invalid on January 22, 2021. How will these changes affect business, families, and individuals? And how might these challenges be resolved in coming months?
Panelists will include Theresa Brown, Director of Immigration and Cross-Border Policy at the Bipartisan Policy Center; Meena Rafie, managing attorney at Erickson Immigration Group; and Richard Sanders, a global fellow at the Canada Institute. The panel will be moderated by Christopher Sands, director of the Canada Institute and board member at the Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley.
RSVP and view the webcast here. Please email questions for the Q&A session to canada@wilsoncenter.org.
Community Q&A: Facing Border Closure Together to Flatten the Curve
Forum | August 12 | 4:00 p.m. PT | Online – RSVP required
Please join the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco and the Digital Moose Lounge for an important conversation about the continued extension of the US/Canada border closure. This is an open format community discussion and an opportunity for you to have your questions answered by experts. The panel will consist of Consul General¬†Rana Sarkar; Senior Consular Officer¬†Marni Kellison; and¬†Pavan Dhillon, an immigration attorney and board member at Berkeley’s Canadian Studies Program.
E-mail wade.wallerstein@international.gc.ca to RSVP.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

 

Meet Canadian Studies Pt. 2, ocean documentaries, and a cook-along recipe ūüėč

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Meet our program:¬†Board Member Pavan Dhillon
  • Cook-along recipe¬†for classic Nanaimo bars!
  • Canadian documentaries streaming¬†at Int’l Ocean Film Festival
Meet Canadian Studies: Board Member Pavan Dhillon
This week, we bring your the second profile in a series highlighting our friends and supporters as they share what Canadian Studies means to them. For our second interview, we talked to board member and immigration attorney Pavan Dhillon about how her work drew her to the program, and what she hopes to accomplish on the board.
Pavan was born and raised in an immigrant family in Vancouver, BC. She completed an undergraduate course in international diplomacy at the University of British Columbia, and received her law degree from McGill University. She immigrated to the US in 2012. Pavan currently operates a boutique immigration law firm in San Francisco, focused exclusively on facilitating permanent relocation or cross-border travel to Canada.
Highlights from our interview with Pavan are below; read the full piece here.
On her work as a Canadian immigration attorney:
I have the unique perspective of being one of a handful of Canadian immigration attorneys based in the United States. Therefore I am fortunate to promote Canada on a daily basis to both individuals and companies seeking opportunities, stability, diversity, and tolerance. I did not set out to become an immigration attorney; however, I quickly realized that my ability to empathize with my clients due to my personal and educational background not only transforms their experience, but also provides me with immeasurable fulfillment.
How she became a board member:
My first ever Canadian event in the Bay Area was the Canadian Studies and Digital Moose Lounge annual Thanksgiving event. There, I met program co-director Irene Bloemraad, and we had a lengthy discussion about the immigrant experience in Canada compared to the United States. She invited me to attend an upcoming lecture on a comparative analysis of US and Canadian immigration policy at Berkeley. Attending that event and other symposia revitalized my interest in Canadian Studies and led to me ultimately joining the advisory board.
Why she supports Canadian Studies at Berkeley:
I have always been fascinated by policy, Canada-US relations, and how immigration policy shapes societies, cultures, and the political landscape. One of the things I enjoy the most about Canadian Studies at Berkeley is the colloquia, as it exposes me to cutting-edge research and innovative studies. I value the opportunity to connect with thought leaders in migration studies, indigenous affairs, politics and sociology.
Cook-Along Recipe: Classic Nanaimo Bars
For Canada Day, Canadian Studies board chair David Stewart and the¬†Digital Moose Lounge¬†teamed up with SF-based baker Angela Gonzalez, owner of¬†Dial-A-Dessert, to show you how to whip up a batch of classic Canadian Nanaimo bars. If you missed the live presentation, you’re in luck – you can now watch the video on Youtube¬†here.
Named after the city of Nanaimo, BC, these deliciously custardy, chocolatey treats require no baking and are a perfect recipe to make with kids! A versatile dessert, they’ll fit in everywhere from your Canada Day picnic to a state dinner – President Obama once made them the finale of a banquet for PM Trudeau at the White House.
Canadian Documentaries That Shine Light On Threats to Oceans
Open Thursday at the International Ocean Film Festival
July 30 – August 9
Two new Canadian documentaries covering critical issues facing the country’s waters will be available to stream at home starting this Thursday, July 30. The films will be available to rent online through August 9 as part of the 17th Annual International Ocean Film Festival, sponsored in part by the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco. Learn more about the festival and register for the virtual screenings¬†here.
The Mill (2019)
52 minutes; English.
Near a First Nations community in Nova Scotia, a paper mill had to stop in January the discharging of waste into noxious ponds that polluted both air and water for decades. The company proposed piping its effluent into the ocean, but met strong opposition from both the native community and fisherfolk. If the mill closes, others will also, putting over 10,000 jobs at risk. Resolving such conflicts is becoming a challenging worldwide problem.
Under Thin Ice (2019)
98 minutes; English.
Extreme divers Jill Heinerth and Mario Cyr explore above and below northern Canada’s ice sheet. It is a hunting ground for beluga whales and narwhals, for walruses and seals that depend on the ice to nurture their young, and for polar bears who live on the ice most of their lives. They all feed on a plethora of sea life, but as the ice melts more each year, their entire ecosystem has come under threat.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

 

New Hilbrand fellow; Canada’s new UN ambassador in conversation

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • New Hildebrand Fellow, Mindy Price
  • Affiliate event tomorrow:¬†Canada’s UN ambassador, Bob Rae, in conversation
  • Last chance to watch Canadian films¬†from the Seattle Int’l Film Festival
New Hildebrand Fellow, Mindy Price, Studies the
Intersection of Agriculture and Indigenous Rights
Canadian Studies is pleased to welcome the latest recipient of the Edward Hildebrand Fellowship, Mindy Price. Mindy is a doctoral student in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management. An environmental sociologist and political ecologist, her research focuses on indigenous food sovereignty and the effects of climate change on agriculture in the far north. Mindy received her B.A. in sociology from Emory University, and her Master of Public Health in global health practice from the University of South Florida.
Mindy’s project will examine recent government agricultural initiatives in the Northwest Territories through the context of Indigenous sovereignty. As climate change and economic shifts increased the attractiveness of farming in the far north, pressure is increasing to settle over 300,000 acres of disputed Indigenous land claims and open these areas to farming. Do these forces represent a threat to Indigenous land sovereignty, and their traditional methods of resource management? What are the benefits and drawbacks these projects present for Indigenous communities and other residents of the Northwest Territories? Mindy plans to conduct interviews and field research in Yellowknife, Hay River, and the Mackenzie River delta to find answers to these questions.
Affiliate Event Tomorrow: Canada at the United Nations, What Next? A Conversation with Canada’s New Ambassador to the UN, Bob Rae
July 21 | 10:00 a.m. PT | Conference call
The Canada Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a discussion tomorrow with Canada’s next Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the United Nations, the Honourable Bob Rae.
Recently, Prime Minster Justin Trudeau‚Äôs four-year campaign effort to secure a rotating seat on the UN Security Council ended in defeat in June. Following Canada‚Äôs failure to secure a seat on the agency‚Äôs decision-making body, questions arose about whether the vote would alter Canada‚Äôs contribution to the UN. Ambassador Rae will highlight Canada’s contribution to the United Nations, and present his vision to further engage international partners and promote the Canadian values of peace, freedom, democracy, and human rights in a time of global uncertainty. The conversation will be moderated by Canada Institute director¬†Dr. Christopher Sands, who is also a board member of Berkeley’s Canadian Studies Program.
To RSVP for this event and view call-in numbers, please click here.
Last Chance to Watch Canadian Films at the Seattle International Film Festival
Streaming through Wednesday, July 23
Two recent films from award-winning Canadian directors will end their virtual run this Wednesday, July 23. The films are being screened by the¬†Seattle International Film Festival,¬†in cooperation with the University of Washington’s Canadian Studies Center, and showcase the talent of two contemporary Canadian filmmakers. Watch them both online¬†here.
Louise Archambault (Québec)
127 minutes; French with English subtitles.
Three elderly hermits live deep in the woods, cut off from the rest of the world. While wildfires threaten the region, their quiet life is about to be shaken by the arrival of two women in this gentle, elegiac study of intertwined lives.
Zacharias Kunuk (Inuit Nunangat)
111 minutes; Inuktitut with English subtitles.
In 1961, Noah Piugattuck and his band of nomadic Inuit hunters are approached by a brutish white man known as “Boss” who pressures them to abandon their traditional way of life and move into settlement housing.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

 

New series: Meet Canadian Studies! Plus: student research, Canadian film, & more

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Meet our program:¬†Interview with advisory board chair, David Stewart
  • Hildebrand recipient publishes study¬†on minority political coalitions
  • Call for papers¬†on Canada’s image abroad
  • Canadian films streaming¬†at International Ocean Film Festival
Meet Canadian Studies: Advisory Board Chair David Stewart
Canadian Studies is pleased to introduce a new series¬†of profiles highlighting¬†our friends and supporters as they share what our program means to them. For our inaugural interview, we sat down with advisory board chair David Stewart to discuss why he supports Canadian Studies and how he envisions the program’s future.
David grew up in an Anglophone family in Qu√©bec and was educated at McGill University. He moved to the United States in 1995, and became involved with Canadian Studies after settling in the Bay Area in 2007. He joined the external board in 2016. As chair, David has taken energetic steps to revitalize the program’s community outreach and research support. David also chaired the Digital Moose Lounge, a social club for Bay Area Canadians, from 2014-2017. He currently works as a consultant on Canada-US ventures.
Highlights from our interview with David are below; read the full piece here.
On the importance of the Canadian Studies Program:
I value the community and fellowship, as well as the opportunity to be exposed to new ideas that challenge the way I think about things or see problems… I believe it‚Äôs an effective way to explore and understand cultural differences. Many Americans and Canadians assume that their cultures are quite similar, but of course there are important differences too. These differences can sometimes surprise students, which can offer moments of reflection and discovery.
On his vision for the program’s future:
Our recent work has helped me to realize how much supporting students and scholarship remains at the heart of our mission and our impact. We’ve heard feedback that our members and stakeholders really enjoy hearing how our program has impacted students and scholars, and where they go after their time at Berkeley. So we will be devoting more time and attention to this moving forward.
On his favorite moment being a Bay Area Canadian:
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came to San Francisco, and my wife and I were invited to the reception. I brought along some kitschy lapel pins that a Canadian friend of mine had designed, featuring fun expat slogans like ‚ÄúThe Eh! Team‚ÄĚ, and ‚ÄúZed not Zee!‚ÄĚ I hoped to present one to Trudeau as a gift. Trudeau entered the room to applause. He was wearing a pastel blue suit that matched my own… I presented him with one of the pins, with a smiling maple leaf and the slogan, ‚ÄúEh to Zed!‚ÄĚ Trudeau placed a hand on my shoulder and said, ‚ÄúThank you for being a champion for Canada. You and your friends are the true diplomats here.¬†Ton pays te remercie.‚ÄĚ After pouring my heart into Canada for years, it was exactly what I needed to hear.
Hildebrand Fellow Jae Yeon Kim Publishes Study on Minority Coalition Building in US & Canada
Berkeley grad student and Hildebrand Fellowship recipient Jae Yeon Kim recently published a paper in¬†Studies in American Political Development, the flagship journal in its field. Entitled “Racism is Not Enough: Minority Coalition Building in San Francisco, Seattle, and Vancouver”, the study was based on research supported by his Hildebrand award and compares the formation of ethnic housing coalitions in three West Coast Chinatowns during the 1960s and ’70s.
According to Kim’s research, while all three cities had a legacy of anti-Asian racism, each produced a distinct movement shaped by local history and development pressure. Arguing that these factors were more important to determining inter-group cohesion than the simple shared experience of racism, Kim proposes that coalitions were strategically constructed and expanded. He contrasts the ethnic groups included or excluded in each coalition’s composition: in contrast to the largely Asian groups in the United States, the housing coalition that developed in Vancouver included European immigrant groups. Kim examines the reasons behind these divergences, and their implications on the understanding of the formation of minority coalitions.
Read the full study here.
Call for Papers: Canada, Near and Far
Deadline: April 1, 2021
In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States (ACSUS), the Association will host its 26th biennial conference, October 21-24, 2021, in Washington, DC. The conference is open to all proposals with a significant Canadian focus. We welcome papers and panel proposals from graduate students,
professors, independent scholars, and practitioners on all diverse and critical
perspectives related to the theme, ‚ÄėCanada: Near and Far‚Äô. How is Canada perceived and portrayed from outside its borders, and by the international community? In recognition of ACSUS‚Äôs 50 years work, what role do non-governmental agencies around the world play in shaping Canada‚Äôs relationships with the world?
Submissions must be received by April 1, 2021. Read the full requirements for the paper and logistical information for the associated conference here. For more information, please contact Dr. Christina Keppie at christina.keppie@wwu.edu.
Canadian Films Streaming At International Ocean Film Festival
July 30 – August 9 | Online
Film festival season continues with two award-winning Canadian documentaries covering critical issues facing Canada’s oceans. The films will be available to rent online from July 30 through August 9 as part of the 17th Annual International Ocean Film Festival, sponsored in part by the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco. Learn more about the festival and register for the virtual screenings¬†here.
The Mill (2019)
52 minutes; English.
Near a First Nations community in Nova Scotia, a paper mill had to stop in January the discharging of waste into noxious ponds that polluted both air and water for decades. The company proposed piping its effluent into the ocean, but met strong opposition from both the native community and fisherfolk. If the mill closes, others will also, putting over 10,000 jobs at risk. Resolving such conflicts is becoming a challenging worldwide problem.
Under Thin Ice (2019)
98 minutes; English.
Extreme divers Jill Heinerth and Mario Cyr explore above and below northern Canada’s ice sheet. It is a hunting ground for beluga whales and narwhals, for walruses and seals that depend on the ice to nurture their young, and for polar bears who live on the ice most of their lives. They all feed on a plethora of sea life, but as the ice melts more each year, their entire ecosystem has come under threat.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720