Tag Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

Happy Thanksgiving (again!) ūü¶É Why the US & Canada celebrate on different days

An item from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements

In This Issue:

Upcoming Events

  • “COVID-19 and Delayed Political Polarization in Canada”

US-Canada Connections

  • Happy Thanksgiving (again)! Here’s why the US and Canada celebrate Thanksgiving on different days

Research Opportunities

  • Applications open: Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowship

External Events

  • World Cup Watch Party: Canada vs. Belgium
  • Lesher Center presents Canadian Brass

UPCOMING EVENTS

COVID-19 and Delayed Political Polarization in Canada

Wednesday, Nov. 30 | 12:30 pm PT | 223 Moses | RSVP here

The COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with large degrees of deep partisan polarization. In the US case, partisanship rapidly became associated with differences in the willingness to practice social distancing, to wear a mask, and eventually to get vaccinated. It was also associated with different risk perceptions about COVID and different relationships between COVID concern and evaluation of incumbents. The Canadian case is different. Partisan differences in evaluations of COVID and behavioural responses to it were small through the first year of the pandemic, but then began to widen. Drawing on more than 100,000 survey interviews with Canadians, we explore why political polarization over COVID was delayed.

Peter Loewen¬†is the director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and a professor of political science at the University of Toronto. He is also the director of the Policy, Elections & Representation Lab (PEARL), associate director of the Schwartz Reisman Institute, a Senior Fellow at Massey College, and a fellow with the Public Policy Forum. He received his B.A. from Mount Allison University and his Ph.D. from l‚ÄôUniversit√© de Montr√©al. Professor Loewen’s work has been published in numerous journals, and he is a regular contributor to the media, including the¬†New York Times,¬†Washington Post,¬†Globe & Mail,¬†Toronto Star¬†and¬†National Post.

This event is cosponsored by the Department of Political Science, the Goldman School of Public Policy, the School of Public Health, and the Institute of International Studies.

If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please let us know with as much advance notice as possible.

US-CANADA CONNECTIONS

Happy Thanksgiving (Again)!

Here’s Why the US and Canada Celebrate Thanksgiving on Different Days

This week, our American friends will celebrate Thanksgiving just weeks after their Canadian neighbors. It’s one of many cultural similarities that are just a¬†little¬†bit different on the other side of the border. But have you ever wondered why? While both holidays have a shared origin and many shared customs, each has been uniquely imprinted by the history of its host nation.

The origins of Thanksgiving in North America are much disputed, with many places claiming to be the birthplace of the holiday depending on what “counts” as a real Thanksgiving. The modern celebration is a combination of two traditional celebrations. One is the traditional harvest festivals common throughout both European and Indigenous American cultures. These festivities combined with the Christian practice of declaring a topical “day of thanksgiving” to thank God for some specific blessing, such as a good harvest, a safe voyage, or a victory in battle.

In the United States, the holiday is indelibly linked to the so-called “First Thanksgiving”, which occurred in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1621. As the popular story goes, the settlers (usually called “Pilgrims”) had only barely survived a terrible winter thanks to the assistance of the Native Wampanoag people. In gratitude, they shared their first harvest with their Wampanoag allies in a three-day feast of friendship.

However, the Plymouth celebration was not actually the first “Thanksgiving” in the United States, much less North America. (In fact, it was not even called a day of thanksgiving at the time.) Other thanksgiving celebrations were recorded earlier in Virginia and other American colonies; and in Canada, the English explorer Sir Martin Frobisher celebrated a thanksgiving dinner as early as 1578, to give thanks for his arrival in Newfoundland. It should be noted that many Native people also object to the prominence of the romanticized “First Thanksgiving” narrative, which they argue whitewashes the relationship between Native peoples and early American colonists.

Nevertheless, the story persisted. In the 18th and early 19th century, Thanksgiving remained a regional celebration mostly confined to New England. Following the American Revolution, Loyalist refugees spread their Thanksgiving customs into Canada, among them the Thanksgiving turkey. But the holiday remained largely unknown outside the Northeast until the 1840s, when the writer Sarah Josepha Hale began a 17-year campaign to make Thanksgiving a national holiday, in the belief that it would strengthen a common American identity. Her campaign succeeded in 1863, when President Lincoln declared a National Day of Thanksgiving in commemoration of the Union victory at Gettysburg, to be celebrated annually. Lincoln fixed the date on the last Thursday of November, where it has remained (more or less) ever since.

In Canada, the same tradition was revived by the newly-confederated government. The first federal Thanksgiving was declared in 1872 to celebrate the recovery of the Prince of Wales. It was made an annual holiday in 1879; however, Parliament did not set a date for the celebration, as it was intended that a unique theme would be chosen each year. In 1908, railway companies successfully lobbied the government to observe Thanksgiving on a Monday, presuming that more people would travel if they had a three-day weekend. It was not until 1957 that Parliament finally fixed the date on the second Monday in October.

Today, Thanksgiving remains a highly popular holiday on both sides of the US-Canada border and a cultural touchstone for both countries. Regional differences persist (do you eat pumpkin, apple, or pecan pie? Butter tarts or Nanaimo bars?), yet much as Sarah Hale intended, a common appreciation for family and friends continues to unite people across the continent in gratitude and friendship.

Images: 1) Thanksgiving turkey by Freepik, freepik.com. 2) The First Thanksgiving, 1621 by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES

Applications open: Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowship

Spring research deadline: December 9, 2022

The Canadian Studies Program is currently accepting applications for the Edward E. Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowship for Spring and Summer 2023. The application is open to UC Berkeley graduate students in any discipline whose work focuses primarily or comparatively on Canada. This fellowship is meant to cover direct research costs, with a typical award maximum of $5,000.

The application deadline for Spring 2023 research is Friday, December 9; applications for Summer 2023 should be submitted by March 10.

Please visit our website for more information and full eligibility criteria, and help us share this information with your friends, students, and networks!

EXTERNAL EVENTS

World Cup Watch Party: Canada vs. Belgium

Wednesday, November 23 | 10:00 am Р2:00 pm | San Francisco | Learn more

Join the San Francisco Expat Canadian Meetup Group to cheer on Canada as they play Belgium in Group F’s first game! Enjoy the game and socialize over lunch with your fellow Bay Area Canadians. Learn more at¬†Meetup.com.

Lesher Center Presents Canadian Brass

Friday, November 25 | 8:00 pm | Walnut Creek, CA

Buy tickets

Masters of concert presentations, Canadian Brass has developed a uniquely engaging stage presence and rapport with audiences. The concert will show the full range from trademark Baroque and Dixieland tunes to new compositions and arrangements created especially for them ‚Äď from formal classical presentation to music served up with lively dialogue and theatrical effects. The hallmark of any Canadian Brass performance is entertainment, spontaneity, virtuosity and, most of all, fun ‚Äď but never at the expense of the music. Whatever the style, the music is central and performed with utmost dedication, skill, and excellence.

With a discography of over 130 albums and an extensive world-wide touring schedule, Canadian Brass is an important pioneer in bringing brass music to mass audiences everywhere. Formed in Toronto in 1970, they have sold well over 2 million albums worldwide and are considered one of the world’s most popular brass ensembles.

Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
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Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Canada’s slow-growing COVID divisions; How speculation taxes affect immigrants

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements

In This Issue:

Upcoming Events

  • “COVID-19 and Delayed Political Polarization in Canada”

Program News

  • Hildebrand Fellow Taesoo Song investigates effects of Ontario’s housing speculation tax

Research Opportunities

  • Hildebrand Fellowship applications open!

External Events

  • “Home Away From Home: Reflections on the Canadian Expat Experience”

UPCOMING EVENTS

COVID-19 and Delayed Political Polarization in Canada

Wednesday, Nov. 30 | 12:30 pm PT | 223 Moses | RSVP here

The COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with large degrees of deep partisan polarization. In the US case, partisanship rapidly became associated with differences in the willingness to practice social distancing, to wear a mask, and eventually to get vaccinated. It was also associated with different risk perceptions about COVID and different relationships between COVID concern and evaluation of incumbents. The Canadian case is different. Partisan differences in evaluations of COVID and behavioural responses to it were small through the first year of the pandemic, but then began to widen. Drawing on more than 100,000 survey interviews with Canadians, we explore why political polarization over COVID was delayed.

Peter Loewen¬†is the director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and a professor of political science at the University of Toronto. He is also the director of the Policy, Elections & Representation Lab (PEARL), associate director of the Schwartz Reisman Institute, a Senior Fellow at Massey College, and a fellow with the Public Policy Forum. He received his B.A. from Mount Allison University and his Ph.D. from l‚ÄôUniversit√© de Montr√©al. Professor Loewen’s work has been published in numerous journals, and he is a regular contributor to the media, including the¬†New York Times,¬†Washington Post,¬†Globe & Mail,¬†Toronto Star¬†and¬†National Post.

If you require an accommodation to fully participate in this event, please let us know with as much advance notice as possible.

PROGRAM NEWS

Hildebrand Fellow Taesoo Song Investigates Effects of Ontario’s Housing Speculation Tax

By Taesoo Song

Taesoo Song is a Ph.D. candidate in the City & Regional Planning Program at UC Berkeley. He holds a B.A. in economics and an M.S. in urban planning and engineering from Yonsei University in Seoul. His research specializes in housing policy, gentrification and neighborhood changes, urban economic development, and migration. He received a Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowship in Summer 2022 to study the effectiveness – and effects – of Ontario’s tax on foreign speculators on the region housing market.

In July 2022, I had the opportunity to conduct a scoping study in Toronto with the generous support of the Canadian Studies Program. I originally aimed to study the impacts of the Ontario Non-Resident Speculation Tax (NRST) on the distribution of immigrants and inequality when I first arrived in Toronto. During my stay, however, I realized that the NRST could be reflecting an underlying tension in Ontario and Canada concerning immigrants, foreign capital, housing markets, and integration.

The Hildebrand Fellowship supported my flight, accommodations, and living expenses, as well as compensation for interviewees. My field research mainly involved networking with other housing and immigration researchers, conducting interviews with local real estate agents, and identifying and observing quantitative data. In Toronto, I was able to attend seminars and events on the local housing market and urban development, most of which were hosted by the School of Cities at the University of Toronto. I also networked with other scholars working on my research topic, including those at the University of Toronto, York University, and the Canadian Housing Mortgage Corporation (CMHC). These scholars provided me with valuable resources and insight into Canada’s history of immigration and housing policy, which allowed me to refine and expand my original questions and identify different types of quantitative data for housing research.

I also conducted four semi-structured interviews with real estate agents who mostly work with immigrants. I learned that these agents did not find believe that the NRST was effective at reducing housing costs. However, despite being immigrants themselves, they still supported it due to the belief that ‚ÄúCanadian land and housing belong to Canadians‚ÄĚ. Nevertheless, the interviewees were unable to clearly distinguish between immigrants and speculative foreigners. Moreover, they could not articulate to what extent foreign speculation affected the local housing market. This (un)perceived tension between foreign speculative investment, housing unaffordability, and immigration is where I hope to build on my dissertation.

Lastly, I was able to explore different parts of Toronto and North York, observing the

spatial distribution of different types of housing (single-family housing, condominiums, row houses, etc.), construction activities, and immigrant neighborhoods. I also gained a better understanding of the Greater Toronto Area’s transit networks, employment centers, and the development trajectories of different neighborhoods and how they are related with each other.

Based on my preliminary research activities, I hope to eventually write a dissertation on the foreign homebuyer taxes in British Columbia and Ontario, where I plan to investigate (1) the relationship between immigration and neighborhood change; (2) the political and economic motivations behind the taxes in the two provinces and their effects on the discourses concerning immigrants; and (3) the effectiveness of the taxes in curbing housing costs and the mechanisms through which they do so.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES

Now Accepting Applications for Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowships!

Spring research deadline: December 9, 2022

The Canadian Studies Program is currently accepting applications for the Edward E. Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowship for Spring and Summer 2023. The application is open to UC Berkeley graduate students in any discipline whose work focuses primarily or comparatively on Canada. This fellowship is meant to cover direct research costs, with a typical award maximum of $5,000.

The application deadline for Spring 2023 research is Friday, December 9; applications for Summer 2023 should be submitted by March 10.

Please visit our website for more information and full eligibility criteria, and help us share this information with your friends, students, and networks!

EXTERNAL EVENTS

Home Away From Home: Reflections on the Canadian Expat Experience

Thursday, November 17 | 4:00 pm PT | Online | RSVP

Western Washington University will host our board chair, David Stewart, for a conversation on his new memoir, True North, Down South: Tales of a Professional Canadian in America. Using a Canadian émigré lens, the essay collection entertains and educates readers about immigrant and national identity, cultural misunderstandings, and belonging in the modern world.

David Stewart is a Bay Area-based consultant, helping Canadian tech clusters connect into the local ecosystem. He is a former “chairmoose” of the Digital Moose Lounge, an association of Canadians in Silicon Valley, and the advisory board chair of Canadian Studies at UC Berkeley. His essays have received awards in San Francisco’s Soul-Making Keats literary competition and have appeared in¬†Potato Soup Journal,¬†Bewildering Stories, and¬†The Quiet Reader.

This event will be available via Zoom: to RSVP, click here. The talk is co-sponsored by the Center for Canadian-American Studies, the Institute for Global Engagement, and the Ray Wolpow Institute in partnership with the WWU Alumni Association.

Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
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Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

How do expats think about Canada? Plus: Berkeley, UT, & UBC ranked top globally in sustainability ūüćÉ

A newsletter from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.  And we continue to be grateful for the support shown by the Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley.


Canadian Studies Announcements

In This Issue:

Upcoming Events

  • Panel: “Constructing Canadian Identity from Abroad”

Program News

  • Last chance to get your 2022 remembrance poppy!
  • UC Berkeley, University of Toronto, and University of British Columba lead global sustainability rankings
  • Faculty affiliate Hidetaka Hirota delivers talk on 19th-Century Japanese immigration at University of Toronto

Research Opportunities

  • University of Waterloo postdoctoral funding opportunities
  • Applications open for Pierre Elliott Trudeau Scholarship

External Events

  • “Home Away From Home: Reflections on the Canadian Expat Experience”

UPCOMING EVENTS

Panel: “Constructing Canadian Identity from Abroad”

Wednesday, November 9 | 2:30 pm PT | 223 Moses | RSVP here

Celebrate 40 years of Canadian Studies at Berkeley with a lively discussion on how Canadian expatriates think about their home country, and contribute to Canada’s perception of itself. The conversation will feature contributors to the recently-published book¬†The Construction of Canadian Identity from Abroad, a collection of essays that explores the topic from both a theoretical and personal perspective.

The panel will be moderated by the volume’s co-editor,¬†Christopher Kirkey, director of the Center for the Study of Canada and Institute on Qu√©bec Studies at the SUNY Plattsburgh. Panelists will include Berkeley Canadian Studies Program director¬†Irene Bloemraad;¬†volume co-editor¬†Richard Nimijean,¬†Undergraduate Supervisor of Canadian Studies at Carleton University;¬†Julie Burelle, an expert on Indigenous, Quebec, and performance studies at UC San Diego. Also joining the panel will be Berkeley Canadian Studies Advisory Board chair¬†David Stewart, who recently published his own memoir (see below).

Please note that this event takes place later than our normal Colloquium time.

PROGRAM NEWS

Last Chance to Get Your 2022 Remembrance Poppy!

 

Don’t forget to get your official Remembrance Day poppy before Friday! Dating back to the First World War, the¬†National Poppy Campaign¬†honours Canada’s war veterans, and commemorates those who fell. Canadian Studies is proud to partner with¬†Royal Canadian Legion, US Branch #25¬†to serve as the official distributor of remembrance poppies for the Berkeley community.

Interested persons may pick up their poppies at our office in 213 Moses Hall on the UC Berkeley campus, weekdays between 9am-5pm. While the poppy is free, the Legion gratefully accepts donations towards their Poppy Fund, which directly supports Canadian veterans and their families through the Legion National Foundation.

UC Berkeley, University of Toronto, and University of British Columbia lead global sustainability rankings

A new report has rated UC Berkeley and two Canadian universities as the most sustainable of 700 global institutions of higher education surveyed. The report, published by QS World University Rankings, is the first of its kind for the well-established British publication, and evaluated institutions on social and environmental sustainability performance. Berkeley received the number one spot, with a perfect score of 100 in both social impact and environmental impact rankings. It was followed closely by the University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia, which ranked overall #2 and #3.

Faculty Affiliate Hidetaka Hirota Delivers Talk on 19th-Century Japanese Immigration at University of Toronto

Canadian Studies faculty affiliate Hidetaka Hirota, an associate professor of history at UC Berkeley, travelled to Canada recently to deliver a lecture on his research at the University of Toronto. The lecture, titled “The Transnational Business, Racial Politics, and Diplomacy of Japanese Border Crossing in North America“, was sponsored by the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies. Drawing from his current book project that examines the tensions between nativism and demand for foreign labor in the United States, his presentation explored the social, legal, and diplomatic contexts in which Japanese migration to North America was contested at the turn of the twentieth century.

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES

University of Waterloo Postdoctoral Funding Opportunities

Application deadline: December 1, 2022

The University of Waterloo is accepting applications for its 2023 postdoctoral funding competition. Postdoctoral scholars at the University of Waterloo are a vital component in supporting the overall intellectual strength of the institution. They play an active role in planning for and carrying out Waterloo’s research programs, build alliances and intellectual bridges to other institutions and provide mentorship to our students. In return, Waterloo offers postdoctoral scholars a supportive infrastructure and mechanisms for advancing their goals. Opportunities are available in the following programs:

Applicants are encouraged to review the eligibility criteria for these programs before submitting their application. Applicants may only apply to one of the three funding opportunities and must have endorsement from a University of Waterloo faculty member prior to applying. To learn more about the competition and apply, click here.

Applications Open: Pierre Elliott Trudeau Scholarship

Application deadline: December 2, 2022

The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation aims to empower scholars to have meaningful impact in their institutions and communities. This three-year leadership program is designed to train engaged leaders, equipping individuals with the skills to translate their ideas into action, for the betterment of their communities, Canada, and the world. Scholars are selected each year and receive leadership training in the context of Brave Spaces, in addition to generous funding for their studies. Foundation Scholars receive:

  • Up to $40,000 per year for three years to cover tuition and reasonable living expenses to focus on their doctoral studies and the Foundation’s leadership program
  • Up to $20,000 per year for three years, for the learning of languages, for travel and accommodations for the Foundation’s leadership program and for research, networking, and travel related to their doctoral research
  • Membership in a vibrant community of scholars, mentors, and fellows, all of whom are leaders in their respective disciplines and sectors
  • Leadership training from mentors and fellows, including unique experiential learning opportunities that enrich and complement their academic experience
  • Lifelong membership in the Foundation‚Äôs alumni network.

To apply to the Scholarship, you must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  1. You must be already accepted into or in year one or two of a full-time doctoral program, and expected to complete your doctoral studies in 2026 or later.
  2. Your field of study is broadly related to the humanities or human sciences of direct relevance to the future of Canada.
  3. Your doctoral work must relate to at least one of the Foundation’s Four Themes: Human Rights and Dignity, Responsible Citizenship, Canada and the World, People and their Natural Environment.
  4. Be a Canadian citizen studying at a Canadian or foreign institution, or a non-Canadian (permanent resident of Canada or foreign national) enrolled in a doctoral program at a Canadian institution.

To learn more about the program and apply, visit the¬†Foundation’s website.

EXTERNAL EVENTS

Home Away From Home: Reflections on the Canadian Expat Experience

Thursday, November 17 | 4:00 pm PT | Online | RSVP

Western Washington University will host our board chair, David Stewart, for a conversation on his new memoir, True North, Down South: Tales of a Professional Canadian in America. Using a Canadian émigré lens, the essay collection entertains and educates readers about immigrant and national identity, cultural misunderstandings, and belonging in the modern world.

David Stewart is a Bay Area-based consultant, helping Canadian tech clusters connect into the local ecosystem. He is a former “chairmoose” of the Digital Moose Lounge, an association of Canadians in Silicon Valley, and the advisory board chair of Canadian Studies at UC Berkeley. His essays have received awards in San Francisco’s Soul-Making Keats literary competition and have appeared in¬†Potato Soup Journal,¬†Bewildering Stories, and¬†The Quiet Reader.

This event will be available via Zoom: to RSVP, click here. The talk is co-sponsored by the Center for Canadian-American Studies, the Institute for Global Engagement, and the Ray Wolpow Institute in partnership with the WWU Alumni Association.

Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Facebook  Twitter
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Happy Halloween! ūüéÉ Plus, Canada as seen by expats; get your remembrance poppy!

An update from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.  We thank the Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley for being a poppy distribution site and for publicizing our annual Remembrance Day service.


Canadian Studies Announcements

In This Issue:

Upcoming Events

  • Panel: “Constructing Canadian Identity from Abroad”

Program News

  • Get your 2022 remembrance poppy

Canadian Culture

  • Happy Halloween!

Research Opportunities

  • Call for Papers: Context and Meaning XXII – Scandal

 

External Events

  • Canadian films at the 47th American Indian Film Festival
  • Remembrance Day service
  • Sin La Habana¬†at the San Francisco Dance Film Festival

UPCOMING EVENTS

Panel: “Constructing Canadian Identity from Abroad”

Wednesday, November 9 | 2:30 pm PT | 223 Moses | RSVP here

Celebrate 40 years of Canadian Studies at Berkeley with a lively discussion on how Canadian expatriates think about their home country, and contribute to Canada’s perception of itself. The conversation will feature contributors to the recently-published book¬†The Construction of Canadian Identity from Abroad, a collection of essays that explores the topic from both a theoretical and personal perspective.

The panel will be moderated by the volume’s editor,¬†Christopher Kirkey, director of the Center for the Study of Canada and Institute on Qu√©bec Studies at the SUNY Plattsburgh. Panelists will include Berkeley Canadian Studies Program director¬†Irene Bloemraad;¬†Richard Nimijean,¬†Undergraduate Supervisor of Canadian Studies at Carleton University;¬†Julie Burelle, an expert on Indigenous, Quebec, and performance studies at UC San Diego. Also joining the panel will be Berkeley Canadian Studies Advisory Board chair¬†David Stewart, who recently published his own memoir (see below).

Please note that this event takes place later than our normal Colloquium time.

PROGRAM NEWS

Get Your 2022 Remembrance Poppy!

 

On October 28, the Royal Canadian Legion kicked off its¬†2022 National Poppy Campaign. Dating back to the First World War, the traditional red remembrance poppy honours Canada’s war veterans, and commemorates those who fell. Canadian Studies is proud to partner with¬†Royal Canadian Legion, US Branch #25¬†to serve as an official distributor of remembrance poppies for the Berkeley community.

Interested persons may pick up their poppies at our office in 213 Moses Hall on the UC Berkeley campus, weekdays between 9am-5pm. While the poppy is free, the Legion gratefully accepts donations towards their Poppy Fund, which directly supports Canadian veterans and their families through the Legion National Foundation.

CANADIAN CULTURE

Happy Halloween!¬†ūüéÉ

Today, children and adults across the United States and Canada will celebrate Halloween, a festive celebration of all things spooky. But while Halloween is often thought of as an “American” holiday, did you know that many of our most cherished holiday traditions may be more Canadian than you knew?

The celebration of Halloween originates in Scotland and Ireland. Scholars theorize that it has its roots in the ancient festival Samhain, which marked the start of winter. The ancient Celts believed that on that day, the boundaries between the worlds were thinnest, allowing fairies and spirits of the dead to enter our world and cause mischief. Some people left offerings of food to appease them, while others wore disguises to scare or fool evil ghosts. By the 16th century, these two traditions combined into “guising”, an early form of trick-or-treating in costume. (A similar Christmas tradition,¬†mummering, is still celebrated in Newfoundland.) After the Christianization of Britain and Ireland, Samhain was likely assimilated into the Christian feast of All Hallow’s Eve, from which Halloween draws its modern name.

Irish and Scottish immigrants brought these traditions to North America in the 19th century, and by the early 1900s the celebration was well -established across Canada. Many staple Halloween customs were actually reported in Canada before the United States. According to the¬†Canadian Encyclopedia, the wearing of Halloween costumes was first recorded in Vancouver in 1898, while the first recorded use of the term “trick or treat” was in Lethbridge, Alberta, in 1927. Even first recorded practice of trick-or-treating (then still called “guising”) in North America was reported in Kingston, Ontario in 1911.

But what about that Halloween icon, the Jack-o’-lantern? While myths abound about its origin, the practice of carving vegetable lanterns with grotesque faces began in Ireland or Scotland, perhaps to ward off evil spirits. However, in Europe, these lanterns were usually made from turnips or other root vegetables. Immigrants to the Americas, lacking these vegetables, turned instead to the native pumpkin – giving us today’s crookedly-smiling Jack-o’-lantern.

Image: Halloween ghost vector by pikisuperstar on Freepik.com

RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES

Call for Papers: Context and Meaning XXII ‚Äď Scandal

Submission deadline: November 17, 2022

Conference Dates: February 2-4, 2023

The Graduate Visual Culture Association (GVCA) at Queen’s University is seeking submissions for a graduate research conference exploring the intersections of art and Scandal. Hosted by the Department of Art History and Art Conservation and the GVCA, this year’s hybrid conference will take place from Thursday, February 2nd to Saturday, February 4th, 2023.

This year’s conference engages broadly with the complex relationship between art and scandal. A scandal can be broadly defined as reactions, outrage, or shock, in response to people or events that are perceived to have deviated from socio-cultural norms. Scandals may be false, factual, or a combination of both. Sociologist and expert on scandal, Ari Adut, presents four main concepts associated with scandal: scandals are public events reliant on publicity; scandals have become so commonplace that it can be difficult to recognize them; artistic creativity is linked to scandal; and, scandals can provide opportunities for those who participate in them. While scandal is the revealing of wrongdoing, the act of covering them up can also itself be a scandal. Art world scandals may relate to methods of production, subject or style, contexts of display or lack thereof, and artistic personas, influenced by politics, society, religion, money, and morality.

If you are interested in participating in Context and Meaning XXII, please click here to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words with the title of your paper, and a 150-word bio. You will be prompted to indicate your preference to present either in-person or online. Presenters will be asked to deliver a 15-minute presentation that will be followed by a panel discussion period.

The deadline to submit an abstract will be Thursday, November 17th, 2022. In order to allow for the most applicants this is the last possible submission deadline. Thank you to all who apply!

EXTERNAL EVENTS

47th American Indian Film Festival (AIFF)

November 4-12 | San Francisco

The Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco is pleased to support the 47th annual American Indian Film Festival (AIFF), November 4-12, 2022 in San Francisco. Since its inception in 1975, the mission of AIFF has steadfastly been the cultural exchange Рvia the power of film Рof Native American and Canada’s First Nations cultures. While the content is by, for and about Indigenous storytellers, AIFF remains a film festival for all audiences Рfrom filmmakers whose intent is to inform, educate, enlighten and entertain all viewers.

The Festival features several films from First Nations filmmakers:

To view the full film schedule and purchase tickets, click here.

Remembrance Day Service

Saturday, November 5 | 11:00 am | Petaluma, CA | RSVP here

Join US Branch 25 of the Royal Canadian Legion, representing the San Francisco Bay Area, for their annual Remembrance Day service from Liberty Cemetery in Petaluma. Guests are welcome at the cemetery. The service will also be streamed live and recorded through Zoom webinar. Please contact Michael Barbour at the Royal Canadian Legion if you plan to attend.

Sin La Habana at the San Francisco Dance Film Festival

Sunday, November 6 | 3:30 pm | San Francisco | Buy tickets

The Consulate General of Canada is supporting the screening of the Canadian narrative film, Sin La Habana on Saturday, November 6 at the Brava Theater in San Francisco, as part of the 13th annual San Francisco Dance Film Festival. The film tells the story of Leonardo, a classical dancer, and Sara, a lawyer, who are young, beautiful and in love. They’re also ambitious, but their dreams are trapped by Cuba’s closed borders. Their ticket to a brighter future lies with Nasim, an Iranian-born Canadian tourist with a taste for the exotic, but she has her own demons to face. Power, money, and creativity intertwine in a passionate love triangle with a hint of destiny, and cultures clash in a torrid dance between Quebec’s winter and Havana’s sultry Malecón.

For more information or to purchase tickets, click here.

Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
WEBSITE | EMAIL | DONATE
Facebook  Twitter
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720