Tag Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

Berkeley (and US) commit to international engagement: Indigenous arts workshop Thursday

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Event next week: Social Diversity, Partisan Identity & the 2019 Canadian Election
  • Important travel update: Negative COVID test now required to enter the US
  • Berkeley unveils new “Principles of International Engagements”
  • US-Canada relations looking up – but challenges remain ahead
  • Last chance to see choral performance Messiah/Complex for free
  • Talk on Indigenous arts with Messiah/Complex co-director Reneltta Arluk
  • Affiliate event in French: “Le système d’immigration canadien”
Event Next Week
Social Diversity, Partisan Identities and the 2019 Canadian Election
February 2 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Join Professor Allison Harell as she explores the ways in which intergroup dynamics structure vote choice in Canada. Drawing on the 2019 Canadian Election Study, she focuses in particular on how partisan identities and political preferences are anchored in key social cleavages in Canada that structured the way in which the 2019 election campaign played out.
Allison Harell is a professor of political science at the Université du Québec à Montréal and holds the UQAM Research Chair in the Political Psychology of Social Solidarity. She is interested in how social diversity affects the political world, especially the ways in which prejudice influences public opinion formation. Her current research focuses on how intergroup relations influence support for both economic and political solidarity, as well as how intergroup perceptions spill over into electoral politics.
Travel Update: Negative COVID-19 Test Now Required to Enter US by Air
The United States Government has issued an order that as of tomorrow, January 26, all travellers over two year of age must provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test when entering the country by air. The test must be taken within 72 hours of departure, and documentation must be provided before boarding. This order includes travellers who are merely transiting through the United States to another destination. Those authorized to remain in the United States are requested to comply with a 10-day quarantine. Learn more and read the full order here.
UC Berkeley Issues New “Principles of International Engagement”
The UC Berkeley Global Engagement Office has announced a new set of guiding principles that affirm the university’s “unequivocal commitment” to international collaboration and leadership. Under the new principles, the university continues to advocate the free exchange of ideas and people across national borders in a spirit of academic enquiry. The university also commits to creating a welcoming environment for cross-cultural exchange, and to fostering new partnerships and research agreements with international institutions.
The Canadian Studies Program welcomes these new principles, which directly align with our own values and aims.
US-Canada Relationship on Upswing – But Challenges Remain Ahead
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office issued an official statement last week congratulating Joseph Biden on his inauguration as the 46th President of the United States. The Prime Minister stressed the United States and Canada’s longstanding friendship and values and policy goals shared with the new administration. Both leaders seek a reset of relations that came under heavy strain in recent years, and Biden chose Trudeau for his first official call with a foreign leader. However, policy disagreements persist despite the good feelings – in their call, Trudeau expressed “disappointment” with Biden over the president’s decision to cancel the Keystone XL pipeline in one of his first executive actions. Nevertheless, both leaders agreed to meet next month to discuss ways to improve cross-border cooperation, particularly with regards to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic, which both governments consider a “fundamental priority”.
Affiliate/External Events
Last Chance to Stream Messiah/Complex for Free
Ends January 31 | Stream here
Toronto-based opera collective Against the Grain Theater’s award-winning Messiah/Complex wraps up its virtual run this Sunday, January 31. Directed by Joel Ivany and Reneltta Arluk, it presents a fresh take on Handel’s classic Messiah that has garnered praise from critics – including our own reviewer! The performance is available to stream free through this weekend on the company’s website.
Ataramik (Always): A Conversation with Reneltta Arluk
January 28 | 3:00 p.m. PT / 12:00 p.m. ET | RSVP here
The Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University and the Scott Polar Research Institute at the University of Cambridge invite you to join their Arctic Environmental Humanities Workshop series, co-convened by Boston University’s Adriana Craciun (a past Canadian Studies colloquium speaker) and Cambridge’s Michael Bravo.
For Thursday’s workshop, they will be joined by Reneltta Arluk (Inuvialuit, Dene, Cree), the Director of Indigenous Arts at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, and director of the Akpik Theatre. She was the first Inuk and Indigenous woman to direct at the Stratford Festival, where she won the 2017 Tyrone Guthrie – Derek F. Mitchell Artistic Director’s Award. She also co-directed the award-winning and innovative 2020 performance Messiah/Complex, which highlights Indigenous singers and languages of Canada.
Registration is required and free—once registered, you will receive a secure zoom link to hear the presentation and join the conversation afterwards. Learn more and RSVP here.
Conférence: “Le système d’immigration canadien”
February 3 | 4:30 p.m. PT | RSVP here
Note: This event will be conducted in French.
L’immigration a joué un rôle très important dans l’histoire et le développement du Canada en tant que pays. Dans ce programme virtuel, l’Alliance française de Berkeley accueillera deux experts pour mener une discussion sur le système d’immigration du Canada. Ils présenteront comment le système canadien se compare à celui des États-Unis, les avantages et les possibilités associés à l’immigration, ainsi que les défis potentiels.
Les panelistes seront Irene Bloemraad, une sociologue politique et directrice du Programme d’études canadiennes à l’Université de Californie à Berkeley, et Yves Beaulieu, le consul pour la politique étrangère et la diplomatie au consulat général du Canada à San Francisco.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Event: social diversity & partisan identity; An “intellectual lifeline” for Bay Area Canadians

An item from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Upcoming event: Social Diversity, Partisan Identity & the 2019 Canadian Election
  • Meet Canadian Studies: Board Member Rosann Greenspan
  • Affiliate event in French: “Le système d’immigration canadien”
Upcoming Event
Social Diversity, Partisan Identities and the 2019 Canadian Election
February 2 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Join Professor Allison Harell as she explores the ways in which intergroup dynamics structure vote choice in Canada. Drawing on the 2019 Canadian Election Study, she focuses in particular on how partisan identities and political preferences are anchored in key social cleavages in Canada that structured the way in which the 2019 election campaign played out.
Allison Harell holds the UQAM Research Chair in the Political Psychology of Social Solidarity. She is interested in how social diversity affects the political world, especially the ways in which prejudice influences public opinion formation. Her current research focuses on how intergroup relations influence support for both economic and political solidarity, as well as how intergroup perceptions spill over into electoral politics.
Meet Canadian Studies: Board Member Rosann Greenspan
Dr. Rosann Greenspan may be one of the Canadian Studies Program’s newest board members, but her connections with Berkeley and Canadian Studies are longstanding. Hailing from Toronto, Rosann moved to Berkeley to attend graduate school and has lived there (mostly) ever since. Prior to her retirement in 2019, she served as executive director of the Center for the Study of Law and Society at UC Berkeley. Read below to learn what motivated her to join the Canadian Studies advisory board, and why she thinks the program is a valuable resource for all Canadians in the Bay Area; find the full interview on our website here.
What’s your connection to Canada?
I was born and raised in Niagara Falls, Ontario. After attending college in the States (Vassar and Yale), I returned to Canada and received my M.A. at the University of Toronto, worked for the Law Reform Commission of Canada in Ottawa, spent some time as a grad student at McGill, built a log cabin in the Yukon, and lived in the beach town of White Rock, B.C., among other adventures. I moved to Berkeley for a Ph.D. in the then-fledgling interdisciplinary program Jurisprudence and Social Policy, which seemed tailor-made for my interests. Other than a few years in the ’90s in Washington, DC as a U.S. Supreme Court Fellow and as research director of the Police Foundation, I have lived in Berkeley and been connected to UC Berkeley since 1980. My family are all in Toronto and I return there frequently, several times a year.
Why do you support Canadian Studies?
Canadian Studies provides an intellectual lifeline to Canadians at UC Berkeley and throughout the Bay Area. Whether visiting scholars passing through only for a few months, or transplants like myself who have settled here, I’ve yet to meet a Canadian affiliated with UC Berkeley who, once connected to the Canadian Studies Program, isn’t hooked! It provides a hub for Canadians whose work may not be obviously related but who crave the connection. But beyond that, Canadian scholarship, as Irene’s marvelous expansion of speakers has shown, leads the way in cutting edge thinking in so many fields. I have no doubt that more and more scholars across the university are turning their attention to what Canadian Studies has to offer.
Tell us a fun anecdote about being Canadian in the Bay Area.
I remember the day I drove into Berkeley in August 1980, after a solo cross-country drive that began in Montreal. As a foreign student, the one location I knew about was International House, where the Berkeley International Office was. I thought I might be able to rent a room there while I looked for an apartment. So I drove from I-80 up University Avenue and into the main gate of the university. I spoke to the gatekeeper, and asked him for directions to Piedmont Avenue. Only I pronounced it as you would in Montreal – I think it must have sounded something like “Peeyaymoan” in my poor accent. I wasn’t being fancy, I honestly couldn’t remember how to say it in English. He had no idea what I was saying. So he helpfully asked where I was trying to go and I told him International House and off I went.
Affiliate Event
Conférence: “Le système d’immigration canadien”
February 3 | 4:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Note: This event will be conducted in French.
L’immigration a joué un rôle très important dans l’histoire et le développement du Canada en tant que pays. Dans ce programme virtuel, l’Alliance française de Berkeley accueillera deux experts pour mener une discussion sur le système d’immigration du Canada. Ils présenteront comment le système canadien se compare à celui des États-Unis, les avantages et les possibilités associés à l’immigration, ainsi que les défis potentiels.
Les panelistes seront Irene Bloemraad, une sociologue politique et directrice du Programme d’études canadiennes à l’Université de Californie à Berkeley, et Yves Beaulieu, le consul pour la politique étrangère et la diplomatie au consulat général du Canada à San Francisco.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Happy New Year! Check out our spring event lineup

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Our spring event lineup is here!
  • Important travel update: Negative COVID test now required to enter Canada
  • Applications open: “Connecting Perspectives: A Cross-Border Art Initiative”
  • Call for papers: “US, Canada, Quebec and the Problem of the Border”
  • Arts review + video: Against the Grain Theater’s Messiah/Complex
  • Affiliate event in French: “Le système d’immigration canadien”
Our Spring Event Lineup is Here!
Social Diversity, Partisan Identities and the 2019 Canadian Election
February 2 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Join Professor Allison Harell as she explores the ways in which intergroup dynamics structure vote choice in Canada. Drawing on the 2019 Canadian Election Study, she focuses in particular on how partisan identities and political preferences are anchored in key social cleavages in Canada that structured the way in which the 2019 election campaign played out.
Allison Harell holds the UQAM Research Chair in the Political Psychology of Social Solidarity. She is interested in how social diversity affects the political world, especially the ways in which prejudice influences public opinion formation. Her current research focuses on how intergroup relations influence support for both economic and political solidarity, as well as how intergroup perceptions spill over into electoral politics.
Film Talk: “The Blinding Sea”
March 9 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Filmmaker George Tombs will discuss his recent documentary The Blinding Sea. The film chronicles the life of Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen (1872-1928), the first person to lead a successful expedition through the Northwest Passage. It evokes the joys, sorrows, relationships and missed opportunities in the life of Amundsen, who disappeared mysteriously without trace during a polar flight in 1928. The film places a special focus on Amundsen’s relations with the Indigenous people he encountered on his voyages, particularly the Inuit.
A link to the documentary will be sent in advance of the event. We request all participants watch the documentary prior joining the discussion.
George Tombs is an award-winning author and filmmaker based in Montreal, who works in both English and French. He is currently writing a biography of Roald Amundsen. His past works include Robber Baron, a biography of controversial media tycoon Conrad Black, and his recent humorous novel Mind the Gap.
Panel Discussion: The Canadian Healthcare System:
A Model for the US?
April 6 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Most Canadians are proud of their national healthcare system, widely considered one of the best in the world. With healthcare again at the center of US policy debate, a growing number of Americans are holding up Canada as a model for a potential US single-payer system. However, for many others a “Canadian” system conjures images of long waits and rationing. Join Canadian Studies for a special panel exploring how Canada’s healthcare system really works, and why its perception in the US is so polarized.
Gregory Marchildon is a professor of comparative healthcare at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He specializes in Canada’s healthcare system and has written extensively on comparative policy.
Amanda Aronczyk is a journalist and host of the NPR show Planet Money. Her recent episode “Frame Canada” explored the US insurance lobby’s long-running PR campaign against Canada’s healthcare system to block major healthcare reform.
Psychedelics, eh? Canada’s Role in a Psychedelic Renaissance
April 27 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
In the 1950’s, the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was on the cutting edge of research into hallucinogenic drugs. Under the province’s massive healthcare reforms, researchers received grants to pursue LSD treatments they thought could revolutionize psychiatry. What do these experiments say about Canada’s healthcare system and society at the time? And what can we learn from the program’s successes and failures at a time when psychedelics are attracting renewed scientific and public interest?
Erika Dyck is the Canada Research Chair in the History of Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan. She specializes in the history of psychiatry, and has written several books on the history of psychedelic research and eugenics in Canada.
Travel Update: Negative COVID-19 test now required to enter Canada by air
The Government of Canada has issued a directive that as of January 7, all travellers over five year old must provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test when entering the country by air. The test must be taken within 72 hours of departure, and documentation must be provided at the time of boarding. Travellers authorized to enter Canada must still complete the full, mandatory 14-day quarantine.
Applications Open for Cross-Border Art Project
Canada’s diplomatic missions in the United States are proud to partner with the Toronto-based Social Distancing Festival to present a new collaborative, interdisciplinary series called Connecting Perspectives: A Cross-Border Art Initiative, which will bring together artists who identify as Black, Indigenous and/or People of Colour in Canada and the United States to create collaborative projects that draw inspiration from the theme “Art Today”.
All chosen artists who complete a collaborative art piece for the project will receive USD $1000, as well as USD $200 for expenses. For more information about the process and eligibility requirements, please click here. The deadline for submissions is January 22, 2021.
Call for Papers: “United States, Canada, Quebec and the Problem of the Border”
The Canadian Studies and American Studies programs at Bridgewater State University invite submissions for their rescheduled interdisciplinary student research conference on the subject “United States, Canada, Quebec and the Problem of the Border” to be held live in virtual format on Friday, April 2, 2021. Proposals from undergraduate university students in the United States and Canada on all subjects are welcome.
The revised deadline for proposals is Monday, February 15, 2021. Please see here for full eligibility criteria and submission details.
Arts Review + Video: Messiah/Complex by Against the Grain Theater
Last month, award-winning Toronto-based opera collective Against the Grain Theater released a new performance of the holiday classic, Handel’s Messiah – with a Canadian twist. Titled Messiah/Complex, the updated performance is fresh take on an iconic piece that celebrates Canada’s diversity, including passages sung by Indigenous singers and members of other minority communities.
Former Berkeley staff member Elsa Tranter wrote a glowing review of the piece for Canadian Studies, which can be read on our website here.
The performance is available for free through January 31 on the group’s website; AtG Theaters accepts donations here.
Affiliate Event
Conférence: “Le système d’immigration canadien”
February 3 | 4:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Note: This event will be conducted in French.
L’immigration a joué un rôle très important dans l’histoire et le développement du Canada en tant que pays. Dans ce programme virtuel, l’Alliance française de Berkeley accueillera deux experts pour mener une discussion sur le système d’immigration du Canada. Ils présenteront comment le système canadien se compare à celui des États-Unis, les avantages et les possibilités associés à l’immigration, ainsi que les défis potentiels.
Les panelistes seront Irene Bloemraad, une sociologue politique et directrice du Programme d’études canadiennes à l’Université de Californie à Berkeley, et Yves Beaulieu, le consul pour la politique étrangère et la diplomatie au consulat général du Canada à San Francisco.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Happy Holidays from Canadian Studies! ☃️

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


🎄 Canadian Studies Announcements 🎄
In this issue:
  • A special holiday message from Program Director Irene Bloemraad
  • Board Member Brad Barber explains why he supports Canadian Studies
  • Newfoundland’s Mummers, a Canadian Christmas tradition
  • Holiday recipe: Bûche de Noël, Québec’s yule log cake
  • Spring event preview: Social Diversity & Political Identities, feat. Allison Harell
Season’s Greetings from Canadian Studies!
Dear Friends,
It’s hard for me to believe, but in less two weeks 2020 will be at an end. Reflecting on our program’s activities over this very strange year, I find myself instead looking ahead. I am pleased to say that in spite of this year’s difficulties I see a clear path forward for Canadian Studies in 2021 – one where the program is not only surviving, but thriving.
Of course, this year has brought some significant challenges for our program. Travel restrictions limited the ability of our research grant recipients to work, and we had to suspend our much-beloved in-person lunchtime colloquia. We were most disappointed to have to cancel our annual Canadian Thanksgiving, our chance to celebrate the holiday together.
However, these obstacles also revealed some exciting opportunities and untapped potential for the program going forward. Our move online has enabled us to reach a much larger audience – not just in the Bay Area, but in Canada and even farther afield. (One of our events was even covered by The McGill Tribune!) We’ve heard from many of you about the importance of the Canadian Studies community in this time of pandemic, and we hope to continue to foster those connections when we transition back to in-person events some time in the spring. While 2020 put some of our plans on hold, we’re more determined than ever to put the experience we’ve gained over the last eight months to good use, and hit the ground running with an even better program in 2021.
For that reason, we ask that you please consider making a gift of any size in support of Canadian Studies. The support of our donors – your support – is crucial to ensuring that we can continue providing quality education about Canada. While many programs at Berkeley face severe budget cuts, our donors enable us to arrange expert lectures on Canadian subjects and offer research support for graduate students. We know that there are many worthy causes in need of support this year; that’s why we’re so grateful to those of you who continue to demonstrate your belief in the importance of our work.
From all of us at Canadian Studies, we thank you so much for your support, and look forward to seeing you in the New Year!
In friendship,
Irene Bloemraad
Program Director ☃️
Board Member Brad Barber Reflects on 30 Years of Supporting Canadian Studies
Brad Barber is a long-time friend of Canadian Studies who played a crucial role in creating the program we know today. As Assistant VP of Institutional Advancement in the UC Office of the President, he helped establish both the Barnes Chair in Canadian Studies and the Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowship. Now, as a Canadian Studies board member, he’s constantly looking for opportunities to enhance and expand what he calls one of Berkeley’s best-run programs.
We sat down with Brad to hear his year-end reflections on the state of the program. Excerpts from the interview are below; read the full piece on our website.
How did you get involved with Canadian Studies?
My interest in Canada goes back to my childhood. As an undergraduate at Cal, I followed Canadian politics and affairs. I was very interested in bilingualism and the relationship between French and English-speaking Canadians. Unfortunately, they didn’t have any courses in Canadian history at Berkeley, but I got to know Tom Barnes, who later founded the Canadian Studies Program. Professor Barnes thought that Canada is actually a very important country for America in many ways, and one that’s surprisingly little-understood. When I moved to the Office of the President, I was excited to the do some serious fundraising for the program.
What are your goals as a board member?
This isn’t surprising given my background, but I think that the board’s primary duty should be to raise funds. It’s going to be a while before higher ed goes back to good times, and I think next year will be particularly hard. I also hope that Canadian Studies can do a better job of connecting with undergraduates, especially students who come from Canada. We should be engaging with these students from the moment they step foot on campus, even if they’re not studying anything directly related to Canada. I think that digital events offer a great opportunity to do more outreach in this area.
What do you think are the program’s strengths?
I’m involved with a number of other programs across campus, and I have to say that I’m very impressed with the way that Canadian Studies is run. I think it’s remarkable what you have been able to accomplish with the modest funding available. Canadian Studies does more with less than almost anyone I know, and that’s to Irene’s credit. I often tell other faculty directors that they should follow her example.
Newfoundland’s Mummers: A Christmas Tradition with a Checkered History
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many holiday traditions to adapt to life online. Among the latest is the 2020 Mummer’s Festival, a St John’s celebration aimed at preserving a centuries-old Christmas practice where revelers visit their neighbors door-to-door in disguise. Once widespread in England and its colonies, it’s now practiced mostly in Newfoundland and Labrador, where it’s recognized as part of the provinces’ intangible heritage.
Yet this tradition has a dark history: for over 100 years, associations with violence and hooliganism kept mummering underground in the province. The Newfoundland legislature actually declared the custom illegal in 1861, and the ban was not lifted until the 1990s. It’s only been since 2007 that a dedicated group of enthusiasts has begun to revive the practice for a new generation.
How did mummering go from a popular celebration to being viewed as an antiquated embarrassment, and finally to being celebrated as a unique cultural icon? Learn more about the fascinating history and present state of this quirky tradition on Atlas Obscura and CNN (with pictures).
Bûche de Noël, or Yule Log Cake
Holiday Recipe: The Bûche de Noël, Québec’s Yule Log Cake
For many Québécois, the holiday season wouldn’t be complete without enjoying a delicious bûche de Noël, or “Yule log”. Unlike its English counterpart, however, this edible log isn’t one you’ll want to burn. Formed from a chocolate Swiss roll filled with jam or cream, this cake is shaped into a log and often decorated with powdered sugar “snow”, berries, and marzipan or merengue mushrooms.
Learn how to make your own bûche de Noël from scratch at AllRecipes.com. Or, if you’re caught up in the holiday rush, try this simplified version using a few pre-made ingredients from Food Network Canada.
Spring Event Preview
Social Diversity, Partisan Identities and the 2019 Canadian Election, feat. Prof. Allison Harell
February 2 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Join Canadian Studies as we kicking off our Spring 2021 Colloquium with Professor Allison Harell of the Université du Québec à Montréal. In her talk, Harell will draw on the 2019 Canadian Election Study to explore the ways in which intergroup dynamics structure vote choice in Canada. She focuses in particular on how partisan identities and political preferences are anchored in key social cleavages in Canada that structured the way in which the 2019 election campaign played out.
Allison Harell holds the UQAM Research Chair in the Political Psychology of Social Solidarity. She is interested in how social diversity affects the political world, especially the ways in which prejudice influences public opinion formation. Her current research focuses on how intergroup relations influence support for both economic and political solidarity, as well as how intergroup perceptions spill over into electoral politics.
An RSVP is required to attend: please click here to register.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Video: Canada, disability rights & COVID; Are expats Canada’s most important export?

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Video: Disability rights in the workplace during COVID-19, feat. Laverne Jacobs
  • Call for papers: 63rd Annual Western Social Science Ass’n Conference
  • Call for papers: Canada in Conversation: Crisis, Challenge and Change
  • External event: “Planet Canada: How Our Expats are Shaping the Future”
Video: Disability Rights and Workplace Discrimination in the Time of COVID-19, feat. Laverne Jacobs
In September, University of Windsor Law professor and former Canadian Studies affiliate Laverne Jacobs spoke at a flash conference convened by the Disability Rights group of the Berkeley Center on Comparative Equality & Anti-Discrimination Law. The conference addressed global issues of workplace discrimination against people with disabilities during COVID-19.
Professor Jacobs, an authority on human rights and disability law in Canada and the United States, was a visiting Fulbright Research Chair in Canadian Studies at Berkeley in 2014. In the September panel, Professor Jacobs joined experts from four countries to discuss how the pandemic has confronted the disabled community with new and unique issues in the workplace. She presented on the current situation in Canada, addressing issues of accessibility, income security, and accommodation of vulnerable groups.
The entire panel is available to watch online via YouTube, or on the BCCE’s website (with a downloadable transcript). Professor Jacob’s talk begins at 36:07. Canadian Studies conducted an interview with Professor Jacobs in October, where she discussed her work in further detail.
Call for Papers: 63rd Annual Western Social Science Association Conference
Due date: January 29, 2021 | Submit proposals here
The Western Social Science Association (WSSA) is accepting papers on Canadian studies topics for its 63rd annual conference, scheduled virtually from April 12-25, 2021. Founded in 1958, WSSA draws on scholars in some 32 disciplines to foster professional study, advance research, promote the teaching of social science, and encourage professional exchange across the social science disciplines.
The Canadian Studies section accepts proposals relating to any disciplines or areas of Canadian Studies, not just the social sciences. The section covers all aspects of Canadian Studies and is happy to have panels on Canadian Literature, Arts, and Humanities as well as panels on Canadian Geography, History, Anthropology, Economics, Politics, Business, Environment, Public Policy, etc. Panels can be appropriately cross-listed with other WSSA Sections, such as Borderland Studies, Political Science, or Native Studies.
The conference will accept proposals for live Zoom sessions, recorded sessions, hybrid sessions, and document-only papers. Proposals must be submitted to the appropriate section through the organization’s website by January 29, 2021. Questions about the Canadian Studies section should be directed to Pierre Atlas at patlas@marian.edu. General information about the conference can be found here.
Call for Papers: Canada in Conversation: Crisis, Challenge and Change
Deadline: January 29, 2021 | Submit proposals here
The Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies at York University is pleased to invite graduate students from around the world to join their annual conference: Canada in Conversation: Crisis, Challenge and Change (scheduled virtually from April 9-30, 2021).
As the nation moves into the new decade, 2021 sees the country navigating a shifting landscape that is coming out of crisis, confronting new challenges and undergoing change. So, what are the conversations Canada and Canadians are having? How are these conversations changing (especially in a COVID and post-COVID era)? Where are they taking place? Who is changing them? What kinds of changes are occurring and/or what changes need to occur? Where is the conversation headed—and where should/could it be going?
Please submit proposals (max. 250 words) here by Friday, 29 January 2021.
UPCOMING EVENTS
External Event: “Planet Canada: How Our Expats are Shaping the Future”
December 9 | 9:00 a.m. | RSVP here
Join C100 for a special discussion with author John Stackhouse for a special discussion of his new book, Planet Canada: How Our Expats Are Shaping the Future.
Over three million Canadians live abroad, yet few know of their far-reaching impact: that Canadians have been at the forefront of almost every major global movement in modern history. In Planet Canada, Stackhouse presents fresh new data on our global Canadian community and asserts that this powerful diaspora could be the country’s greatest untapped resource.
Stackhouse a senior vice-president at the Royal Bank of Canada, leading research on economic, technological and social change. He is also a senior fellow at the C.D. Howe Institute and University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, and is a former editor-in-chief of the Globe and Mail.
RSVP to C100 here.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720