Tag Archives: Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies

Maple Leaf Route Webinar – The Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World War

Note these items from a partner of Dominion Command may be of interest to some of our members.


Episode 3
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MIKE BECHTHOLD


PER ARDUA AD ASTRA: THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR

29 June @ 7:30 pm ET

CLICK HERE to register

In a few short years, the Royal Canadian Air Force expanded from a small domestic force of 8 squadrons and 4,000 personnel to a globe-spanning air force with 80 operational squadrons and 250,000 personnel (including 17,000 women). The RCAF defended London, led the Normandy invasion, protected convoys in the North Atlantic, and took the fight to Hamburg and Berlin. RCAF pilots served in North Africa, Italy, Burma, and the Aleutians. And, the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan was one of Canada’s most important wartime activities. This talk will explore the RCAF’s many contributions to victory in the Second World War.
Upcoming Webinars
R. SCOTT SHEFFIELD

Fighting a White Man’s War: Canada’s First Nations Peoples and the Second World War

20 July @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

MARIE EVE VAILLANCOURT


Dieppe 80 Years After: The Juno Beach Centre’s Exhibition From Dieppe to Juno


10 August @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

STACEY BARKER


To Help Win the Fight: Canadian Servicewomen of the Second World War


31 August @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

Presented by:
Recent Events

JEFF NOAKES

Canada and the Second World War at Sea

ANNA PEARSON, STEPHEN CONNOR, ROBERT CATSBERG

Ne-kah-ne-tah: The Liberation of Welberg, Memory, Meaning and Experience

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Copyright © 2022 Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
LCSC
75 University Ave W
Waterloo, ON  N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada

New articles are available from Canadian Military History!

Note these articles from a partner of Dominion Command may be of interest to some of our members.


Brigade-level leadership in Belgium and Holland, and postwar attempts to build a national memorial to the Second World War.
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New articles are available from Canadian Military History!

Vol. 31, No. 1, Winter / Spring 2022

Doctrine, Training and Education in the Development of Canadian Brigadiers

Abstract: This paper argues that Anglo-Canadian doctrine had a greater influence on how Brigadiers Robert Moncel and James Jefferson commanded their brigades than the experience they gained along two different career paths. The rapid expansion of the Canadian Army during the Second World War prevented Canadian infantry and armoured brigade commanders from gaining experience in both staff and command billets. As junior or senior officers, future brigade commanders normally attended either a condensed version of Staff College or Senior Officers’ School. Here they developed two distinct skill sets before they assumed command of brigades. Despite the differing purposes of these course, the doctrine used provided an institutional language that transcended the experience gained by officers as they progressed in their careers. By examining the pre-war and wartime careers of Moncel and Jefferson and how they commanded their brigades in Operation Suitcase, it is clear doctrine had a greater influence on how they planned and fought their formations.

Failure to Launch

Abstract: Between the end of the Second World War and the mid-1960s, the Canadian federal government made several attempts to commemorate and memorialise those who died during the war. Despite strong government support and advocacy from the Royal Canadian Legion, the Canadian population did not believe that building a new memorial was a wise expenditure of taxpayer money. This article uses newspaper records, The Legionary and government documents to examine how successive federal governments tried and failed to commemorate and memorialise the Second World War with a national war memorial. This article also problematises the current understanding of how the Second World has been remembered in Canada. The current historiographical understanding of Canadian Second World War memory suggests that the country has done a poor job commemorating the dead of that war. However, the lack of traditional memorials and monuments does not necessarily indicate that the Second World War has gone unremembered, but that conceptualisations of memory need to be expanded to take stock of the commemorative landscape.

June 29th @7:30pm ET


PUBLIC LECTURE:Per Ardua Ad Astra
The Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World Warwith MIKE BECHTHOLDFor more information and to register CLICK HERE.

Canadian Military History is a partnership between the Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada and the Canadian War Museum – Musée canadien de la guerre.
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You are receiving this email because you signed up for updates from the Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada (formerly Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies), Wilfrid Laurier University.Our mailing address is:

Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada

75 University Ave W

Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5

Canada

Maple Leaf Route Webinar – The Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World War

These online events, the first of which is in about a week, from a partner of Dominion Command may be of interest to some of our members.


Episode 3
View this email in your browser
MIKE BECHTHOLD


PER ARDUA AD ASTRA: THE ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR

29 June @ 7:30 pm ET

CLICK HERE to register

In a few short years, the Royal Canadian Air Force expanded from a small domestic force of 8 squadrons and 4,000 personnel to a globe-spanning air force with 80 operational squadrons and 250,000 personnel (including 17,000 women). The RCAF defended London, led the Normandy invasion, protected convoys in the North Atlantic, and took the fight to Hamburg and Berlin. RCAF pilots served in North Africa, Italy, Burma, and the Aleutians. And, the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan was one of Canada’s most important wartime activities. This talk will explore the RCAF’s many contributions to victory in the Second World War.
Upcoming Webinars
R. SCOTT SHEFFIELD

Fighting a White Man’s War: Canada’s First Nations Peoples and the Second World War

20 July @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

MARIE EVE VAILLANCOURT


Dieppe 80 Years After: The Juno Beach Centre’s Exhibition From Dieppe to Juno


10 August @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

STACEY BARKER


To Help Win the Fight: Canadian Servicewomen of the Second World War


31 August @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

Presented by:
Recent Events

JEFF NOAKES

Canada and the Second World War at Sea

Twitter
Facebook
Website
Copyright © 2022 Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
LCSC
75 University Ave W
Waterloo, ON  N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada

Maple Leaf Route Webinar – NE-KAH-NE-TAH: The Liberation Of Welberg, Memory, Meaning and Experience

These online events, the first of which is tomorrow, from a partner of Dominion Command may be of interest to some of our members.


Aaaaaaand we’re back for season 2!
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The Maple Leaf Route Webinar Series is Back!

ANNA PEARSON, STEHPEN CONNOR, and ROBERT CATSBERG


NE-KAH-NE-TAH: THE LIBERATION OF WELBERG, MEMORY, MEANING AND EXPERIENCE

8 June @ 7:30 pm ET

CLICK HERE to register

Over five days in November 1944, the Algonquin Regiment played a pivotal role in the capture of the tiny Dutch town of Welberg. In 2018, twenty Canadian university students returned to the site as part of an experiential learning course focused on the Regiment’s warpath from Point 140 to the Kusten Canal. Throughout the program, students both ‘walked the ground’ and engaged with contemporary communities in order to better understand past evens and consider the construction of historical meaning and memory.

This talk brings together three of the course’s facilitators: Anna Pearson (York University), Stephen Connor (Nipissing University) and Robert Catsburg (Welberg Liberation Memorial Foundation) to explore ways in which this hybrid of traditional and experiential learning introduced university students to a shared historical and cultural heritage.

Upcoming Webinars
MIKE BECHTHOLD


Per Ardua Ad Astra: The Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World War


29 June @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

R. SCOTT SHEFFIELD

Fighting a White Man’s War: Canada’s First Nations Peoples and the Second World War

20 July @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

MARIE EVE VAILLANCOURT


Dieppe 80 Years After: The Juno Beach Centre’s Exhibition From Dieppe to Juno


10 August @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

STACEY BARKER


Women and the Second World War


31 August @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

Presented by:
Recent Events

MAYA GOLDENBERG

Is There a War on Science?

Twitter
Facebook
Website
Copyright © 2022 Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
LCSC
75 University Ave W
Waterloo, ON  N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada

Maple Leaf Route Webinar – NE-KAH-NE-TAH: The Liberation Of Welberg, Memory, Meaning and Experience

This online events from a partner of Dominion Command may be of interest to some of our members.


Episode 2
View this email in your browser
ANNA PEARSON, STEPHEN CONNOR, and ROBERT CATSBERG


NE-KAH-NE-TAH: THE LIBERATION OF WELBERG, MEMORY, MEANING AND EXPERIENCE

8 June @ 7:30 pm ET

CLICK HERE to register

Over five days in November 1944, the Algonquin Regiment played a pivotal role in the capture of the tiny Dutch town of Welberg. In 2018, twenty Canadian university students returned to the site as part of an experiential learning course focused on the Regiment’s warpath from Point 140 to the Kusten Canal. Throughout the program, students both ‘walked the ground’ and engaged with contemporary communities in order to better understand past evens and consider the construction of historical meaning and memory.

This talk brings together three of the course’s facilitators: Anna Pearson (York University), Stephen Connor (Nipissing University) and Robert Catsburg (Welberg Liberation Memorial Foundation) to explore ways in which this hybrid of traditional and experiential learning introduced university students to a shared historical and cultural heritage.

Upcoming Webinars

MIKE BECHTHOLD


Per Ardua Ad Astra: The Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World War


29 June @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

R. SCOTT SHEFFIELD

Fighting a White Man’s War: Canada’s First Nations Peoples and the Second World War

20 July @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

MARIE EVE VAILLANCOURT


Dieppe 80 Years After: The Juno Beach Centre’s Exhibition From Dieppe to Juno


10 August @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

STACEY BARKER


Women and the Second World War


31 August @ 7:30 pm EDT

CLICK HERE to register

Presented by:
Recent Events

MAYA GOLDENBERG

Is There a War on Science?

Twitter
Facebook
Website
Copyright © 2022 Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
LCSC
75 University Ave W
Waterloo, ON  N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for the Study of Canada · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada