Tag Archives: World War One Centennial Commission

WWI DISPATCH March 31, 2021

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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March 31, 2021

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With only two weeks to go, we are counting down the days until we raise the Flag of the United States of America for the first time over the newly constructed National WWI Memorial in Washington, DC. We are honored to celebrate this momentous occasion with each of you via live broadcast on April 16. Please click on the video above to hear more from our host, Award-Winning Actor, Gary Sinise.

First Colors Ceremony will Introduce America’s New World War I Memorial

First Colors Logo

The United States World War I Centennial Commission in cooperation with the Doughboy Foundation, the National Park Service and the American Battle Monuments Commission is sponsoring a major event to celebrate the inaugural raising of the American flag over the nation’s soon-to-open World War I Memorial in Washington, DC on Friday, April 16 at 10:00 a.m. EDT / 7:00 a.m. PDT. Click here to read more about this milestone event, and find out how to register to view the live broadcast of the historic ceremony. (The First Colors Ceremony is not an in-person event.)


Senators introduce Gold Medal legislation to honor “Hello Girls”

Hello Girls gold medal snip

A bipartisan group of U.S. Senators has introduced legislation to award the Congressional Gold Medal to the female military telephone operators who kept American and French GIs connected during World War I. The Hello Girls Congressional Gold Medal Act would award the medal to the women of the U.S. Army Signal Corps. Also known as the Hello Girls, the bilingual female switchboard operators connected more than 150.000 calls per day during the war, doing so at a rate six times faster than their male counterparts. Senate Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Jon Tester, D-Mont., Ranking Member Jerry Moran, R-Kan., Sens. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., and Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., introduced the legislation. Click here to read more about this new effort to recognize the Hello Girls with the Congressional Gold Medal.


How World War I’s Legacy Eclipsed the Deadly 1918 Pandemic

Doughboy pandemic snip

World War I came to an end on November 11, 1918—nine months after the first cases of what was referred to as the “Spanish Flu” were reported in the United States. Against the backdrop of the war, the 1918 influenza pandemic surged at a time when people were already experiencing scarcity in everyday supplies, coping with having loved ones serving overseas, and living in a wartime economy. A second global crisis had started before the first one ended. Click here to read more about how the legacy of World War I overshadowed the pandemic, making the unprecedented loss of life from the flu almost an afterthought.


WWI Helped Women Ditch the Corset

Corset article snip

Massive cultural shifts during and after World War I helped free women from confining roles—and the confining corsets that bound them to the previous age. Writing on the History.com web site, Jessica Pearce Rotondi notes that “The evolution of the bra re-shaped the image of what a woman could be, whether she was serving in the war effort, fighting for the right to vote, or dancing in a flapper-style dress at war’s end.” Click here to read more, and learn how an American socialite patented the “brassiere” on November 3, 1914, the year World War I broke out in Europe. 


Kentucky soldier’s New Testament headed to National WWI Museum

Arthur J. Douthitt

Nearly 100 years have passed since a New Testament carried by Arthur J. Douthitt into battle during World War I made its way back to his widow in Kentucky from France. Now, it will be donated to the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, MO. Nicole Morton Goeser said she wants to share the story of her great uncle, a native of Stanley, KY with his own community. Click here to read more, and learn about how this Kentucky soldier’s Bible became and will remain a touchstone for memory of his service.


‘Hello Girls’ Kept World War I Communications Humming

Hello Girls 2

As the first American forces began arriving in France that summer, they found the communications network in disarray. In three years of combat, telephone lines were shot, shelled and bombed faster than they could be repaired. Army Gen. John J. Pershing, commander of American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, found this situation intolerable. He had, however, noted the efficiency and competence of Britain’s Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps as they expertly kept England-based phone lines humming. Click here to learn more about how Pershing, having recognized a good idea when he saw one, created the Hello Girls that supported the American Expeditionary Forces so effectively in WWI.


George Dilboy was first Greek-American awarded Medal of Honor in World War I

George Dilboy

Born in the Greek settlement of Alatsata, which is today located in western Turkey, George Dilboy and his family emigrated to America in 1908 when he was 12 years old. After returning to Greece to fight as a volunteer in the Greek Army in the First and Second Balkan Wars, Dilboy came back to Somervill, MA in 1914, where he went to school and worked for a few years before volunteering to fight in the U.S. Army in the Mexican Border War from 1916 – 1917, and then re-joining the U.S. Army as a private first class to fight in the trenches of France during World War I. Click here to read more, and learn about George Dilboy, who General John Pershing listed as one of the 10 greatest heroes of the war. 


The American farmers, gardeners, and victory gardens of World War I

Fruits of Victory poster

During WWI, Europe’s food supply had been seriously depleted. European farmers had been called to serve on the front lines, abandoning their farms and resulting in a mass farming crisis. Farmlands were quickly turned into battlefields, causing significant destruction of once rich soil. Europe’s ability to keep its soldiers and general population fed was becoming more and more difficult. As a result, the United States was called upon to shoulder the demand for mass quantities of food that was desperately needed overseas. Click here to learn more about the development of the National War Garden Commission in response to the food crisis that raged in Europe.


Commemorative Bricks Support Local Maryland WWI Memorial Restoration

Bladensburg memorial snip

A 40-foot-tall monument standing at the intersections of Bladensburg Road, Baltimore Avenue, and Annapolis Road in Bladensburg, Maryland, serves as a reminder of the 49 area residents who died in World War I. This monument, commonly referred to as the Peace Cross, is owned by the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Department of Parks and Recreation in Prince George’s County which has embarked on a mission to restore it. Click here to learn more about the Peace Cross, and the commemorative brick program developed by the department to support fundraising efforts for the Peace Cross’ restoration.


NY National Guardsman Led Fight for Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Hamilton Fish III

The United States has a Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers today because a New York National Guard Major and freshman Congressman thought it was necessary 100 years ago. Hamilton Fish III, a 32-year old lawyer with a Harvard degree who could trace his roots back to the beginnings of New York, led Company K of what became known as the 369th Infantry Regiment, which went down in history as the Harlem Hellfighters. He earned a Silver Star, and the French War Cross. Fish thought that the United States, which had suffered 116,516 deaths – 53,402 in combat and 63,114 to disease– between April 1917 and November 1918, should have a memorial to an American Unknown Soldier. Click here to learn more about how Fish, then a Congressman, introduced the federal resolution to create an Unknown Soldier memorial on November 11, 1921.


The Jihad Legacy of World War I

Wolfgang G. Schwanitz

Writing for the Foreign Policy Research Institute web site, Senior Fellow in the Middle East Program Wolfgang G. Schwanitz notes that “Known as a pious Muslim, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi said in 2015 that it is most difficult to change religious rhetoric and how people use their faith. The outcomes will take many years: ‘Radical misconceptions [of Islam] were instilled 100 years ago. Now we can see the results.’ He may been referring to the German-Ottoman jihadization of Islamism in the early 20th century. So, what happened in World War I?” Click here to read the answer to Schwanitz’s question, and learn how yet another key geopolitical aspect of the 21st Century had its origins in the chaos of World War I.


Doughboy MIA for March 2021

Corporal William Michael Barnett

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Our Doughboy MIA this month is Corporal William Michael Barnett, USMC ASN271629, 84th Company/3rd Battalion/6th Marine Regiment/4th Brigade/2nd Division A.E.F.

Born in Oswego, New York on June 1st, 1892, Barnett enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on August 3rd, 1917 at Syracuse, New York. He trained at Parris Island, S.C. and upon graduation from basic training was assigned to the 119th Company at Quantico on January 8th, 1918. With them he departed for France on February 25th, 1918, where he received advanced combat training in the Toulon Sector.

In late May, with the Germans threatening Paris direct, the 2nd American Division received hurried orders to shore up crumbling French lines near Château-Thierry. The 6th Marine Regiment (which along with the 5th Marines and 6th Marine Machine Gun Battalion composed the 4th Brigade of the 2nd Division) took up positions southwest of Belleau Wood and was ordered to seize the town of Bouresches, as well as clear the southern half of Belleau Wood itself. The operation began on June 6th and these attacks were the beginning of a month-long struggle that resulted in both Marine Corps glory and heavy casualties.

On June 13th, 1918, Barnett received assignment to the 84th Company, 6th Marine Regiment as a replacement for a combat casualty. By that time, he was a Corporal. After 40 days in the sector, during which time the regiment would incur 2,143 casualties, the 6th Marines were pulled off the line for rest and refitment before again being brought into the maelstrom, this time in the Battle of Soissons.

On July 16th, the regiment was rushed to the Villers-Cotterets Forest where, on the morning of July 19th, 1918 the 6th Marines attacked in force, alone, from the town of Vierzy toward Tigny but were stopped short of their objective by extremely heavy artillery and machine gun fire. It would prove to be the single costliest day the regiment would ever face with many companies seeing upwards of 50% casualties and some as high as 70%.

It was during the attack forward that morning that Corporal Barnett was killed in action by a German sniper. He was later buried in a temporary grave in a field just outside Vierzy. However, following the war Graves Registration Service personnel were never able to locate that grave.

Want to do your part? Stand up and dig in with us by visiting www.ww1cc.org/mia.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official Doughboy Merchandise Store

First Colors Commemorative Coin 500

“First Colors” Commemorative Coin

Exclusive new design for 2021! Double-sided Bronze alloy medallion design commemorates the Doughboys of WWI, and the first raising of our nation’s flag over the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC on April 16, 2021. Two-Color Soft Enamel, 1.75″ in diameter.

Our mission is to remember those who served in WWI. These commemorative gifts help make that happen.


Memorial Camera

You can keep track of progress at the new National World War I Memorial through construction site time lapse video, or a live video feed from the site. Click here to take a look, and also find out how you can help finish this national tribute to the 4.7 million Americans who served, and the 116,516 who did not come home from WWI.


Virtual Explorer

Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

QR Code for Virtual Explorer App download


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Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


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Albert Robert Laske

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Albert Robert Laske

Submitted by: Jean Burns {granddaughter}

Albert Robert Laske was born around 1894. Albert Laske served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Feb. 1918, Albert “Bert” (24 yrs. old) received induction orders to enter the Army, during World War I. He is to serve in the 25th Spruce Squadron, Vancouver Barracks, in Vancouver Washington. This Squadron is to harvest wood that will be used to build the planes they need for the war. In Dec. 1918, Bert is discharged honorable and thanked for his service, but since the war is ending, his service is no longer needed.

About the 25th Spruce Squadron: “The states of Oregon and Washington form the backdrop for one of the most interesting dramas of the First World War. When the U.S. entered the War, it was quickly discovered that the nation had no capacity to build warplanes in quantity. Even though the U.S. had invented the airplane, by 1917 the European powers had already spent years developing it for warfare, and deploying it in deadly combat. Those nations were trying to produce enough machines to keep the skies occupied over the front lines in France.

Read Albert Robert Laske’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Honor the Stories of Service of ALL Who Served.

Do Your Bit to Help Build the new National World War I Memorial.

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WWI Memorial–Join us for a live broadcast of the First Colors Ceremony on April 16

This event may be of interest to our members.


Join us for a live broadcast of the inaugural raising of the flag of the United States of America over the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C. featuring award-winning actor Gary Sinise.

First Colors Ceremony Logo

Join us for a live broadcast of
the First Colors Ceremony on April 16

With less than a month to go, we are counting down the days until we raise the Flag of the United States of America for the first time over the newly constructed National WWI Memorial in Washington, DC.  We are honored to celebrate this momentous occasion with each of you via live broadcast on April 16. 

 

Please click on the video below to hear more from our host, Award-Winning Actor, Gary Sinise.

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Have you registered for the First Colors Ceremony? Click here to register.

For questions, please contact Lauren Hancock at 202.719.8063 or events@worldwar1centennial.org

 

INVITATION: Join us for a Live Broadcast of the World War I Memorial First Colors Ceremony

This event next week may be of interest to some of our members.


Join us for a live broadcast of the inaugural raising of the flag of the United States of America over the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C. featuring award-winning actor Gary Sinise.

 

Invitation to the First Colors Ceremony on April 16, 2021 at 10am Eastern

“Teaching & Learning WWI in 2021” WEBINAR VIDEO is posted

This recording may be of interest to some of our members or with any contacts our members may have in local schools.


Webinar poster: Strategies for teaching and learning about WWI in 2021
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The Webinar
is Posted for Viewing and Sharing:

An insightful hour for  EDUCATORS… and LEARNERS:
Held on Friday, February 26, 2021, 1pm EST

We assembled a group of educators from different parts of the US to explore issues of teaching WWI in the 2021 classroom and community environment, presented from a real-world practical perspective:

  • How teachers are adapting in teaching social studies, during the Pandemic
  • How do differing State standards affect strategies for teaching WWI
  • Practical approaches, best practices, and integration ideas when teaching WWI
  • Educational community engagement through WWI field explorations

FREE RESOURCES:
We also reviewed some of the EdTech (Education Technology) tools created by the US World War I Centennial Commission and the Doughboy Foundation during and after the Centennial of WWI.

  • A WWI Education Resource Website on a USB drive for download
  • A 100-page electronic WWI Genealogy Research Guide
  • Smartphone Apps that bring the new National WWI Memorial into classrooms

The webinar is now posted and available for viewing and sharing by clicking the button below. This includes links to many resources and downloads, plus a bonus download:
“WWI History in 20-pages”.

View The Webinar


Brought to you by the Doughboy Foundation

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Funding for this webinar was provided by The Doughboy Foundation.

To support the continuation of our webinar series and other educational programming and resources, please click the button below.

Support 

For questions about the Doughboy Foundation, please contact Halsey Hughes at halsey.hughes@doughboy.org .

WWI DISPATCH February 2021

A newsletter from the folks behind the World War One Centennial Commission.


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February 2021

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Dispatch subscribers: keep an eye on your email for a personal invitation to watch a Live Broadcast of The Inaugural Raising of the Flag of the United States of America over the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC, featuring award-winning actor Gary Sinese and many other notable speakers. Not a subscriber? Subscribe now to be sure you receive your own invitation to watch this historic broadcast.

Sculpture video NJ

It’s 58 feet long and 10 feet high:
New Jersey sculptor’s World War I monument will speak for a nation

An in-depth look at the process of creating the sculpture for the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC was recently published on the NorthJersey.com web site, and later picked up for national viewership by USA Today. Reporter Jim Beckerman interviews sculptor Sabin Howard and the whole team at his studio. Click here to read the entire interview, and watch the absorbing video.


Teaching and learning WWI in 2021 animated gif square

Last Chance: sign up for webinar today!

Click here to register TODAY to attend this FREE 2021 webinar for educators and learners about the challenges, opportunities and importance for teaching and learning about “The War That Changed the World”. “WWI Education Webinar: Strategies and Tools for Teaching (and Learning) WWI in 2021” on Feb 26, 2021 1:00 PM EST — today.

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/
register/1274955613107522318

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Can’t attend today? Register anyway to receive a link to the recording later.


New Book Gives Voice to the Men of the Famous Lost Battalion of World War I

The Lost Battalion: As They Saw It.

In the history of American participation in WWI, two stories remain the most recognized: that of Sergeant York, and that of the ‘Lost Battalion.’ Now another chapter in the tale of the Lost Battalion has been told in a new book by WWI author and historian Robert J. Laplander titled The Lost Battalion: As They Saw It. Most know the general story. Between October 2nd and October 7th, 1918 Major Charles Whittlesey of the 77th Division led nearly 700 men into the narrow Charlevaux Ravine during the battle in the Argonne Forest. They were quickly surrounded by the Germans and during their five-day siege in that ravine endured starvation, continual enemy attacks, a mistaken artillery barrage by their own forces, and an eventual casualty rate of nearly 72%. Click here to learn more about this new book that tells the Lost Battalion’s story through the words of its survivors..


Black heroes highlighted in call for Peace Cross restoration funding

Peace Cross MD

The Bladensburg World War I Memorial, known as the Peace Cross, in Prince George’s County, Maryland, which includes the names of four Black soldiers who died in World War I, needs money for restoration. Calls for funding are being made specifically during Black History Month. “Funds are needed to begin this vital endeavor. To address the need, the Department of Parks and Recreation is fundraising to repair the Peace Cross,” Department Resource Development Officer Tracy Wright said in a news release. “We encourage the community to join us and help support the restoration of this historical monument which honors our fallen Black heroes.” Click here to learn more about the Peace Cross, the heroes it honors, and how its restoration can be supported.


Women Answered Call in World War I

Marguerite Martin

In World War I telephone operators were needed in Europe. General John J. Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I, quickly saw that women—American women–would be better at telephone work than the men. The Signal Corps was all male, and they were not only assigned to string lines but to handle all communications, and were not doing well at the latter task. A call was put out throughout America for women to serve in Europe as operators. The preferred candidates were fluent in French and English. One of the women who answered the call was Marguerite Martin. Click here to read Marguerite’s story, and learn how important the “Hello Girls” were to the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I.


Des Moines Hosted First-Ever African American Officer Training camp

Des Moines graduates

A page of Des Moines history is also part of Black history. In 1917, a thousand African American college-educated young men came to Des Moines for the Officer Training Program. They were joined by 250 Black non-commissioned officers for training from May through October. “Des Moines has a really proud legacy of having Fort Des Moines, which is a camp where the first Black officers for the U.S. Army were trained,” said Leo Landis, curator of the State Historical Museum of Iowa. Click here to read more, and learn about one of the soldiers who came back after his military days: James B. Morris, who is remembered still at the State Historical Museum of Iowa.


Creede, CO and WWI—A Knitter’s Tale

Mary_Elting_Folsom

“Grandma, do you know how to knit?”

It was the summer of 2000 and eleven-year-old Lizzie, a beginning knitter, hoped she’d found a mentor—her ninety-four-year-old grandmother, Mary Elting Folsom. Lizzie’s question took Mary back to 1917, several months after the US entered World War I.

“Yes, Lizzie, I do know how to knit. I learned during the summer of 1917, when I was eleven. Surprisingly, my teacher was a British army recruiter who had come to my home town of Creede, Colorado.”

Located high in the San Juan mountains of southern Colorado, Creede was a silver mining town when Mary was born in 1906. Click here to read Mary’s story, and learn the surprising reason that a British army recruiter was there in 1917 to provide knitting lessons to her.


African American suffragist supported U.S. troops in World War I for YWCA

Addie Waites Hunton

When Kathy Coker was doing research at the Richmond, VA Public Library, In preparation for Black History Month, she uncovered the fascinating story of Addie Waites Hunton, an African American suffragist, activist, writer, political organizer, educator, and officer of the the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA). If all that wasn’t enough to make Hunton a noteworthy historical figure, she also became involved in the YMCA’s work abroad during World War I, travelling to France in June 1918 to work with the black troops of the American Expeditionary Forces. Click here to read the entire amazing story of Addie Waites Hunton, and the astonishing and outsized role she played in American history.


French-Built and American Flown: Meet the WWI Nieuport 28 Fighter Plane

Nieuport 28

When the United States military went “over there” to take on the Huns (the Germans) during the First World War, what it lacked in equipment it more than made up for in determination. This meant that Americans often relied on foreign equipment, and in the case of aircraft the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) used what it could get. After the French rejected the Nieuport 28C.1, which was introduced in mid-1917, in favor of the far sturdier and more advanced Spad XIII, the newly arrived Americans adopted the Nieuport 28 as a stop-gap measure, and quickly the American pilots made do with what they could. Click here to read more about how American aviators with obsolete equipment were nevertheless able to perform prodigious aviation feats in WWI. 


How Rockford’s WWI Camp Grant led to an African American community center

Rockford IL

Rockford, IL is home to one of the oldest African American community centers in Illinois, a direct descendant of World War I’s Camp Grant. For more than a year, Joyce Higgins has been the executive director of the African American Resource Center (AARC) at Booker Washington Community Center, 524 Kent St, but she’s been involved at the center for decades. “The Booker Washington Center would not even exist if it wasn’t for segregation,” she said. “It’s an excitement to tell this history…there’s so much of it.” Click here to read the story of how one of the 16 cantonments used to train soldiers in WWI gained a second life in the community after the conflict ended.


A rifle and a shovel — As a wagoner in World War I, early Pablo Beach, FL resident made his mark in history

Jesse Butler headstone

The oldest headstone in Lee Kirkland Cemetery, the historic African-American graveyard in Jacksonville Beach, belongs to Jessie Butler, a native Floridian who performed back-breaking work in a seaside mining camp known as Mineral City before serving his country overseas in World War I. The upright marble headstone, issued by the U.S. Government, denotes the little-known unit he served in during the war, and, most importantly, his rank – that of wagoner. Click here to read how Jesse Butler’s special capabilities played an important role supporting the U.S. Army in World War I.


Elgin’s Black Soldiers Served Proudly in U.S. Armed Forces during World War I

Elgin IL soldiers

In the period leading up to WWI, the 8th Regiment of the Illinois National Guard would make history. This unit would become known as the 370th U.S. Infantry and was made up entirely of Black soldiers, officers and commanders. The 370th Infantry would see combat in France, becoming the first U.S. regiment in the French region of Alsace-Lorraine. Among its ranks was Elgin’s own Lewis P. Andrews. Click here to read his story, and learn how the 370th fought with such distinction in France and Belgium that the Germans who fought them gave the soldiers the nickname of Schwarze Teufel, “Black Devils,” for their ferocity in combat.


WWI Changed Us: How the Philippines Shaped America’s First World War

Philippines and WWI

Ever since U.S. troops occupied the Philippines in 1898, generations of Filipinos have served in and alongside the U.S. Armed Forces, including during World War I. Join historian Christopher Capozzola at the National World War I Museum and Memorial as he reveals the forgotten history of the military relationship between the U.S. and Philippines from the colonial-era Philippine Scouts to the present day. Learn how military service in the Philippines shaped the worldview of key World War I military figures (including General John J. Pershing), and how World War I affected the Philippines and other U.S. colonies. Click here to register for the free Zoom webinar, and learn more about this forgotten chapter of America’s WWI experience.


Doughboy MIA for February

Samuel Roach

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Our Doughboy MIA this month is Private Samuel Roach. Born February 12th, 1886, in Bradford, Ohio, Private Roach was an employee of the E.C. Atkins Saw Works in Indianapolis when he enlisted in the U.S. Army on October 16th, 1917. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Kentucky for muster, he took his training at Washington D.C., where he was assigned to Company D, 6th Engineer Regiment, 3rd Division. He left for overseas on December 6th, 1917, and was killed in action on March 29th, 1918 near Villers Bretonneux. He is memorialized on the Walls of the Missing at the Somme American Cemetery, Bony, France. Interestingly, he was initially reported to the state of Indiana as having been returned and interred at Arlington national Cemetery.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Coin Group

2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar Set

No longer available from the U.S. Mint!

These Official World War I Centennial Silver Dollar Sets are still available here on the WWI Centennial Commission’s online gift shop.

NOTE: Each set comes with 2 separate coins. Each set will accompany the Official Doughboy Design alongside your choice of Military Branch.

“The United Mint certifies that this coin is a genuine 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar, minted and issued in accordance with legislation passed by Congress and signed by the President on December 16, 2014, as Public Law 113-212. This coin was minted by the Department of the Treasury, United States Mint, to commemorate the centennial of America’s involvement in World War I. This coin is legal tender of the United States.”

Coin stand personalized

Compliment your Centennial Silver Dollar with a special coin display stand with an engraved personalized plate to honor your World War I ancestor. This black wooden coin stand is 3-1/2 inches in height, 1-1/2 inches in width and 2-1/2 inches in length and features silver posts. This elegant stand is a perfect way to display your your Centennial Silver Dollar or any coins on your desk or shelf.

Proceeds from the sale of these items will help build the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Memorial Camera

You can keep track of progress at the new National World War I Memorial through construction site time lapse video, or a live video feed from the site. Click here to take a look, and also find out how you can help finish this national tribute to the 4.7 million Americans who served, and the 116,516 who did not come home from World War I.


Virtual Explorer

Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

QR Code for Virtual Explorer App download


Education Thumb Drive image

Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


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Poppy Seed Side Ad


Doughboy MIA


Pershing Sponsors

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Frank Clyde Mercer

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Frank Clyde Mercer

Submitted by: Michael Conn {Great Grandson}

Frank Clyde Mercer was born around 1887. Frank Mercer served in World War 1 with the United States Army Air Corps. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

The service of Franklin “Clyde” Mercer in the First World War began in support of the war effort as a 30-year-old, civilian, munitions worker for the Whitaker Glessner Company, a steel production company contracted to manufacture 155mm howitzer shells at its location in New Boston, a small Ohio village within the city of Portsmouth, Ohio.

Frank’s military draft paperwork show that he was employed with Whitaker Glessner on June 5, 1917, the date of his registration for the draft.

Eleven months later, on May 17, 1918, Frank would enter military service. He was accompanied by his uncle, Harzy Walls, 6 months his junior, who was also entering the service. Now 31 years of age, Frank departed the Ohio River Valley for Camp Sevier, a military training camp located in the upstate of South Carolina, near the city of Greenville.

It was here, following their formal induction and training into the Air Service of the National Army, that Harzy and Frank would part ways. Frank was assigned to the 15th Aero Construction Company as a carpenter and would spend the early summer months getting technical training at Camp Mills and Hazelhurst Field, near Garden City, New York while Harzy would train near Norfolk, Virginia at Camp Morrison with the 27th Balloon Company for the remainder of the war.

Read Frank Clyde Mercer’s entire Story of Service here.

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