Tag Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

Disability rights expert Laverne Jacobs on COVID in Canada; visiting WWII internment sites in BC

An item from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Catching Up With Laverne Jacobs, 2014 Fulbright Chair in Canadian Studies
  • Photoblog: Visiting WWII-era internment sites in BC with Desirée Valadares
  • Affiliate event: COVID-19’s impact on people with disabilities in Canada
  • Affiliate event: Remembrance Day observances
Catching up with Professor Laverne Jacobs, 2014 Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Canadian Studies and Disability Rights Advocate
Professor Laverne Jacobs has built a career dedicated to human rights and equality. Since 2007, she has taught at the University of Windsor in Ontario, Canada. She now also serves as the Associate Dean of Research & Graduate Studies and is the founding director of the Law, Disability & Social Change Project at Windsor Law. Dr. Jacobs’ teaching and research center around disability, human rights and administrative law. Much of her work focuses on how people with disabilities interact with the administrative justice system and explores issues of equality and access to justice within those interactions.
In 2014, Dr. Jacobs was named the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Canadian Studies. She is returning to Berkeley (virtually) this Thursday, Oct. 29 for a special guest lecture on the challenges faced by persons with disabilities during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic (see details below under “Upcoming Events”). We asked Hildebrand Fellow Tyler Nodine to catch up with Professor Jacobs in advance of her lecture, and learn more about her current work and her thoughts on addressing issues at the intersection of disability rights, equality, and the current COVID-19 pandemic.
Highlights from the interview are below: read the full piece on our website here.
What was the focus of your research at Cal?
My research explored how people with disabilities and organizations dedicated to disability issues have consulted with government in order to make their voices heard in the development of laws that affect them. My project was prompted by the development in Canada of accessibility legislation-a new collaborative regulatory approach to addressing disability discrimination through the enactment of standards that began in Ontario in 2005 and that is now being picked up by provincial lawmakers across the country. During my time as the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair, I was interested in how people with disabilities participate in formal and informal consultation processes associated with developing laws that regulate their ability to participate in the community, as this was a central aspect of Canada’s new regulatory approach.
How did you choose Berkeley as the site of your research?
I was specifically interested in Berkeley – both the university and the city – because of its well-known, active community of disability rights scholars, lawyers and activists. As a person with a disability myself and someone who identifies as a member of the disability community, I was also excited to be in Berkeley. Moreover, I loved the idea of being affiliated with Canadian Studies at Cal because I wanted to maintain a connection with scholars and others who had an interest in what was taking place in Canada. Although my work had a comparative aspect, it was largely about the Canadian phenomenon.
One of my most memorable moments came from organizing a conference at Berkeley Law, which was generously supported by Canadian Studies, called Exploring Law, Disability and the Challenge of Equality in Canada and the United States. This was a wonderful opportunity to bring together colleagues from both Canada and the US to discuss disability and equality law theory and practice.
How has the COVID-19 pandemic influenced your research?
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant influence on my current research and teaching. I believe that in times of social uncertainty, scholars have a heightened obligation to serve the public by using their research and expertise to ensure that social issues are addressed in a way that brings in the considerations of everyone in society. COVID-19 has had a disproportionate impact on many vulnerable and marginalized populations, including people with disabilities. Sometimes the issues faced by marginalized groups are disregarded or even misunderstood and I think that as a scholar and a law professor, I have a responsibility to contribute to public debates by helping to clarify the issues and provide knowledge where I can.
What are the most pressing issues affecting the disability community during the COVID-19 pandemic, and how can we address these?
When it comes to people with disabilities, equality rights and the COVID-19 pandemic, two of the most important issues are access to appropriate healthcare and income insecurity. Hospital and other healthcare policies often place people with disabilities quite low on the list of who will receive care if triage is required because of a shortage of staff or supplies. People with disabilities are generally subject to the stigmatizing idea that the quality of their lives makes their lives not worth living. This stigma has been systemically embedded in triage protocols during the COVID-19 crisis. However, questions about who should live or die are much broader than utilitarian calculations; they should be subject to a human rights analysis. From a human rights approach, people with disabilities should have access to healthcare in a manner that is equal to everyone else. Human rights approaches can be found in international law, but also in domestic laws such as the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms which guarantees equality to people with disabilities.
Income insecurity is another major issue that brings to light the systemic social inequalities that people with disabilities experience daily and which have been exacerbated during COVID-19. If someone is unable to work due to disability, the amount of support that they receive is often not enough to keep them going during the pandemic, where the cost of living has risen significantly.
In terms of what we can do to address these issues, I think that it’s important to join voices with people with disabilities who are expressing concern. I think it’s crucial to be aware of the issues but to be led by the disability community in terms of ways to resolve them. And as scholars, I think it’s important to assist through research, and by facilitating discussions that raise awareness and change.
To learn more about Professor Jacob’s current research, sign up for her Oct. 29 lecture, “COVID-19 and Global Inequalities”. Learn more under “Upcoming Events”.
Photoblog: Hildebrand Fellow Desirée Valadares Records the Architectural Residues of Second World War Internment Landscapes
In April 2017, the British Columbia Register of Historic Places recognized more than 56 sites as part of the Japanese-Canadian Historic Places Project. The list included internment camps and the fishing, mining, and logging communities that confined Japanese-Canadians from 1942-1949. These traces provide an enduring testimony to the conditions that characterized daily life in these wartime spaces that confined “civilian enemy aliens” on the basis of their ethnic and racial identity, presumed loyalties, and alleged treasons.
In September 2017, the Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre in British Columbia held a “75th Anniversary Internment Bus Tour” in an effort to draw visibility and promote the study, management, preservation, and interpretation of these sites and their associated material culture. Joining them was Berkeley architecture Ph.D. student Desirée Valadares, who received a Canadian Studies Hildebrand Fellowship for her research into preservation of these sites across western North America.
Ms. Valadares, who won a 2020 Tanur Prize for Visual Sociology for her internment camp photography, took extensive photos of the sites as part of her project, which she presented during our Hildebrand Colloquium on October 20. With her cooperation, we are pleased to share an assortment of these moving photos with explanatory captions on our website for those who were unable to attend.
Upcoming Events
Affiliate Event: COVID-19 and Global Inequalities
Lecture | October 29 | 8:00 AM | Online | RSVP here
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has fallen disproportionately on marginalized communities, and among these, on people with disabilities. University of Windsor Law professor Laverne Jacobs, an expert in disability rights law who was Canadian Studies’ inaugural Fulbright Chair in 2014, will be part of a panel discussing the impact of the pandemic on Canadians with disabilities. Professor Jacobs will offer a critique of the situation in Canada through the lens of disability rights and equality law. Other participants will include Gerard Quinn (UN Special Rapporteur on People with Disabilities and professor emeritus, National University of Ireland, Galway) and Wanhong Zhang (Wuhan University, China).
The lecture is part of “COVID-19 and Global Inequalities”, an innovative online course offered by Berkeley Law featuring faculty and students from around the world. Following the lectures, participants will be able to discuss the social inequalities relating to COVID and disability in a variety of jurisdictions.
Affiliate Event: Annual Veterans Day Observance and Evensong
Event | November 8 | 4:00 PM | Online
All are invited to join in person or online for the Annual Veterans Day Observance and Evensong hosted by Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of Covina. The event will be streamed on the Facebook group of the Friends of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of Covina. Be sure to request to join the group by the end of the day on Friday, November 6.
Affiliate Event: Virtual Remembrance Day Service
Event | November 11 | 10:45 AM | Online | RSVP here
Join US Branch #25 of the Royal Canadian Legion, along with their comrades from other branches in the International Western USA Zone, as they present a socially distanced, virtual Remembrance Day Service from Liberty Cemetery in Petaluma, Greenlawn Cemetery in Colma, and Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood Park.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Research showcase tomorrow; plus, we’re in the news!, Canadian film, & more

Note these up-coming events, including one tomorrow, from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Event tomorrow: Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
  • In the news: Canadian newspaper covers our lecture on migrant worker rights
  • External event: Canadian films streaming online now
  • Affiliate event: COVID-19’s impact on people with disabilities in Canada
  • Affiliate event: Remembrance Day observances
Event Tomorrow:
Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
Colloquium | October 20 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP here
Learn about the research Canadian Studies funds through our Edward Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowships, as recipients present short overviews of their projects. Participating scholars are below; RSVP to canada@berkeley.edu.
Desirée Valadares, Ph.D. can., Architecture
“Idling No More: Reading Japanese Canadian World War II Road Camps Alongside Specters of Indigeneity on the Hope-Princeton Highway in British Columbia, Canada”
Desirée’s dissertation project is attentive to federal preservation policy and cultural heritage law as it intersects with unresolved Indigenous land claims/ Aboriginal title and Asian North American redress and war memory. She places her legal/geographic focus on two former U.S. territories (Hawai’i and Alaska) and unceded lands in Canada’s westernmost province (British Columbia).
Martha Herrera-Lasso Gonzalez, Ph.D. ’19 Performance Studies
“Regionalizing NAFTA: Theaters of Translation in Mexico City and Quebec”
Martha’s doctoral thesis outlines translation networks between the two Latin provinces of North America in the last thirty years, starting with the signing of NAFTA. In this research, she examines the theoretical and practical challenges of circulating performance texts across material and imagined spaces.
In the News
Migrant Farm Labour Talk Gets Write-up in Canadian Paper
A recent Canadian Studies colloquium on labour rights for migrant farmworkers in Canada was picked up by a paper across the border last week. The McGill Tribune, affiliated with McGill University, published a full recap of the October 6th lecture, which was entitled “Social Movements and Legal Mobilisation in Times of Crisis: Migrant Farm Worker Rights in Canada”. The featured speaker was Vasanthi Venkatesh, a professor of law at the University of Windsor who received a Hildebrand Fellowship from Canadian Studies for her doctoral research.
The story shows the expanded reach of Canadian Studies’ virtual colloquia, which now consistently reach audiences from across the United States and Canada. Read the full article online at The McGill Tribune.
Upcoming Events
Canadian Films Showing at (Virtual) Bay Area Film Festivals
Ongoing through Sunday, October 25
Three films from Canadian directors are streaming online this week from two Bay Area film festivals, thanks to the co-sponsorship of the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco.
Revisor (2020)
90 minutes; dir. Jeff Tudor.
Available now through Oct. 25.
The San Francisco Dance Film Festival is screening a BBC production of Revisor, the latest creation from award-winning Canadian dance-theatre makers Crystal Pite and Jonathon Young. Based on the play The Government Inspector by Nikolai Gogol, the film explores conflict, comedy and corruption in the potent relationship between language and the body. The screening also contains a bonus program, where co-creator Jonathan Young, dancer Tiffany Tregarthen, and journalist Claudia Bauer discuss the creative process and challenges behind bringing the work to life.
The UN Association Film Festival will also be screening two documentary films from Canadian directors, listed below. Each film will be available for free, but only to California residents and only on the date listed.
Oct. 21: Cirque du Cambodia (World Premiere)
85 min., dir. Joel Gershon.
Cirque du Cambodia follows the journeys of two teenagers from rural Cambodia living out a classic fantasy – running away and joining the circus. But it isn’t just any circus they dream about; they are determined to become the first Cambodians to perform with Cirque du Soleil.
Oct. 22: Picture of His Life (2019)
75 min., dir. Yonatan Nir & Dani Menkin
Legendary underwater stills photographer Amos Nachoum always dreamed of swimming underwater with a polar bear and capturing it face-to-face on film. He tried before and barely escaped with his life, but now, as he nears the end of his career, he is determined to give it one last shot.
Affiliate Event: COVID-19 and Global Inequalities
Lecture | October 29 | 8:00 AM | Online | RSVP here
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has fallen disproportionately on marginalized communities, and among these, on people with disabilities. University of Windsor Law professor Laverne Jacobs, an expert in disability rights law who was Canadian Studies’ inaugural Fulbright Chair in 2014, will be part of a panel discussing the impact of the pandemic on Canadians with disabilities. Professor Jacobs will offer a critique of the situation in Canada through the lens of disability rights and equality law. Other participants will include Gerard Quinn (UN Special Rapporteur on People with Disabilities and professor emeritus, National University of Ireland, Galway) and Wanhong Zhang (Wuhan University, China).
The lecture is part of “COVID-19 and Global Inequalities”, an innovative online course offered by Berkeley Law featuring faculty and students from around the world. Following the lectures, participants will be able to discuss the social inequalities relating to COVID and disability in a variety of jurisdictions.
Affiliate Event: Annual Veterans Day Observance and Evensong
Event | November 8 | 4:00 PM | Online
All are invited to join in person or online for the Annual Veterans Day Observance and Evensong hosted by Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of Covina. The event will be streamed on the Facebook group of the Friends of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of Covina. Be sure to request to join the group by the end of the day on Friday, November 6.
Affiliate Event: Virtual Remembrance Day Service
Event | November 11 | 10:45 AM | Online | RSVP here
Join US Branch #25 of the Royal Canadian Legion, along with their comrades from other branches in the International Western USA Zone, as they present a socially distanced, virtual Remembrance Day Service from Liberty Cemetery in Petaluma, Greenlawn Cemetery in Colma, and Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood Park.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

🍁 Happy Thanksgiving! Plus: Women’s History Month and upcoming events

An item from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.  And we sincerely appreciate their inclusion of our events in their newsletter.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Happy Thanksgiving from Canadian Studies!
  • Event next week: Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
  • In the news: October marks women’s rights anniversaries in Canada & Berkeley
  • Affiliate event: COVID-19’s impact on people with disabilities in Canada
  • Affiliate event: The pandemic experience in the US and Canada
  • Affiliate event: Remembrance Day observances
🍁 Happy Thanksgiving from Canadian Studies! 🍁
Dear Friends,
On behalf of the Canadian Studies Program, I would like to wish each of you a happy Thanksgiving. While we unfortunately can’t meet in person this year, I hope that you are able to spend this time with those closest to you. In an unpredictable world, it’s important to take the time to appreciate what we have, and reflect on what we’re grateful for. For us, we’re thankful for the support of our friends from across the United States and Canada. Whether you attend our colloquia or support our graduate students’ research, you make our work not only possible, but worthwhile.
Wishing you and yours a happy (and healthy) holiday,
Irene Bloemraad
Program Director 🦃
Event Next Week:
Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
Colloquium | October 20 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP here
Learn about the research Canadian Studies funds through our Edward Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowships, as recipients present short overviews of their projects. Participating scholars are Desirée Valadares, (“Idling No More: Reading Japanese Canadian World War II Road Camps Alongside Specters of Indigeneity on the Hope-Princeton Highway in British Columbia, Canada”) and Martha Herrera-Lasso Gonzalez (“Regionalizing NAFTA: Theaters of Translation in Mexico City and Quebec”).
October Marks Landmark Women’s Rights Anniversaries for Canada, UC Berkeley
Since 1992, October has been Women’s History Month in Canada. The date commemorates the landmark 1929 Persons Case, when the Privy Council ruled that the word “persons” in the 1867 British North American Act included women in response to a petition from five Alberta suffragists. This landmark ruling paved the way for the appointment of women to the Canadian Senate, and expanded other opportunities for women throughout Canada. In recognition of women’s contributions to the development of the country, the Government of Canada has created a timeline of important moments in Canadian women’s history from 1645-present, available here.
October 3 also marked a landmark in UC Berkeley history: the 150th anniversary of the unanimous approval of a resolution to allow young women to attend UC Berkeley on equal status with men. To celebrate, the campus has created a special 150 Years of Women at Berkeley website also highlighting the many contributions of women to the university. The collection features historical resources and articles on famous alumnae and affiliates from Rosa Scrivener, the first women to graduate from Berkeley in 1874, to 2020 Nobel Prize winning faculty member Jennifer Doudna.
Upcoming Events
Affiliate Event Tomorrow: The Pandemic Experience:
How Do Canada and the U.S. Compare?
Lecture | October 13 | 12:30 PM | Online | RSVP here
The next webinar of the virtual series, Conversations on Canada, organized by the Center for the Study of Canada & Institute on Quebec Studies, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh, will take place on Tuesday, October 13 at 3:30 pm ET (12:30 pm PT) – and features Mr. André Picard, Health Columnist and award-winning journalist for The Globe and Mail, presenting on “The Pandemic Experience: How Do Canada and the U.S. Compare?”
If you would like to join in, please register online: https://bit.ly/2RDSBrD
Affiliate Event: COVID-19 and Global Inequalities
Lecture | October 29 | 8:00 AM | Online | RSVP here
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has fallen disproportionately on marginalized communities, and among these, on people with disabilities. University of Windsor Law professor Laverne Jacobs, an expert in disability rights law who was Canadian Studies’ inaugural Fulbright Chair in 2014, will be part of a panel discussing the impact of the pandemic on Canadians with disabilities. Professor Jacobs will offer a critique of the situation in Canada through the lens of disability rights and equality law. Other participants will include Gerard Quinn (UN Special Rapporteur on People with Disabilities and professor emeritus, National University of Ireland, Galway) and Wanhong Zhang (Wuhan University, China).
The lecture is part of “COVID-19 and Global Inequalities”, an innovative online course offered by Berkeley Law featuring faculty and students from around the world. Following the lectures, participants will be able to discuss the social inequalities relating to COVID and disability in a variety of jurisdictions.
Affiliate Event: Annual Veterans Day Observance and Evensong
Event | November 8 | 4:00 PM | Online
All are invited to join in person or online for the Annual Veterans Day Observance and Evensong hosted by Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of Covina. The event will be streamed on the Facebook group of the Friends of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of Covina. Be sure to request to join the group by the end of the day on Friday, November 6.
Affiliate Event: Virtual Remembrance Day Service
Event | November 11 | 10:45 AM | Online | RSVP here
Join US Branch #25 of the Royal Canadian Legion, along with their comrades from other branches in the International Western USA Zone, as they present a socially distanced, virtual Remembrance Day Service from Liberty Cemetery in Petaluma, Greenlawn Cemetery in Colma, and Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood Park.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Tomorrow: Migrant worker rights during COVID; other October events & news

A reminder of these events, including one tomorrow, from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Event tomorrow: Migrant farmworker rights during COVID-19
  • Meet Canadian Studies: Board Member Kirk Miller
  • In the news: Ass’t VC David Jeu to retire from Berkeley, return to Canada
  • Upcoming event: Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
  • Upcoming event: COVID-19’s impact on people with disabilities in Canada
EVENT TOMORROW
Social Movements and Legal Mobilisation in Times of Crisis: Migrant Farm Worker Rights in Canada
Lecture | October 6 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP here
The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected migrant farm workers. Former Hildebrand Fellow Vasanthi Venkatesh, a professor of law at the University of Windsor specializing in social movements and immigration, gives context to the crisis by showing how the pandemic has overlaid itself onto existing systemic racial discrimination against migrant farm workers embedded in law and policy. She also shows how migrant farm worker advocates have responded to the crisis by exposing the racial capitalism of the Canadian agricultural economy, using radical narratives to challenge these systems.
RSVP to canada@berkeley.edu to receive a webcast link.
Meet Canadian Studies: Board Member Kirk Miller
Kirk Miller is an architect, developer, and longstanding supporter of the Canadian Studies program. A native of Alberta, Kirk moved to the United States to attend architectural school at UC Berkeley. After graduation, he established a successful architectural career in San Francisco, where he remains involved in regional development conversations and the Bay Area Canadian expatriate community. We talked to Kirk about his history with Canadian Studies and life as a Canadian in California; read the full interview here.
On his connection to Canada:
My grandparents immigrated to the Canadian prairies when the prairies were still part of the Northwest Territories. My maternal grandparents homesteaded. My paternal grandfather helped build the railroads.
I was raised in Red Deer, Alberta. At 17 years of age, after running out of challenges in Red Deer, I went “East” to the Collège Militaire Royal de Saint-Jean, 25 miles south of Montreal. I also studied political science and sociology at the University of Alberta. Not knowing what I wanted to do, I turned down an offer to pursue graduate studies in poli sci and taught high school for a couple of years. I moved to Quebec City. It was there I was further immersed in French Canadian culture, lived in the Vieux Quartier (within the walls), and studied architecture at Université Laval.
How he came to Berkeley:
Quebec was going through the “Quiet Revolution” while I was at Laval. That caused me to look for a new venue to continue my architectural studies. The UC Berkeley College of Environmental Design had just started a new program where the graduate school offered a professional master’s degree if you had an undergraduate degree in any field.
Coming to Berkeley changed my life. I was forced to think outside the box, or even without a box. Cal was coming off of the Free Speech Movement. It was (and is) a thought leader. The architectural curriculum had a plethora of advanced and thought-provoking courses.
Why he supports Canadian Studies:
I have always been very interested in research (both my wife and brother are academics). Given the depth, breadth, and interdependence of Canada’s relationship with the US, there is an increasing need to study all aspects of the relationship and to strengthen it. The Canadian Studies program is on the right path. Irene Bloemraad {Program Director} and David Stewart {Board Chair} have formed a synergistic leadership unit for the future of the program. Now it is a matter of implementation, and the adjustments that are made during that implementation.
In the News
Ass’t Vice Chancellor David Jeu to Retire from UC Berkeley
The Canadian Studies Program would like to wish a fond farewell to David Jeu, assistant vice chancellor of International Relations at UC Berkeley. David will be retiring at the end of this month after ten years of service to the university.
As head of the Office of International Relations, David has been instrumental in helping Canadian Studies form critical fundraising relationships and tap streams of philanthropy to support our program. David has always been a trusted partner for our program, thanks not only to his thirty years of experience in nonprofit management but also to his background as a Canadian. Prior to joining Berkeley, David was Director of Global Development at the University of Alberta and his connections in Canada have been invaluable to the program.
David and his family will be returning to Canada to rejoin their children and soon-to-be grandchild. He leaves behind a remarkable legacy at Berkeley, and we wish him well in his future endeavours.
Right: David Jeu and Canadian Studies program director Irene Bloemraad at a Canadian federal elections watch party at UC Berkeley, 2015.
Upcoming Events
Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
Colloquium | October 20 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP here
Learn about the research Canadian Studies funds through our Edward Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowships, as recipients present short overviews of their projects. Participating scholars are Desirée Valadares, (“Idling No More: Reading Japanese Canadian World War II Road Camps Alongside Specters of Indigeneity on the Hope-Princeton Highway in British Columbia, Canada”) and Martha Herrera-Lasso Gonzalez (“Regionalizing NAFTA: Theaters of Translation in Mexico City and Quebec”).
External Event: COVID-19 and Global Inequalities
Lecture | October 29 | Time TBA | Online
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has fallen disproportionately on marginalized communities, among these people with disabilities. University of Windsor Law professor Laverne Jacobs, an expert in disability rights law who was Canadian Studies’ inaugural Fulbright Chair in 2014, will be part of a panel discussing the impact of the pandemic on Canadians with disabilities.
The lecture is part of “COVID-19 and Global Inequalities”, an innovative online course offered by Berkeley Law featuring faculty and students from around the world. Following the lectures, participants will be able to discuss the social inequalities relating to COVID and disability in a variety of jurisdictions.
RSVP information will be announced at a later date.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Prof. Bloemraad interviewed on citizenship & belonging; Migrant worker rights during COVID

An update from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Event next week: Migrant farmworker rights during COVID-19
  • In the news: Prof. Bloemraad interviewed on immigration podcast
  • Upcoming event: Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
NEXT TUESDAY
Social Movements and Legal Mobilisation in Times of Crisis: Migrant Farm Worker Rights in Canada
Lecture | October 6 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP here
The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected migrant farm workers. Former Hildebrand Fellow Vasanthi Venkatesh, a professor of law at the University of Windsor specializing in social movements and immigration, gives context to the crisis by showing how the pandemic has overlaid itself onto existing systemic racial discrimination against migrant farm workers embedded in law and policy. She also shows how migrant farm worker advocates have responded to the crisis by exposing the racial capitalism of the Canadian agricultural economy, using radical narratives to challenge these systems.
RSVP to canada@berkeley.edu to receive a webcast link.
In the News
Prof. Bloemraad Talks Immigration on Popular Podcast
Canadian Studies director Irene Bloemraad recently appeared as a guest expert on the podcast How to Talk to [Mami & Papi] About Anything. The podcast is hosted by Juleyka Lantigua-Williams, a former producer of NPR’s Code Switch, and is aimed at adult children of immigrants, with a goal of “help{ing} them with difficult, but necessary conversations.”
Professor Bloemraad appears in Ep. 21, “The Mixed Privilege of Being A White Immigrant”. She provides context to one woman’s experience as the daughter of an immigrant in the United States and later an immigrant herself in Canada, exploring the complex meanings of citizenship and what it means to belong in a country. The official episode summary is below; listen online at talktomamipapi.com.
Vanessa’s mother moved from Germany to the U.S. as an adult. Vanessa, who was born in the U.S., immigrated to Canada and finds herself comparing their experiences in their adopted countries as she watches her home country from The North. Then, Juleyka speaks with a sociologist who puts citizenship and belonging into a larger context.
Upcoming Events
Hildebrand Graduate Research Colloquium
Colloquium | October 20 | 12:30 p.m. | Online – RSVP here
Learn about the research Canadian Studies funds through our Edward Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowships, as recipients present short overviews of their projects. Participating scholars are Desirée Valadares, (“Idling No More: Reading Japanese Canadian World War II Road Camps Alongside Specters of Indigeneity on the Hope-Princeton Highway in British Columbia, Canada”) and Martha Herrera-Lasso Gonzalez (“Regionalizing NAFTA: Theaters of Translation in Mexico City and Quebec”).
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720