Tag Archives: World War One Centennial Commission

WWI DISPATCH September 2022

An item from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission, which may be of interest to members.


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September 2022

Bells of Peace 2022

Bells of Peace is a U.S. national “bell tolling” remembrance created in collaboration with the Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (SHGTUS) to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of the World War I Armistice, November 11, 2018. The Doughboy Foundation has since promoted it as an annual remembrance of those who served in WWI and of the moment when the guns fell silent, and bells tolled on the Western Front… on the 11th day of the 11th month, at the 11th hour in 1918, after four years of brutal combat. Pease click anywhere on the image above to find out more about how to participate in Bells of Peace in 2022.

Jerry Looper Hester, 1931–2022

Jerry Looper Hester

Jerry Hester, one of the original twelve Commissioners at the establishment of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission in 2013, has died at age 90 in North Carolina. Jerry’s indomitable determination was utterly essential to the establishment of the Commission, the broad national commemoration of the Centennial of  World War I, and the construction of the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. Jerry’s obituary is available here. An In Memoriam essay honoring “One of the most inexhaustible and effective soldiers in the effort to honor the Americans who served and sacrificed their nation in the First World War” is available here. The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission and the Doughboy Foundation mourn Jerry’s passing.


Verizon goes back to school with new immersive learning content, including the WWI Memorial “Virtual Explorer

verizon-innovative-learning

As students head back to school, Verizon is continuing to bolster immersive learning content across its award-winning Verizon Innovative Learning education initiative. Verizon’s impactful partnerships with trusted education companies, edtech innovators ,and cultural institutions enable educators to access new tech-driven lesson plans that utilize the power of augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) apps in the classroom, such as the Doughboy Foundation’s WWI Memorial “Virtual Explorer.” The Memorial app introduces a next generation of young adults to the transformational impact WWI had on America. Click here to read more about this exciting new immersive learning content initiative.


Four more “Rush Hour” concerts by the U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own” will round out September at The National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC

Concert at the WWI Memorial

The U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own” will make September finish on a high note with four more Thursday Evening Rush Hour Concerts at the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC weekly this month. The concerts are part of the band’s 100th anniversary year. Here are the remaining dates and times (weather permitting) for the 2022 concert series:

The Band starts to set up at the Memorial after the completion of Daily Taps at 5:00 pm, and the concerts begin promptly at 6:00 pm (6:30 pm on September 15). There is plenty of seating at the Memorial with good views of the band. Check the Band’s web site or social media to determine the status of the event in case of inclement weather on a concert day, or any changes in starting times.


Protecting our future by remembering our past

Monahan speaks at American Legion convention 08302022

Commissioner of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, John D. Monahan, delivered remarks at The American Legion’s 103rd National Convention. A 20-year veteran of the U.S. Army and member of American Legion Post 18 in Essex, Conn., Monahan spoke of the heroism and legacy of those who fought in the war. “It was the war that changed the world,” he said. “They had been imbued with a fervor for service toward achieving a public good. They sought to channel this energy, enthusiasm and public spirit in ways that would strengthen the nation both physically and morally.” Click here to read the entire article, and watch a video of Monahan’s speech, and learn how that “public spirit” from World War I led to the establishment of The American Legion and a lasting legacy of service.


First U.S. Navy ship sunk by enemy in WWI is found, ending 105-year mystery

USS Jacob Jones ship's bell

The first U.S. Navy ship sunk by the enemy in World War I has finally been found, ending 105-year mystery. A team of experienced deep divers were able to locate the missing USS Jacob Jones on August 11, about 40 miles off the coast of the Isles of Scilly in the United Kingdom. The “Tucker-class” destroyer was the first American destroyer ever to be sunk by enemy action, torpedoed in 1917 by a German submarine. Click here to read more, and learn about the century-long search for the Jacob Jones and the remarkable stories that came with her sinking.


Help restore the trees at the 316th Monument above Sivry-sur-Meuse

dead spruce trees at 316th monument above Sivry-sur-Meuse

The beautiful spruce trees that lined the road leading to the 316th Infantry Regiment monument above Sivry-sur-Meuse in France are now dead or dying from the region-wide infestation of the spruce bark beetle ravaging the Argonne region. This is one of the most iconic monuments in the area, and the hilltop offers one of the best views of the battlefield that exists. Some 50 trees need to be removed, and (hopefully) replaced. The trust fund set up by the 316th veterans that pays for the monument’s maintenance has insufficient funds to remove all the dead and dying trees. A GoFundMe campaign has been set up to supplement the trust fund, so the the work on the trees can take place. Click here to read more, and learn how you can help support this recovery effort at a unique WWI monument.


Iconic Battleship Texas, last ship to survive both world wars, headed for $35 million makeover and new home port

USS Texas

Battleship Texas has a storied history as the last surviving battleship to serve in both World Wars, a source of pride for those who love it most. “Battleship Texas is one of the most iconic things in Texas, the U.S., the world,” says Bruce Bramlett with the Battleship Texas Foundation. “Talking about the only surviving ship that served in WWI and WWII.” Now after calling the San Jacinto Battleground in La Porte, TX home for more than seven decades, the iconic battleship is about to ship out for a $35 million makeover before it is moved to its new home. Click here to read more and watch video about the storied past of the USS Texas, and the plans for her display after completion of the restoration project.


Mighty Yet Stubby: A Four-Legged WWI Hero Takes D.C. By Storm

Sergeant Stubby

Sergeant Stubby, the diminutive bull terrier who made a name for himself on the WWI battlefields of France as a mascot, caretaker, and protector of American Doughboys, was already famous when he met President Woodrow Wilson just a few weeks after the end of the war. The two were reported to have shaken paws. But as it turned out, they would soon be neighbors in Washington, D.C. Click here to read the whole story, and learn how Sergeant Stubby became a regular in D.C.’s social scene, and a fixture in the District, especially at events that pertained to the Great War. 


Legion established burial site for WWI vets at Bloomington’s Park Hill Cemetery

Soldiers’ monument at Park Hill Cemetery in Bloomington, IL

After the end of World War I, the Louis E. Davis Post 56 of the American Legion in Bloomington, IL “out of a need and desire for a specific burial plot for veterans of the Great War (today known as World War I)” decided to create a designated section of the Park Hill Cemetery and Mausoleum for the burial of members of their organization who had served. It seemed like a good idea in 1919, but little did they know the challenges they would face before the dedication almost a decade later. Click here to read the entire story, and learn how, despite the obstacles, the facility now stands as “a proof that we do not forget, that we have not forgotten the boys who gave their lives to bring peace to this world.


World War I War Memorial, Library host ribbon cutting for anniversary

Lewis County War Memorial and Louis Bennett Jr. Public Library ribbon cutting 2022

Supporters, friends, staff, veterans and dignitaries attended a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Lewis County War Memorial and Louis Bennett Jr. Public Library on Friday, August 26. The occasion marked the 100th anniversary of the memorial and library. Following the death her son, Louis Bennett Jr., in WWI, Sallie Maxwell Bennett bestowed her family home and private library to Lewis County to live on in perpetuity as a war memorial and public library. Click here to read the whole story, and find out how Weston America Legion Post 4 helped create the “amazing resource” that is now home to the library, war memorial and American Legion Post 4 offices.


US Soldiers share in remembrance of epic WWI battle to save Vicenza, Venice

Vincenza, Venice battle memorial 2022

Soldiers assigned to U.S. Army Southern European Task Force, Africa joined members of the Italian Army, Aug. 28, near Gallio, Italy, to honor those who were killed in action during World War I while defending Vicenza and Venice, Italy.The Bersaglieri Brigade of the Italian Army celebrated its annual pilgrimage to Cima Valbella near Gallio, to honor the sacrifice of the Bersaglieri soldiers of the 5th and 14th Regiment in the ‘Great War.’ Click here to read more, and learn how, to remember the battle, the Italian and U.S. soldiers hiked 40 minutes to the top of Mount Valbella for memorial services..


National WWI Memorial honors Reams American Legion Post for 6 days

Manuel E. Reams Jr.

Manuel E. Reams Jr. was a cattleman and former baseball player when he was drafted into the U.S. Army during World War I. He was killed Oct. 31, 1918, the first day of the Ypres-Lys Offensive. He was 27.Fifteen months later, on the evening of Jan. 7, 1920, in the Odd Fellows Hall in Suisun City, 37 men who had served in the Army, Navy and Marine Corps during the Great War voted to create California American Legion Post 182 and named it after Reams. That post, from Sept. 5-10, will be honored at 5 p.m. each evening with the playing of Daily Taps at the World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. Click here to learn more about Manuel E. Reams Jr., and the Daily Taps program.


American museum returns to Greece exhibit stolen by the WWI Bulgarian army

manuscript gospel over 1,000 years old

The Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C. has returned a manuscript gospel that is more than 1,000 years old to the Greek Orthodox Church after finding that it was looted from a Greek monastery during the First World War. The museum said it returned the artifact, which its founders acquired at a Christie’s auction in 2011, to a representative of the Eastern Orthodox Church in a private ceremony in New York. Click here to read more about the late 10th or early 11th century manuscript, and learn how several other American institutions have turned up with artifacts looted from the same monastery in WWI.


Missouri Marine among those who earned coveted title ‘Devil Dog’ in WWI battle

Willard Paul Gress

Roger Hager has long been a person of reflection, piecing together cross-sections of family and local history in an effort to acquire a better understanding of how military service shaped the lives of his ancestors. Most recently, he has collected information regarding the World War I service of his late great uncle, who was among the brave Marines who earned the admired title of “Devil Dogs” in the historic Battle of Belleau Wood. Click here to learn more about Willard Paul Gress, and how this Marine fought in many historic battles of World War I, concluding with the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 


The Battle of Cantigny Forever Changed the US Military

Battle of Cantigny scene

Writing on the the War History Online web site. author Samantha Franco asserts that “The Battle of Cantigny was the first great American victory of the First World War. With a military that was under-trained and ill-prepared, a win on the global stage was necessary to prove the might of the United States. Cantigny was the first time during the conflict where the US military was forced to prove itself – and it didn’t disappoint.” Click here to read the entire essay, and learn how “the Germans were prepared for the US military to either spend a long time training troops or be ill-prepared and easily defeated. What they realized after the Battle of Cantigny was that this wasn’t the case.”


The Espionage Act’s sordid WWI origins

espionage act cartoon

The FBI investigation into possible Espionage Act violations by former President Donald Trump has sparked curiosity about the World War I-era law. The Espionage Act was passed by Congress and signed by President Woodrow Wilson in a climate of xenophobia and anti-Red hysteria in 1917, the year the U.S. entered WWI. But because many Americans opposed fighting in what they viewed as a war between European colonial powers, Congress included provisions allowing the federal government to crack down on dissent. Click here to read more, and learn how the Espionage Act, despite its name, has rarely been used to punish actual espionage.


Choctaw heroes of World War I

Choctaw heroes of World War I newspaper

Author Rufus Ward writes about how, in the recognition of the Navajo Code Talkers in World War II, frequently overlooked “were the code talkers of many other Indian nations including the first code talkers, the Choctaw” in World War I. To support his point, Ward dives into a 1919 Stars and Stripes newspaper article that “told the story of the first code talkers, who were 19 Choctaw Indians.” Click here to read Ward’s entire article, and learn how “While the Choctaws were noted for the Choctaw Code, there were more than 9,000 Native Americans from 60 different tribes serving with American forces in Europe. They were among the American troops most feared by the Germans.


World War I era practice bombs found on Waco, TX construction site

WWI practice bomb Waco, TX 2022

A construction crew in Waco, TX recovered two bombs from a Little League baseball fields construction site; the McLennan County Sheriff’s Bomb Squad determined the devices were not live but likely practice bombs from former military installations on the same site. “This is the original site of the Rich Field Army Air Base built in 1917 after the United States got involved in WWI,” Sheriff Parnell McNamara explained. Click here to read more, and learn how the discovery of the inert WWI ordnance “hits pretty close to home” for the county sheriff.


The Perils of Pandemic and War: Spanish Flu Brings D.C. to its Knees

Red Cross Worker DC

In March of 1918, word began traveling of a flu-like illness slowly spreading throughout the country from its place of origin, Camp Funston, Kansas. The sickness swept through the ranks of the American military, knocking many-a-men down for a few days, but killing very few. This influenza epidemic caused few in DC much concern during that spring.”  But that would change quickly. Click here to read Meaghan Kacmarcik’s absorbing look at how in 1918 “there seemed to be relatively little attention paid to how to protect the District from the seemingly inevitable spread of the malady to DC. And spread it did.”


Women in a World Designed for Men:
a World War I librarian and a Naval Academy plebe confront injustice

The War Librarian cover

Peggy Burch on the Chapter 16 web site reviews the new book “The War Librarian” by Addison Armstrong, and finds lots of resonances between the challenge faced by her female World War I protagonist. “The War Librarian switches between two narrators, seemingly unrelated women living in separate times and places whose tales gradually converge.” Click here to read more, and learn why the novel about a WWI librarian and a U.S. Naval Academy plebe is “a page-turner” that “confronts urgent contemporary cultural conflicts — misogyny, racism, and book banning — by taking a detailed dive into two moments in history.


Tallahassee doctor publishes book of his father’s World War I photos

Brancardier, Section 646 cover

Over 200 remarkable pictures taken by a young American soldier during World War I are featured in a new book published by Tallahassee surgeon Dr. Charles E. Moore. Moore’s father, the late Paul Handy Moore, a native of Charleston, Missouri, and later a resident of Tallahassee, volunteered in 1917 for service with the French army and documented his experiences as an ambulance driver on the battlefields of France in a photo album created more than a century ago. Click here to find put more about the book, and learn how the the volume “provides an unusually complete picture of what a young American soldier saw and experienced as he picked up wounded soldiers from the trenches and brought them to temporary hospitals behind the lines while dodging shells and shrapnel.


“World War I History Is Wrong, and Skewing Our View of China”

Hal Brands

Analyst Hal Brands asserts that “when analysts warn of an unwanted war with China, or bemoan America’s alleged lack of magnanimity following its victory in the Cold War, they are invoking perceived lessons of World War I. Alas, some of the most commonly held ideas about the war are wrong — and they deeply skew our understanding of the modern world.” Click here to read Brands’ entire contrarian take on much of the perceived lessons of WWI, supporting his contention that “For the U.S. to thrive in the great rivalries shaping this century, it must better understand the conflict that ushered in the last.”


Birthday of General John Pershing

General John Pershing

General of the Armies
John Joseph Pershing
Born September 13, 1860


Doughboy MIA for September 2022

Edward Michael McAvoy

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Our Doughboy MIA this month this time around is a man we just searched for in August: PVT Edward Michael McAvoy ASN3193251 M CO/314th INF/79 DIV – KIA September 26th, 1918.

Edward Michael McAvoy was born in Benedicta, Maine on 28MAR1887, to Mary T McAvoy. Little is known of his father other than his death in occurring in 1908. Mary McAvoy had two sons, the other being Frederick McAvoy. On draft registration day  Edward listed his home address as Webster, Massachusetts and his occupation as shoemaker. He is described as tall and slender with brown hair and brown eyes. He claimed no exemption from service.

He was inducted into service at Southbridge, Massachusetts on 26MAY1918 and sent to Camp Upton in New York for induction and assigned to the 8th CO/152nd Depot Brigade. From there he was transferred to the 79th Division at Camp Meade, Maryland on 22JUN1918 and assigned to M CO/314th/79 DIV on 27JUN1918. He sailed with his new unit to France from Hoboken, New Jersey aboard the USS Leviathan on July 8th, 1918.

Upon arrival in France on the afternoon of July 15th 1918, the 314th Infantry was sent towards the 10th Training area where it trained under French officers until September 7th, when they took up positions in the Avocourt-Malancourt sector to partially relieve the French in defensive positions near Hill 304 in preparation for the Meuse-Argonne offensive. M CO/314th Infantry spent most of this time in reserve, creating defensive positions and assisting in repairing roads. On the Morning of September 26th 1918, the 79th  Division went into attack against Butte d’Montfaucon. Montfuacon sat on top of a large hill, making it a key part of the German defensive line, where German artillery observers used it to great advantage, directing artillery on American positions. In order for the American offensive to be successful, the 79th DIV had to capture Montfaucon as soon as possible. The position was fortified with a series of consecutive trench systems, bunkers, and machine gun nests. The 79th were under orders to capture the butte by the end of the day. At 5:30am on the morning of September 26th 1918, Co M/314th infantry moved forward toward Malancourt, supported by the 315th Infantry. Under a heavy smoke screen, they appeared in front of the first line of German defenses and took the German machine gun nests head on. By the afternoon the Company found itself again taking on heavy machine gun fire while taking the second line of German trenches. That was as far as they were able to get; the company reorganized and stayed overnight in the second line of trenches. The Germans were only a few hundred yards away and harassed Co M/314th with machine gun and sniper fire the entire night. It was there, around 9:00 pm, that PVT McAvoy was struck by a bullet in the stomach and died almost instantly. He was buried by the regimental chaplain.

Following the war, his family was first informed that PVT McAvoy had been recovered and buried in the nearby newly established Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, however this was found to be in error and in 1921 an investigation was initiated. It was found that PVT McAvoy had not been recovered and despite further searching by GRS field personnel his remains went unlocated.

Doughboy MIA was asked by Nancy Schaff and leaders of the 314th Infantry Historical Association to look into the case, which we did. Robert Laplander did the initial work on the case in 2017, which was found to have good merit, and it was then handed to Alexander Curran for further examination. In late 2021, the case was presented to the team by Alexander with the recommendation for possible recon on site in the 2022 season, and this past August the team did indeed spend a day on the site that the research pinpointed. Our findings are encouraging and will be discussed in an upcoming Zoom call tentatively scheduled for the last week of September. Stay tuned for more details on that, and we look forward to YOU attending the call and seeing just what your contributions are accomplishing to get our lost Doughboys found.

Want to donate and be part of the action? Hop on over to www.ww1cc.org/mia or www.doughboymia.org and make a tax-free donation to our non-profit and help us find these boys, and we’ll see YOU soon on the Zoom!

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Merchandise from the Official
Doughboy Foundation WWI Store

WWI Poppy Lapel Pin

Poppy Lapel Pin

Back in stock!!

  • Exclusive Commemorative WW1 Poppy Lapel Pin
  • Soft enamel color design
  • Approx. 1.5 inch in dia.
  • Standard military clasp

Proceeds from the sale of these pins will help complete the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the Doughboy Foundation.



Bells of Peace Participation App

Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

QR Code for Virtual Explorer App download


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Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


Donation for Daily Taps


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Doughboy MIA


Pershing Sponsors

Pershing Sponsors


Legacy Society



George Anthony Basel

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

George Anthony Basel

Submitted by: Brian Basel {Grandson}

George Anthony Basel was born around 1890. George Basel served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Served in the U.S. Navy for four years as a Machinist Mate First Class on four ships prior to World War One.

Enlisted in the Army on April 4, 1918 and was stationed at Camp Upton, Yaphank, NY, with the 28th “Keystone” Infantry Division. He served overseas in France from May 4, 1918 with Company H, 2nd Battalion, 111th Infantry Regiment and then with Company B, 3rd Battalion.

His battle campaigns include Champagne-Marne, St. Muhiel, and Meuse-Argonne at Toul Sector. He was wounded in the right hand and shoulder on July 17, 1918 clearing the woods (Bois D’Aigremont) over the Paris Metz Road between Crezancy and Fossoy and was taken to Base 45 at Blois, France for recovery. He rejoined Company H on October 10, 1918 as it passed through Mountblainville, France.

Being fluent in German, when his unit returned home April 18, 1919, he remained overseas serving as an interpreter.

Read George Anthony Basel’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Honor the Stories of Service of ALL Who Served.

Do Your Bit to Help Build the new National World War I Memorial.

Fundraising thermometer 09062022


Will you toll the Bells of Peace in 2022 ?

An item from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission, which may be of interest to members.


View as a webpage

Doughboy Foundation and Bells of Peace combined logos

Announcing Bells of Peace 2022


Bells of Peace 2022 header image

You have tolled the bells in the past.
Please join us again in 2022
to honor all those who served and sacrificed

Bells of Peace is a U.S. national “bell tolling” remembrance created in collaboration with the Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (SHGTUS) in 2018 to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of the World War I Armistice.

The Doughboy Foundation has since promoted it as an annual remembrance of those who served in WWI and the11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, when the guns fell silent, and bells tolled on the Western Front in 1918.

Uncle Sam wants you to toll the bells

Sign Up

Register your 2022 participation as an individual or as an organization and join the tens of thousands who have tolled the bells in the name of liberty and freedom.

When you sign up you can add your organization’s logo to the National Participants Wall (going back to 2018).

Bells of Peace Participation App

No bell? No Problem!

Download the Bells of Peace Participation App and get a countdown timer to 11/11 @11am local.

Select from various bell sounds that toll 21 times, 5 seconds apart from your smartphone at the right time. Get others in your group to do the same, all selecting different sounds with the phone clocks synchronizing the tolling.

If you don’t use social media, you can still share your plans and your event through the App using the phone to take pictures or make videos, and it will also be included on the National Participants Wall.

Join us at the WWI Memorial in Washington D.C. in person
or online at 10:30am Eastern

Bells of Peace tolling at the WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The Doughboy Foundation will be hosting a Bells of Peace commemoration at the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C. starting at 10:30am Eastern on November 11, 2022.

General Barry McCaffrey

The ceremony will include a wreath dedication, remarks by special guest General Barry McCaffrey, the Bells of Peace tolling, and “Echoing Taps” by Taps For Veterans, when multiple buglers will play taps from different corners of the WWI Memorial.

If you are in DC, we invite you to join us live at the Memorial, located at Pennsylvania Avenue between 14th Street and 15th Street NW, across from the White House Visitor Center. If you are not local, tune in to our LIVE STREAM on the Doughboy Foundation YouTube channel at YouTube.Com/c/TheDoughboyFoundation or on the home page of Bells of Peace site.

Questions?

Get the overview on the About page or dig into the details on the Info and FAQs page.

Contact:
BellsOfPeace@doughboy.org

WWI DISPATCH August 2022

A monthly newsletter from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission, which may be of interest to members.


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August 2022

John Schmitt both uniforms

John Schmitt in his World War I uniform is the “face” of the Doughboy Foundation’s Daily Taps, with his photo frequently use in promotional roles. When he is not playing Taps at the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC, John is a trumpet player and assistant live sound engineer for the Air National Guard Band of the Northeast.

Daily Taps at the National World War I Memorial

John Schmitt: “Sounding Taps is Meaningful to Me First and Foremost Because it is Important to Veterans and their Families”

John Schmitt

This month, National WWI Memorial Daily Taps bugler John Schmitt shares the story of his life-long commitment to honor Veterans and their families by sounding Taps. He is also known by his peers as one of the greatest trumpet players of his generation.

Says John, “I’m from Northeast Ohio originally. I moved to Baltimore to live with my wife about twenty years ago. I don’t recall the first time I sounded Taps, but I think it was in high school at a Memorial Day event. A few years later I sounded Taps at my grandpa’s funeral.”

Click here to read more, and find out why John thinks that “Sounding Taps is a unique experience.”


US Army Band concerts 2022

U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own” will finish summer strong with Aug. & Sept. Rush Hour Concerts at The National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC

The U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own will end the summer with a flourish with Thursday Evening Rush Hour Concerts at the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC weekly in August and September starting Aug. 11. The concerts are part of the band’s 100th anniversary year. Here are the remaining dates dates and times (weather permitting) for the 2022 summer series:

  • Thursday, August 11, 6:30 pm, Army Band Trombone Ensemble
  • ThursdayAugust 18, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • Thursday, August 25, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • Thursday, September 1, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • Thursday, September 8, 6:30 pm, Concert Band
  • Thursday, September 15, 6:30 pm, Concert Band
  • Thursday, September 22, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • Thursday, September 29, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble

The Band starts to set up at the Memorial after the completion of Daily Taps at 5:00 pm, and the concerts start promptly at 6:30 pm. There is plenty of seating at the Memorial with good views of the band. In case of inclement weather on a concert day, check the Band’s web site or social media to determine the status of the event.


World War I Mobile Museum back on road with new name, same education mission

WWI Mobile Museum Congressional Record

After weathering many cancellations and shutdowns due to the disruptions caused by the Covid pandemic, the WWI Mobile Museum is back in action and on the road again, bringing artifacts that tell the story of America and World War I to senior centers, schools, and other facilities nationwide. And as a nice way to get things rolling again, the Museum received a very special recognition, via a Proclamation from Congress. Click here to read more, and find out how the museum is expanding its vision, and taking aim at bringing WWI history to Americans everywhere.


A World War I veteran was buried without military honors in 1987, but 35 years later she received recognition for her service

Marie Garrow Moss

A Newport News woman served during World War I, but no one played “Taps” or folded and presented the American flag at her funeral. She was buried without military honors — a wrong that a group of people wanted to make right. Marie Garrow Moss was the only Virginian who joined the “Hello Girls,” women recruited to the U.S. Army Signal Corps to operate the military’s telephone switchboards during WWI. Click here to read more, and learn how several Virginia organizations worked together to give Marie the honors that she didn’t receive at her funeral in 1987.


Wildfires are setting off hundreds of unexploded bombs on World War I battlefields, endangering firefighters

Fires on WWI battlefields

The summer’s unusually hot temperatures have led to several wildfires across Europe and they are setting off unexploded World War 1 bombs in the process. A wildfire in the southwest Kras region of Slovenia, the biggest since the country’s independence in 1991, has destroyed more than 8,000 acres of farmland. It’s also led to the explosion of countless WWI-era bombs, which had laid dormant for more than 100 years. Click here to read more, and learn how the legacy of World War I has become all too current a field of study for some parts of Europe.


Sacrifices of the U.S. 42nd (Rainbow) Division in World War I honored at commemoration of the 104th anniversary of the Battle of the Ourcq River

Rainbow Division Croix Rouge Farm

On July 23, 2022, the cities of Fère-en-Tardenois and Seringes-et Nesles honored the sacrifices of the U.S. 42nd (Rainbow) Division in WWI and commemorated the 104th anniversary of the battle of the Ourcq River (July 25 – August 3, 1918). On the battle site of Croix Rouge Farm stands a powerful memorial to the Rainbow Division by the British sculptor, James Butler (1931-2022), a member of the Royal Academy who passed away this year. Each year, a ceremony takes place there to commemorate the anniversary of the battle. Click here to read all about the ceremony at Croix Rouge Farm event, and how the event honoring those who died was all the more poignant this year.


Navy Veteran Lenah Higbee was first living woman to receive the Navy Cross

Lenah S. Higbee

Originally from Chatham in New Brunswick, Canada, Lenah S. Higbee came to the U.S. to study nursing. She completed training at the New York Postgraduate Hospital in 1889 and began working as a surgical nurse for a private practice. During this time, she met Marine Corps Lt. Col. John Henley Higbee. They married in 1899. After her husband’s death in the spring of 1908, Higbee decided to volunteer for the newly formed Navy Nurse Corps program and traveled to a naval hospital in Washington, D.C. to take exams. Click here to read more about how Higbee became part of the “Sacred Twenty,” the first group of female nurses to serve in the Navy, and played an important role in expanding opportunities for woman in Naval service.


104 years after his death, Bloomer, MN WWI soldier honored with Purple Heart

Bloomer soldier Taps

A group of veterans, politicians, locals and descendants of Martin A. Treptow gathered at the American Legion in Bloomer, MN last month to honor a serviceman who never made it home from World War I. During the ceremony, attendees gave the pledge of allegiance, listened to the story of Treptow, and saw the man honored with a 21-gun salute and the taps bugle call. The gathering was a long time coming. Click here to learn how Treptow’s family spent the last three years trying to secure their great-uncle a Purple Heart for his sacrifice.


A Broken Wreath: What two giants of History say to each other in silence

Woodrow Wilson

The chance discovery in 2021 of a damaged piece of history — a gift from President Woodrow Wilson to Marquis de Lafayette — started a year-long effort to restore the piece of history to its proper place. Yorick de Guichen of the Society of the Cincinnati tells the enthralling story of how a gift from the American president to “a fellow Servant of Liberty” took place in 1919, and how she and others took on the mission of restoring it to its proper condition at Lafayette’s tomb where Wilson had placed it 104 years ago.


Meet the World War I American soldier who invented the hard hat, a proud symbol of our nation’s working class

Edward W. Bullard

Some 33 million Americans, about 10 percent of the national population, work hard-hat jobs, requiring them to wear the iconic protective helmet that “is the team headgear of working-class America — the people who built the United States with their bare hands.” But not many Americans who wear the hard hat as part of their jobs know that they came out of one American’s experience in World War I. Click here to meet Edward W. Bullard, a U.S. Army veteran who crafted the world’s most important piece of industrial protective equipment after returning home from Europe and the carnage of World War I.


Queen Anne County soldier recalled as WWI hero who sacrificed for his country

Davis tombstone

Founded in the 1940s, American Legion Post 18 was named for a local Queen Anne’s County hero, county born and raised Jefferson Davis of Church Hill, who was the first county resident to sacrifice his life while fighting for freedom during World War I. Davis died July 24, 1918, during the Second Battle of the Marne (France), July 15 — August 6.  Click here to read more, and learn how, 104 years after Davis’ death, Post 18’s members must engage in ongoing efforts to combat incorrect assumptions linking the World War I hero with another historical figure bearing the same name.


Harlem Armory time messenger reveals snapshot of 1923

Harlem time capsule

The replacement of a 99-year-old granite cornerstone plaque of the New York National Guard’s historic Harlem Armory drill floor exposed a mystery when contractors found a sealed copper box inside the stone on Feb. 19, 2022. The copper time capsule, which was not known to be in the corner stone, contained documents pertaining to the 369th “Harlem Hell Fighters” of World War I fame, as well as documents of importance to the Black community in 1923 New York City. Click here to read the whole story, and learn how the chance discovery “highlighted the pride of Black New Yorkers in their regiment, their culture, and city officials’ recognition of the 369th and the black community” after World War I.


World War I hero to be inducted into Missouri National Guard Hall of Fame

James E. Rieger

On Sept. 9, 2022, Col. James E. Rieger will be inducted into the Missouri National Guard Hall of Fame at Kirksville. The building where the induction ceremony will take place is the Missouri National Guard Armory named after him in tribute to his service in France during WWI, and in helping building the modern state National Guard before and after World War I. Click here to learn more about Reiger, and how he was “lauded in France and the United States as the ‘Hero of the Argonne’ for the series of heroic feats he accomplished during the first three days of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.


What German soldiers thought about Americans in the aftermath of World War I

German POW

After World War I ended, American military intelligence officers reviewed troves of documents that detailed interrogations and intercepted diplomatic cables. They also compiled the opinions of German soldiers and citizens upon meeting Americans for the first time. It was released in a 1919 report called “Candid Comment on The American Soldier of 1917-1918 and Kindred Topics by The Germans.” The We Are The Mighty web site takes a look at the top 10 comments about the American soldier from the point of view of their German enemy.


How the ‘First Real New York Gangster’ Turned Guardsman Helped End WWI

Monk Eastman 2

As Monk Eastman lay in a field hospital, he learned his infantry division was preparing to breach the Hindenburg Line — the Germans’ last line of defense on the Western Front during World War I. Despite being sidelined with leg injuries and the victim of a gas attack, Eastman didn’t come this far to be a bystander. Half-naked and with bare feet, Eastman fled the hospital under the cover of night to join his company. He helped the Allies penetrate the Hindenburg Line on Sept. 29, 1918, six weeks before an armistice agreement was signed. Click here to read more, and learn why it wasn’t surprising that Eastman did not follow doctor’s orders. Following rules was not in his DNA, for Eastman had been a gangster before he enlisted in the New York National Guard in 1917.


George Dilboy, The First Greek-American Who Fell in World War I

George Dilboy, The First Greek-American Who Fell in World War I

It was on July 18, 1918, that George Dilboy was killed on a battlefield near Belleau, France in WWI after fighting so courageously that he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, America’s highest medal for bravery. The Greek-American’s conspicuous heroism was so outstanding that he was recognized and honored by three US presidents. Woodrow Wilson signed the authorization awarding Dilboy the Medal of Honor while Warren G. Harding brought his remains back to be buried with honors at Arlington National Cemetery, and Calvin Coolidge presided at his final burial there. Click here to read more about George Dilboy and how events during and after WWI affected his legacy.


One of Iowa’s Oldest Shopping Malls is Named After Iowan Lost at Just 21 in WWI

Merle D. Hay

One of the most well-known and oldest malls in the entire state of Iowa opened in 1959. It’s named after a man who died more than four decades earlier. Merle Hay Plaza in Des Moines opened on August 17, 1959. It was originally to be named Northland Shopping Center. Executives from Younkers, its first anchor store, believed the mall should be named Merle Hay. The road in front of the shopping area under construction was already called Merle Hay Road,  something that had happened not long after its namesake had died in 1917. Click here to read more about Merle Hay himself and his the shopping center named for him that became a Mall in 1972.


Nominations for 6th Annual Henry Johnson Award For Distinguished Community Service Open in Albany, NY

Henry Johnson

The City of Albany is soliciting nominations for the Henry Johnson Award for Distinguished Community Service, which recognizes an Albany resident who has given their time and talent to Albany and has displayed community leadership in any of the following areas: arts and history, social justice, education, or volunteerism.  The Award will be presented at Albany’s Riverfront Jazz Festival on Saturday, September 10. Click here to learn more about the award, given to commemorate the acts of valor by Sgt. Johnson during combat in WWI, which earned Sgt. Johnson the Medal of Honor. The award also recognizes the courage Sgt. Johnson exhibited when he returned home to the United States and spoke out against racism in the military and in Jim Crow America.


World War I Aviation Weekend at The American Heritage Museum in September

American Heritage Museum 1917 Nieuport 28 restoration

The American Heritage Museum presents the first annual World War I Aviation Special Event Weekend at the museum and airfield in Hudson / Stow, MA, on September 17 and 18, 2022. The weekend will feature the official unveiling of the museum’s original 1917 Nieuport 28 restoration project. Click here to find out more about the exciting lineup of World War I aircraft that will be flying, as well as the extraordinary American classic automobiles, historic tanks, armored vehicles, and WWI military artifacts that will be on display during the event.


Duty, Terror and Survival: The World War One Diary and Art of Doughboy Cpl. Harold W. Pierce

Duty, Terror and Survival cover

“As a former journalist and an avid history reader, I believe wholeheartedly that some stories MUST be told. One of those is Harold W. Pierce’s story – his diary, really – of his experiences with the 112th Infantry Regiment (28th Division) in World War One.” So begins author William J. Welch in telling the story of how a chance encounter with the existence of Pierce’s diary while reading a book about the Meuse-Argonne campaign led him to look for and find the soldier, diarist, and artist, and publish an edited version of the WWI diary. Click here to read more, and learn how Welch discovered that “I thought I had a decent idea” of what the WWI soldiers’ experience was like, “but reading Pierce’s diary taught me so much more.”


Wanda “Lynne” Dayton, 1939–2022

Lynne Dayton

Lynne Dayton was the wife of 52 years of World War I Centennial Commission Executive Director and Doughboy Foundation Chairman Daniel Dayton.
Lynne was born 8/2/1939 in Rockwood, TN, and passed away 7/25/2022 at age 82 in Washington, DC.

Click here to read more about Lynne.


Doughboy MIA for August

Wallace Green

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Our Doughboy MIA this month Sergeant Wallace Green, DSC. Very little is known about Wallace Green’s early life. He was born and raised in the little town of Eure, North Carolina and may very well have been a pre-war soldier, serving with the 9th Cavalry. What is known is that he sailed as a corporal from Hoboken, New Jersey, bound for ‘Over There’ aboard the transport Covington on 09APR1918, assigned to Company M, 6th Infantry Regiment, 5th ‘Red Diamond’ Division.

The 6th Infantry Regiment is one of the oldest of the ‘regular army’ regiments in the army inventory, tracing its roots back to 1812. In November 1917, while still in the States, the 6th was assigned to the assembling 5th Division. Then once overseas, when the 1st US Army was organized in France to bring off the St. Mihiel Offensive, which began on 12SEPT1918, the 5th Division was one of the divisions assigned to it on 10AUG1918. At that time, however, the division was serving in the Vosges Sector and preparing for a limited offensive of its own. It was during that limited offensive that SGT Green disappeared.

At 4:04 am on the morning of 17AUG1917, after a 10-minute artillery barrage, the 6th Infantry Regiment launched an attack against the village of Frapelle in that sector. Two minutes into the attack, a heavy German counter barrage began to fall on the American trenches and the attacking Doughboys. Nevertheless, the 6th pressed on doggedly and by 6:30 am had reached and liberated the town of Frapelle, freeing it from four years of German occupation. By then however Sergeant Wallace Green wasn’t with them; he had been killed in action during the initial attack, in the process earning the Distinguished Service Cross. Reports of him being both KIA and MIA appear simultaneously in papers back home as early as 24SEPT1918. On 05OCT1919 his award of the DSC was officially announced:

GREEN, Wallace Sergeant, Company M, 6th Infantry.
For extraordinary heroism in action at Frapelle, France, August 17, 1918. He unhesitatingly and with great coolness and courage went forward under a heavy enemy barrage to destroy wire entanglements and continued this hazardous work until killed.
General Orders No. 15, War Department, 1919

Sergeant Green’s name is among the 284 names which grace the Tablets of the Missing at the beautiful St. Mihiel American Cemetery at Thiaucourt, France.

Want to help us solve Sgt. Green’s case? Consider making a tax-deductible donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Every penny goes toward our mission. Got only $10? Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Merchandise from the Official
Doughboy Foundation WWI Store

Morning Java Candle Mug

Soy Candle
Camp Mug

On sale now!

  • Doughboy.shop Exclusive
  • This replica tin mug has been upcycled into an all-natural soy candle filled by Charleston Candleworks (USA)
  • Made from all organic soy wax, cotton wick, essential oils
  • The “Morning Java” scent will fill the room with a wonderful coffee aroma that includes just a hint of chocolate
  • Camp mug is reusable once candle has burned down
  • Makes a great 2-in-1 gift. (Reduce + Reuse)

Proceeds from the sale of these mugs will help build the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the Doughboy Foundation.



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Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

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Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


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Doughboy MIA


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William Jonathan Bock

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

William Jonathan Bock

Submitted by: Brandt “Bob” Bock {Son}

Story of Service

This story of service is being submitted on behalf of all of William Bock’s ten children, (four alive and six deceased) his grandchildren, great-grandchildren, great great-grandchildren, and descendants yet to be born.

Our father, William Jonathan Bock, (better known as “Bill”) was not one to discuss or even touch upon his military and World War I experience. That part of his life was over, he was now on to much more important things such as raising a large family and working, working, ever working. Fortunately we do have some of his military records and a letter to be able to recognize his stellar contributions to the effort to defeat Germany during World War I.

It is noteworthy to mention that Germany is where his ancestors lived and immigrated from, but our father was an American and was proud to be!!

We know from his “Enlistment Record” that at age 19, he left his parents small farm in Smith Mills, New York to enlist in the U.S. Army on April 19th, 1917 at Buffalo, New York. After locating a copy of his service card we know he, along with other recruits, were transported to what was known then as the Columbus Barracks in Columbus, Ohio for the beginning of his basic training.

Read William Jonathan Bock’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Honor the Stories of Service of ALL Who Served.

Do Your Bit to Help Build the new National World War I Memorial.

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WWI DISPATCH July 2022

A monthly newsletter from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission, which may be of interest to members.


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July 2022

National WWI Memorial construction time lapse video

The National WWI Memorial Construction In A Minute video reveals that building the Memorial was monumental in its own right. It was accomplished during a raging global pandemic with its associated challenges of supply chain, labor, and safety. This video salutes all those whose dedication, sweat, and toil went into realizing this tribute to our Doughboys and all those who served in the name of Liberty and Freedom just over a century ago.

The Doughboy Foundation partners with “Google Arts & Culture”

Google Arts & Culture logo

Google Arts & Culture is a non-commercial initiative from Google that puts the treasures, stories and knowledge of over 2,000 cultural institutions from 80 countries at everyone’s fingertips and the Doughboy Foundation is honored to be among them. Earlier in the spring of 2022, the Doughboy Foundation officially became a “Google Arts & Culture” partner focusing on the platform’s unique storytelling capabilities. Now the Foundation has launched our first “story” on the platform in time for Juneteenth. We invite you to our newly launched Google Arts & Culture site and encourage you to dig into the self-guided interactive story with its historical archival footage, still images and contemporary performance by the 369th Experience. Click here to read the story of the band that brought jazz to Europe, and a new perspective to the Home Front after World War I.


Doughboy Foundation Legacy Society enables planned giving support

The Doughboy Foundation Legacy Society

The Doughboy Foundation is pleased to offer planned giving opportunities for individuals who wish to join our Legacy
Society and help preserve a vibrant, experiential Memorial for future generations. The Doughboy Foundation’s mission is to “keep faith with the American Doughboy” by ensuring all those who served in World War I are not forgotten. Click here to learn how your gift for the Doughboy Foundation can help fund the Memorial’s visitor programs in perpetuity, inspiring future generations of visitors and forever honoring not only our World War I veterans, but all U.S. servicemen and women.


369th Experience at Kennedy Center 2022

The 369th Experience plays at Kennedy Center in D.C. during Juneteenth Musical Salute Forward March for Freedom

The 369th Experience participated in a series of events and performances last month in Washington, DC, in recognition of Juneteenth, Black Music Month and the military and musical contributions of the 369th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Harlem Hellfighters. Forward March for Freedom brought band students from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other schools across the country to Washington, DC to participate in a series of events and performances, highlighted by a performance on the Millennium Stage at the Kennedy Center for the performing Arts. Click here to learn more about the 369th Experience and watch video of their Kennedy Center Performance. 


Efforts Renewed for Congressional Gold Medal to Honor World War I ‘Hello Girls’

Military Officers Association of America logo

The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) recently published an article urging its members to support the effort underway in the Senate to gain sponsors for the proposed Congressional Gold Medal to honor the “Hello Girls,” the pioneering World War I Army Signal Corps Female Telephone Operators Unit, which is receiving renewed bipartisan attention in the House and Senate. Click here to read the article, and find out how MOAA members (and non-members!) can support the effort to recognize the Hello Girls, who provided critical communications as switchboard operators on the WWI front lines.


Letters That You Will Not Get:
Women’s Voices from the Great War

Letters that you will not get

Letters That You Will Not Get: Women’s Voices from the Great War gives voice to American, British, European, Asian, African and Caribbean women affected by WWI through a series of vignettes that share their responses to the war—from enthusiasm to resignation; support to opposition; the war’s beginning to its end. Combining powerful contemporary music with excerpts from women’s writings on both sides of the conflict, Letters tells the story of the Great War as experienced by the women who lived through it. Click here to read more about this wonderful new opera, and learn how you can attend the premiere in Brooklyn later this month.


What Makes American Music American? The World War I Connection

Joshua Villanueva

There’s nothing more American than growing up in a multi-racial community, checking out K-pop videos on the internet, and showing off your latest dance moves on TikTok for the world to see. But have you wondered what exactly makes something American?”  So begins Joshua Villanueva’s thoughtful look at composer Aaron Copeland, and how the very concept of “American Music” (like so many other things) actually emerged from the nation’s experience in World War I,  Click here to read the entire article, and watch video of Joshua conducting a performance of Copeland’s Appalachian Spring


Finding Pvt. Henry V. Traynham

Pvt. Henry V. Traynham

An offhand remark by a relative was a “revelation” for Matt Mabe: he “never knew my great grandfather had a brother who had also served in WWI and had been killed in combat.” Spurred by a lifelong interest in military history, Mabe set out to learn more about his great-great uncle Henry V. Traynham. The search took years, including a trip to the the American Cemetery at Saint-Mihiel, and finally another family revelation. Click here to read the whole story of Mabe’s search, and how it came to a fitting end at the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.


A Promising Young Man: The Life and Times of a Casualty in World War One

Thomas ( Raysor Summers

The memory of how “In 1942 when I was eight years old, I accompanied my paternal grandmother, father, mother and brother in seeing the acclaimed and Academy Award movie Sergeant York in an Orangeburg, South Carolina theater” was the initial catalyst for Thomas A. Summers’s lifetime interest in “this young uncle whose name I carry” Thomas Raysor Summers (left), who was killed in action in WWI. As the Centennial of WWI came around, the long-held interest led Summers to research and write an amazing narrative about his uncle, after whom an American Legion Post in Orangeburg is now named. Get comfortable in your seat, then click here to read the absolutely fascinating and unforgettable story of the life, times, family, and wartime death of Sergeant Thomas Raysor Summers, U.S. Army.


Journey Log: Centennial

John Sterkendries

When his daughter moved from Belgium to Pittsburgh, PA in 1917 to study at Duquesne University, John Sterkendries became a frequent visitor to the U.S. After several years, he decided to buy a motorcycle here and see the country. On his local first ride, in a small town named Glassport, he “was astounded by the fact that every lamppost had a picture of a U.S. soldier attached to it. This kind of veteran pride is something that is unheard of in Belgium.” Back in Belgium, after visiting the WWI Memorial at Ypres, John became a man with a plan, one that would return him to the U.S. again and again. Click here to read the whole story about his inspiration, his mission, and how unexpected events have reshaped his intended “ride along the outer borders of the continental United States.”


Writing “On Assignment -The Great War”

On Assignment -The Great War cover

Writer Joseph Caro “decided to look-up some grade-school chums back in New Jersey that I hadn’t seen since 1957.” One conversation led to a discussion of his classmate’s grandfather, Eddie Jackson, a New York City news photographer a century ago. One thing led to another, and Caro ended up with a new book, On Assignment: The Great WarClick here to learn the incredible story of a photographer who used his connection to President Woodrow Wilson (among others) to talk his way into an Army uniform, a troop ship to France with the famous New York 27th Division, a front-row vantage point on the war and the peace negotiations, and a return visit to France in 1930 as the guide and head of the first delegation of Gold Star women.


“The Great War Through a Doughboy’s Eyes”: Miramar Beach veteran honors grandfather in new book

The Great War Through A Doughboy's Eyes cover

“The Great War Through a Doughboy’s Eyes” chronicles the service of Cpl. Howard P. Claypoole as told through the lens of his grandson and Miramar Beach resident Gregory S. Valloch. Claypoole served in the U.S. Army during World War I and was awarded a Purple Heart posthumously. Like his grandfather, Col. Gregory S. Valloch is an Army veteran who honorably served during the Gulf War. Click here to read more about the book, and how, using his grandfather’s diary entries, postcards, letters, wound order, newspaper clippings, military history and discharge papers, Valloch tells the story of a man with an unwavering allegiance to his country and a will to survive.


Scotch Plains Dedicates Street to Fallen WWI Soldier Sgt. Herbert Terry

Herbert Terry

The Township of Scotch Plains dedicated a sign to fallen soldier Sgt. Herbert Terry on Rahway Rd. on Friday, July 1. Sgt. Terry was killed in action on Sept. 24, 1918, in France during World War I after saving a fellow solider from gunfire. Sgt. Charles Wolfel, whom Terry saved, and who was captured and taken prisoner by the German army, said that Terry’s final words were: “Tell them I died fighting for my country.” The Terry family has lived in Scotch Plains since the time of the Revolutionary War. Click here to read the entire article.


Switchboard Soldiers: one of the great untold stories of World War I

Switchboard Soldiers

From New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Chiaverini comes Switchboard Soldiers, a bold, revelatory novel about one of the great untold stories of World War I–the women of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, who broke down gender barriers in the military, smashed the workplace glass ceiling, and battled a pandemic as they helped lead the Allies to victory. The women of the U.S. Army Signal Corps served with honor and played an essential role in achieving the Allied victory. Click here to read more about Switchboard Soldiers, and learn why their story has never been the focus of a novel…until now.


Harold A. Furlong: Michigan’s Only Native Son to Receive the Congressional Medal of Honor in World War I

Harold A Furlong

Harold Furlong was born in Pontiac, Michigan Aug. 1, 1895 where he was raised and graduated from Pontiac High School. He interrupted his college education at Michigan Agricultural College (later became Michigan State University) when he joined the U.S. Army in 1917. First Lieutenant Harold A. Furlong was recommended for the Congressional Medal of Honor by General John Pershing for his heroic action on Nov. 1, 1918. Click here to learn more about Furlong’s heroics, and how his postwar professional accomplishments also left an enduring legacy in Michigan, including an American Legion post named in his honor. 


The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Centennial Commemoration Lecture Series

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with flowers

In the months after the 2021 centennial of the creation of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the team at Arlington National Cemetery (ANC) has continued to make the programs created for this anniversary accessible to the public online.  On May 30, 2022—Memorial Day—ANC released a major virtual project as part of this ongoing effort: the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Centennial Commemoration Lecture Series. Click here to read more, and learn how this virtual lecture series originated during the culminating week of the Tomb Centennial. 


WWI Choctaw Code-Talkers in the news

Lots of articles recently about the Choctaw Code-Talkers of WWI:

Museum of Native American History logo

The Museum of Native American History in Arkansas partner with the Choctaw Nation for a presentation of the Choctaw Code Talkers for Memorial Day. Click here to learn more about and watch the video of this introduction to the Choctaw Code Talkers, recognizing the Choctaw veterans of WWI and discussing their history and lives as telephone warriors.

Choctaw Code Talkers aircraft art

The Oregon Air National Guard held a ceremony recently to dedicate the nosecone of one of their F-15 Eagle fighter aircraft with artwork that honors the Choctaw Code Talkers who served in WWI. Click here to see the art in place on the fighter jet, and read how the designers of the nose art was inspired by learning the history of the Choctaw Code Talkers from WWI.

Code Talker James Edwards

On the Atlas Obscura web site, puzzle aficionado and writer Alex Bellos discusses the Code Talkers, and how “Choctaw was a good choice, linguistically speaking, for a military code because the language is notoriously complicated and unlike other languages.” Click here to read more, and learn about efforts “to keep the Choctaw language modern, as it is still a very living language.”


WWI and the Bathing Suit: “Fashion Decrees Satin and Wool Jersey for Bathing Suits This Summer!”

Bathing Suits postwar

Writing in The Indiana History Blog, Jill Weiss Simins notes that “Bathing suits and policing decency have often been a topic of discussion and contention.”  However, “while looking through reels of newspapers from 1916-17, we became intrigued by the affect of World War One on the loosening of gendered fashion restrictions, especially as exemplified by the bathing suit.” Click here to read (and see) how World War I changed fashion (including women’s bathing attire) dramatically in large part because women’s roles had changed.


World War I News Digest July 2022

Shipyard

World War I was The War that Changed the World, and its impact on the United States continues to be felt a century later, as people across the nation learn more about and remember those who served in the Great War. Here’s a collection of news items from the last month related to World War I and America.

Borough Owes Boatload to WWI-Era Shipping Magnate

Hill 204: The 28th Division’s first combat action of WWI

Online fundraiser for American WWI hero’s headstone in Derry

Was ‘badass Marine’ denied a medal of honor for WWI valor?

The Great War in Color: Apocalypse World War I 

The Battle of Belleau Wood During WWI

The American Red Cross World War I Effort

Commissioners split on relocating World War I monument

Community raises $18K to refurbish 91-year-old WWI monument

Best Memorial to WWI Dead Would be Service to the Living

Gold Coast’s rich history and role in World War I

Thousands more died so World War I would end at 1100

Who Really Blew Up Mare Island in World War I?

Chip Forbes, long-time friend of the Doughboy Foundation


Doughboy MIA for July 2022

Earl Edward Jones

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Our Doughboy MIA this month this time around is a little different, as he isn’t actually MIA anymore!

Private Earl Edward Jones was born January 9th, 1894, in Meyersdale Pennsylvania. He was one of the TEN children that William and Mary Jones stocked their household with! His father William died of a stroke in December 1915, so Earl went to work, taking his father’s place as a coal miner in order to help support the family.

On May 31st 1917, Earl joined the Pennsylvania National Guard, figuring it to be the best way to get overseas faster. He was assigned to Company C of the 10th PA Guard which, upon federalization on July 15th of that year became Company C of the 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Division, training in part at Camp Hancock, Georgia. With the 110th he sailed for France aboard the City of Calcutta on May 3rd, 1918.

That summer, the 28th was engaged in the fighting around the Fismes sector and the Marne Valley.  It was there, on July 15th 1918 – exactly one year to the day that Earl’s unit had entered federal service – that during fighting outside the hamlet of Sauvigny, Earl and several of his comrades were captured. In a statement given to the C company commander, Captain William C. Truxal,  by Earl’s corporal, Herbert Jones (no relation) reads: “I helped to carry Private Earl E. Jones across the Marne River after having been taken prisoner. His left leg was blown off below the knee, he was bleeding profusely, and he was unconscious.  We put him down on the north side of the river and were not permitted to move him. Later on, one of the men told me that they had buried him in the Marne River.” The burial had been very hurried as the Germans were in no mood to let the doughboys honor their dead and they were quickly hustled off to a detention location before being sent off to a prison camp. Consequently, the grave went unmarked.

Click here to read the rest of the story!

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Merchandise from the Official
Doughboy Foundation WWI Store

Books --Lest We Forget & Honoring the Doughboys

Lest We Forget: The Great War World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library. One of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission and is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and what would become the Air Force. It serves as a lasting reminder that our world ignores the history of World War I (and the ensuing WWII) at its peril―lest we forget.

Honoring the Doughboys: Following My Grandfather’s World War I Diary is a stunning presentation of contemporary photographs taken by the author that are paired with diary entries written by his grandfather, George A. Carlson, who was a soldier in the U.S. Army during World War I. Jeff Lowdermilk followed his grandfather’s path through France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany and returned with these meticulously crafted photographs and his own engaging stories that bring the diary to life for contemporary readers. Lowdermilk’s passion for World War I and military history began as a young boy when he listened to his grandfather tell his stories about serving as an infantryman– a “Doughboy”–in Europe during the Great War.

Proceeds from the sale of these books will help finish the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the Doughboy Foundation.



WWI Memorial Visitor Guide App map screen

Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

QR Code for Virtual Explorer App download


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Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


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John Simon Hilgenhold

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John Simon Hilgenhold

Submitted by: John Levi Hilgenhold {Great-Grandson}

John Simon Hilgenhold was born in 1892. John Hilgenhold served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

My great-grandfather, John Simon Hilgenhold, was born on March 24, 1892 in a rural community, known as St. Marks, in Perry County Indiana. The grandson of Dutch-German immigrants, he was the seventh of eleven children. As a young man he completed his education after the eighth grade, as was customary for the time, and worked on the family farm with his father and three brothers.

John registered for the draft on June 5, 1917 at the age of 25. Just under a year later, on May 28, 1918 he was drafted into service of the U.S. National Army and reported to Camp Zachary Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky along with forty-eight other Perry County men. One of whom, Carl Goelzer, would eventually become his brother-in-law. He trained as an infantryman with the 44th Company, 11th Battalion, 159th Depot Brigade and completed basic training on June 16th.

He was then transferred to Company M, 153rd Infantry Regiment, 39th National Guard Division that was stationed at Camp Beauregard near Alexandria, Louisiana. This influx of new recruits brought the division up to full strength and they set sail from Newport News, Virginia a little over a month later on August 6th aboard the S.S. Kursk, a converted British troop transport. Upon arrival in Brest, France, the 153rd traveled to the St. Florent region, southwest of Bourges, until it was dismantled and its personnel sent to replace battlefield losses in existing combat divisions.

Private Hilgenhold was transferred to Company C, 126th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division on September 13th. Days later, the division mobilized in preparation of the Meuse-Argonne offensive, the largest battle in American history to date.

Read John Simon Hilgenhold’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Honor the Stories of Service of ALL Who Served.

Do Your Bit to Help Build the new National World War I Memorial.

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WWI DISPATCH Juneteenth 2022 Special Issue

An appropriate item for today from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission.


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Juneteenth 2022 Special Issue

369th Experience NYC 2019

The 369th Experience performing in New York’s Rockefeller Center in 2019. The band, which is made up of music students from Historically Black Colleges and Universities across the U.S., plays the musical repertoire of New York’s legendary 369th Regiment “Harlem Hellfighters” Regimental Jazz Band.

Juneteenth Musical Salute in DC to the
369th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Harlem Hellfighters

369th Experience logo

The 369th Experience, an official program of the US World War I Centennial Commission, is hosting a series of events and performances this weekend in Washington, DC, in recognition of Juneteenth, Black Music Month and the military and musical contributions of the 369th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Harlem Hellfighters. Forward March for Freedom will bring band students from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other schools across the country to Washington, DC to participate in a series of events and performances, highlighted by several public performances Saturday, June 18, and Sunday June 19.

The 369th Experience’s re-creation band is comprised of 65 African American and Puerto Rican male band members from 17 HBCUs and other schools in the United States.

The 369th Experience performances on Juneteenth weekend are listed below. You can follow the preparations of the 369th Experience on the Doughboy Foundation Facebook page leading up to the weekend events.

Saturday, June 18

White House to WWI Memorial March 8:00 a.m.

1919 Victory Parade

On Saturday, June 18, the 369th Experience will form up for a Symbolic March from The White House to the National World War I Memorial site. Marching with them will be “The President’s Own” US Marine Band, as well as the descendants of the original 369th Regimental Band’s leaders James Reese Europe and Noble Sissle. The parade route (from in front of the White House to 15th St. NW, south on 15th Street to the Memorial site at Pennsylvania Ave.) will follow in reverse the 1919 victory parade on Pennsylvania Ave. that ended at the White House.

National WWI Memorial Concert 9:00 a.m.

369th at Memorial site

The 369th Experience and “The President’s Own” US Marine Band will perform in concert at the National World War I Memorial starting at 9:00 a.m. Located on Pennsylvania Ave. NW between 14th. and 15th. streets, the Memorial offers ample amphitheater step seating for the free & open to the public concert.

Kennedy Center Concert 6:00 p.m.

369th at Kennedy Center

The 369th Experience will perform a free  live (and live-streamed) concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Millennium Stage. Click here for more information on how to reserve free tickets to attend the live event in person at Kennedy Center Saturday, or how to watch the live stream of the concert from home.

Sunday, June 19

Something in the Water Festival 7:00 p.m.

Something in the Water

The 369th Experience will perform in concert with singer and songwriter Jon Batiste as part of the Something in the Water Festival in Washington, DC at 7:00 p.m. (scheduled) on Sunday, June 19. Click here to learn more about the Festival taking place June 17-19, and how to purchase tickets for the event.


James Reese Europe sheet music

The 369th Experience was created to acknowledge, educate, and preserve the legacy of The 369th Infantry Regiment, a regiment made up of African American and Puerto Rican soldiers who were not allowed to fight with their fellow Americans in World War I due to their race. Instead they braved the battlefield alongside French soldiers and went on to become one of the longest-serving, most decorated units of the American Expeditionary Force. In addition to their bravery on the battlefield, the Harlem Hellfighters were brilliant musicians who introduced ragtime, big band and jazz to the world, changing the course of music forever.

The band has performed music from the original 369th Regimental Infantry Band’s musical repertoire at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the National Museum of African American History & Culture, and Rockefeller Center and the opening of The Shed in New York.

The Juneteenth events by the 369th Experience are sponsored by the Doughboy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, Google, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the National Basketball Association (NBA), the National Basketball Players Association Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.


The Harlem Hellfighters of World War I

369th soldiers

By the end of World War I, the Croix de Guerre, France’s highest military honor, would be awarded to the 369th Infantry Regiment. Better known as the Harlem Hellfighters, the regiment was an all-black American unit serving under French command in World War I, and they spent a stunning 191 days at the Front, more than any other American unit. In that time, they never lost a trench to the enemy or a man to capture. Instead, they earned the respect of both allies and enemies, helped introduce Jazz to France, and returned home to a grateful city where hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers turned out to welcome home 3,000 Hellfighter heroes in a victory parade that stretched from 23rd Street and 5th Avenue to 145th Street and Lenox. Click here to read more, and learn how the 369th’s postwar reception was much different from the way New York sent them off to war.


369th group

Who Are They?
Men in the 369th Infantry Iconic Photo

The photo above was taken on February 12, 1919, as soldiers from the 369th Infantry Regiment were waiting to disembark in New York on their way home from the Great War in Europe. This photo is one of several iconic photos of the 369th Infantry. Few of them, however, were accompanied by captions giving the soldiers’ names or anything about them. The 369th Infantry, whose members called themselves Harlem’s Rattlers, was the most famous all-Black regiment to fight during World War I. By the end of the war, France awarded the regiment the Croix de Guerre, and one hundred-seventy-one of the regiment’s men received individual Croix de Guerre medals for their valor.  Click here to read more, and learn more about the individual soldiers pictured in the famous photo, and how the 369th “helped to establish to the entire world the power of black soldiers in the military.”



Virtual Explorer logo new

Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

QR Code for Virtual Explorer App download


Education Thumb Drive image

Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


Donation for Daily Taps


you can help - shop using amazon smile



Doughboy MIA


Pershing Sponsors

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