Tag Archives: World War One Centennial Commission

Online Construction update and suggestions for WWI related videos

An update from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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Dear Friends and Colleagues:

Our prayers are with you and with our great nation as we work our way through the pandemic. Our Doughboys would all be forever grateful for your support and steadfastness.

The good news for this week is that construction continues and we have had no COVID-19 delays.

On Friday April 3, please join me for an online virtual tour and construction update of the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C. featuring the project’s lead designer Joe Weishaar, and project managers for Grunley Construction.

REGISTER

Meanwhile for those of you looking for some WWI themed video watching while stuck at home, here a few suggestions for some things to watch this weekend.


War and Remembrance 2

As many of you know, the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) is in discussions to partner with the National Parks Service for the maintenance of the Memorial when it is completed.  ABMC has been developing television programming for several years now, and you might find it interesting to revisit this program on the history of the AMBC by Thomas Conner, author of “War and Remembrance”:

Tom Conner: War and Remembrance: The Story of ABMC

lest we forget book cover

Some of you have copies of “Lest We Forget”on your coffee table.  You may not know that it draws heavily on the visual resources of the Pritzker Military Museum and Library.  Here’s a link to the making of “Lest We Forget”:

Michael Robbins: Lest We Forget

Soldiers Journey

Although many of you may have seen the short film called “A Soldier’s Journey”. I link to it again here for you to share as you wish:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVPtxDS3o5U

Influenza pandemic thumb

And finally some insights into the “other” pandemic –  the ‘Spanish flu’ pandemic of 1917-1918. This is from a just released video , part of our “How WWI Changed America” series, made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation:

https://vimeo.com/400627111


Stay safe,

Dans Signature

Daniel S. Dayton
Executive Director
U.S. World War One Centennial Commission


Update about the National WWI Memorial In Washington, D.C.

An item from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I hope each of you is staying safe in these challenging times. We are adapting to circumstances and progress continues to be made on the National World War I Memorial.
We are as determined as our Doughboys were a century ago.

All our staff members are working from home, and meetings with colleagues and prospective supporters are being conducted virtually.

As we continue to navigate our way ahead, I am pleased to report that the next set of armatures for A Soldier’s Journey arrived this week at Sabin Howard’s studio in Englewood, NJ.

Next armature panel

Sabin and Traci have rented a house in Englewood to keep the sculpting team close to the studio and ensure their safety.  They are continuing their work on the Memorial while closely following CDC guidelines.

construction panel

You can also follow construction progress at the Memorial in real time by visiting our website and scrolling down to the camera at the construction site.

We will keep you all closely informed as we forge ahead to raise the remaining funds that will make this Memorial a reality. As we move forward, please know how grateful we are for the advice and support you have each contributed to bring us to this point.

Stay safe and take care of each other.

Best,

Dans Signature

Daniel S. Dayton
Executive Director
U.S. World War One Centennial Commission


WWI DISPATCH February 2020

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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February 2020

Construction fence cover

Phase 1 construction work continues at the site of the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. The graphic construction fence covers, designed by Memorial architect Joseph Weishaar, have been installed, listing the key Memorial sponsors and organizations, along with information and photos. Passersby will be able to see through the panels to follow the ongoing construction work.

Our Forgotten Heroes:
Why don’t we talk about World War I?

“During the ‘Great War’, the United States of America lost over 116,000 of her troops in a span of only 19 months,” writes Jessica Manfre on the We Are the Mighty web site.  “It can be argued that without American’s force beside the allies, the war wouldn’t have ended in victory, but a stalemate. History has documented this impressive and vital piece of our story. So why don’t we talk about it and those incredible heroes that turned the tide for an entire world in the name of democracy?”  Click here to read the entire article about how “America failed its heroes by avoiding that chapter in its history.”


Foundations & Legacy:
General John J. Pershing

"The Loot"

To the fresh-faced and naive cadets at the University of Nebraska, he was “The Loot.” Some 25 years later, he was “The General” to battle-hardened officers of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) at the end of World War I.  Writing in The Officer Review magazine, Kevin Upton explores how John J. Pershing’s experiences on the university campus both shaped and presaged his success on the battlefield in World War I, and his enduring influence on military organizations a century later.  Click here to read the entire thoughtful article.


Lt. Col. Joseph H. Ward:
Doctor, surgeon, soldier

Joseph Ward

Leon Bates “came across Lt. Col. Joseph H. Ward’s name while doing research before returning to college, and came to appreciate his legacy while doing additional dissertation research.” Writing in American Legion magazine, Bates notes that while digging further, “I discovered he was a medical trailblazer and early American Legion member whose achievements – decades before the civil-rights movement – have been largely forgotten.” Click here to read the entire article, and find out how “this first-generation freedman became a successful physician, surgeon, entrepreneur, Army officer, hospital administrator, civic leader, and prominent member and commander of American Legion Post 107 in Indianapolis.”


The Legacy of the World War I: Ft. Des Moines Black Officers Training Camps

Ft. Des Moines grads

One of the most overlooked and neglected stories of African-Americans struggling for their inalienable rights was embodied by the 2,369 Black men who volunteered for training in the two Black Officers Training Camps at Ft. Des Moines, Iowa from June to November, 1917. Hal Chase, professor of African American studies at Des Moines Area Community College, takes up the story of how two of the 2,000 men who trained at Ft. Des Moines and “perceived themselves as the vanguard of their race that would forge a new future” went on to become leaders in the Civil Rights movement. Click here to read Chase’s entire article.


First Memorial to African-American Veterans of WWI Built in West Virginia

Kimball, West Virginia

When the United States entered World War 1, a platoon of 1,500 black soldiers from McDowell County, West Virginia  signed up for the fight.They served our country with distinction, and many were recognized with special honors for their service. A memorial dedicated specifically to the African-American soldiers of the First World War (the first memorial of its kind in the nation) opened in 1928 in Kimball, McDowell County.  Click here to learn more about how the memorial, like the soldiers who it was built to honor, was first a key part of the community, then neglected and forgotten, but now being restored again to its place and role of honor.


Innovative, team-taught class brings scale of World War I into focus through trip to European battlefields

Notre Dame class

More than 20 million people were killed and another 20 million or more were injured in World War I, but it’s difficult for Americans today to wrap their minds around just how catastrophic the conflict was. The last survivors have died, the war wasn’t fought on American soil, and it ended more than a century ago. But a group of Notre Dame students now has more than numbers, texts, or photos to help them understand the devastation. Click here to read more about how an interdisciplinary course combined “conventional battlefield analysis with the collective and individual things people did to understand and come to terms with the war.”


Alabama teen was American WWI hero

Homer Givens

Homer Givens was 19 years old when he received the title of “America’s first World War I hero,” as well as one of France’s highest honors, the Croix de Guerre. Givens, born in Florence, Ala., also received a Purple Heart and is now honored on the Walk of Honor at Florence, AL’s River Heritage Park. Click here to read more about how “the unassuming, bespectacled young man” became “an unlikely hero” for his actions during a bloody battle with German forces in 1917.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget Book Cover

“Lest We Forget: The Great War”

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library 

As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned―including posters from nations involved in the conflict―and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force. Proceeds from the sale of this book help fund the new National WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Time Lapse snip

You can keep track of progress at the new National World War I Memorial through construction site time lapse video, or a live video feed from the site. Click here to take a look, and also find out how you can help finish this national tribute to the 4.7 million Americans who served, and the 116,516 who did not come home from the World War I.


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John Brother Cade

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John Brother Cade

Submitted by: Johnette Brooks {GA WWI African American Historian}

John Brother Cade was born around 1894. John Brother Cade served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

2nd Lt. John Brother Cade, 1894 – 1970, Elberton, GA
Southern University Library Namesake
| Historian | Author | Educator

By Johnette Brooks

John Brother Cade (aka John B.) was born on 19 October 1894 in Elberton, GA. He was the second child of William Richard and Sara Francis (Bradford) Cade. His siblings are his elder brother Luther (also a WWI Private); William Jr.; Dora J.; Luthura and Leola. He attended St. Paul’s CME Church grade school. In 1915, he graduated from Knox Institute and Industrial School in Athens, GA. He was an early member of the C.M.E. or Colored Methodist Church.

Shortly after entering college, John became one of the first to volunteer for the new WWI Officers School in 1917. On 12 June, he was plowing his daddy’s field during the summer college break when he received the notice of his appointment shortly after 8AM. After refusing to pay double the bus fare to a negro man in Elberton with a car, he took the Greyhound bus and arrived too late to take the 3:40PM, non-stop train the Army provided to Iowa. So, he boarded the Dixie Flyer the next day and immediately saw faces he recognized. He first saw (future 1 Lt.) Pierce M. Thompson, the Albany Normal and Industrial School principal; then William Robinson, an Albany teacher; John J. James, a mail carrier from Thomasville.

Read John Brother Cade’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.



This email was sent to mkbarbour@gmail.com using GovDelivery Communications Cloud on behalf of: World War One Centennial Commission · 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW #123 · Washington, DC 20004

WWI DISPATCH December 2019

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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December 2019


National WWI Memorial Is Under Construction!

Construction Launch 2019

(December 12, 2019) Key leaders joined the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission on the site of the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC to mark the start of construction. (Left to right) National Park Service Acting Director David Vela; Commission Special Advisor Admiral Mike Mullen; Commission Chair Terry Hamby; Commission Special Advisor Senator John Warner; and U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt.

Construction Permit received for the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC; first phase work is now underway

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission has received a building permit from the National Park Service (NPS) for the first construction phase of the new National World War I Memorial on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC.

Key leaders gathered on the Memorial site on December 12 to mark the start of construction, including Commission Chair Terry Hamby, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, National Park Service Acting Director David Vela, Commission Special Advisors Senator John Warner and Admiral Mike Mullen, and others.

The first phase of construction will be a 360-day project to rebuild the former Pershing Park, and prepare the site for the eventual installation of the Memorial bronze sculpture when it is completed. The building permit was awarded after the Memorial design was approved by the Commission of Fine Arts and the National Capital Planning Commission earlier in 2019.

Click here to read more about the construction kickoff, and the road ahead to complete the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.


Honor the Doughboys with Year-End Gift

Come Along Wave

It’s been an an incredibly dynamic year for the Doughboys. In late August, sculptor Sabin Howard moves his studio from the Bronx to Englewood, NJ to accommodate the “full size” sculpting of the 58 foot long, 38 character bronze relief sculpture called “A Soldier’s Journey”. The final Memorial design is approved, and first phase construction has begun. It is your continued support that is making all this possible. So we ask you to please include the new World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. in your tax-deductible year-end giving. Click here to donate today!


Valor Medals project will advance in 2020

valor medal wave

The 2020 National Defense Authorization Act, signed on December 20, requires the service secretaries to re-examine the records of African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, Jewish American, and Native American veterans of World War I who earned medals for valor, and decide whether any of them should be upgraded to the nation’s highest military honor. The Valor Medals Review Task Force, a joint project by the World War I Centennial Commission and the George S. Robb Centre for the Study of the Great War at Park University in Parkville, Mo., has identified World War I service records that the service secretaries can use to determine whether they should be reviewed further to be considered for the Medal Of Honor. Click here to read more about this long-sought opportunity to be sure no Doughboy deserving the nation’s highest honor is left overlooked.


Spokane community unites to restore neglected World War I Memorial bridge

Spokane bridge WWI memorial

Spokane, WA Daughters of the American Revolution chapter member Rae Anna Victor was chatting with a local historian about the Argonne Bridge in the Millwood section, noting “how sad it was that the plaques had been taken off the Argonne Bridge because now hardly anyone knew the origins of the name. Both of us agreed that it needed to be rectified.” From this seed sprouted an amazing grass roots project that culminated in a new memorial dedicated on November 11, 2019. Click here to read more about this project “joining the past to the present, and moving on into the future” that has many lessons for other groups looking to rescue and restore local World War I memorials across the nation.


VFW Post 287 marks 100th Anniversary by honoring World War I namesake

Cpl Sahler

Pennsylvania historian Joseph Felice was driving along Main Street in Coatesville, PA earlier this year when he noticed banners lining the sidewalks, placed there by Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 287 in honor of Coatesville area men and women who served their country past and present. One banner in particular grabbed his attention: it read “Wellington G. Sahler, Killed in Action, 1918, Died in the Battle of Argonne Forrest.” Click here to read how Felice’s piqued interest resulted in a new understanding and appreciation of Sahlar, his friend Lance Eck, and the story of how and why VFW Post 287 got its name after World War I.


Greenwood, MS American Legion Post 29 named after three World War I heroes

American Legion Post 29 namesakes

American Legion Post 29 in Greenwood, Mississippi bears the name of three World War I veterans who all sacrificed their lives during the Great War. The three officers (one an aviator, two infantrymen) were killed in action in 1918 during the final month of combat in World War I, but thanks to the support of Greenwood’s American Legion Post 29, the stories of these three heroes will live on in perpetuity. Click here to read more about these three heroes: Lt. Samuel R. Keesler, Jr., Cpt. Henry W. Hamrick, and Lt. Gordon Gillespie.


How I Found Austin & How He Found Me

Austin in the Great War

For Robert Eugene Johnson, the author of Austin in the Great War, it started out as a beguilingly simple question about his father, Austin Johnson: “My family always longed to know what happened to Austin during the Great War. When I retired I resolved to find out.” That resolution led him on a remarkable journey that started with “only the barest facts about my father’s time “over there” and ended up with a book that shed light on both his father’s experience and the history of a half-forgotten component of the American Expeditionary Forces. Click here to read the whole story about the many “goosebumps” encountered in the journey to discover and tell the whole story about Austin in the Great War.


French village of Saint-Parize-le-Châtel commemorates WWI American presence

Hospital at Nevers

The small French village of Saint-Parize-le-Châtel (just south of the city of Nevers—former site of the Service of Supplies of the American Expeditionary Forces in WWI) still commemorates the American presence in their area where the huge Mars-sur-Allier Hospital Camp was located during 1917-1919. Click here to read a message from mayor, the head of the local historical society, and the designer of the historic route around the former U.S. Hospital, which tells of how citizens from the village continue to honor the American men and women who were killed during the First World War.


Doughboy MIA for December 2019

DOughboy MIA Generic image

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

This month Doughboy MIA would like to thank everyone for their contributions throughout 2019. It is through your generous donations that we are able to continue our work, and you will begin seeing more results of this work as 2020 progresses. We have several cases in the works and have made conclusions in several more more, and these will all be featured in coming editions of Doughboy MIA of the Month.

We took on a big job when we launched Doughboy MIA several years ago, and it has been a hard pull getting started, but we have made progress and that was only possible via YOUR donations and the hard work of our volunteer team.

Thanks! And blessings to you and yours this holiday season. 2020 promises to be a big year for us, and that means for you, too. Keep those donations coming and know we are ever grateful. The size doesn’t matter – the feeling behind it does. Together we will continue to try and make a full accounting of our missing Doughboys until a determination has been made for them all and any that might still be found are.

A man is only missing if he is forgotten – and together we’ll keep them from being forgotten.

A Happy New Year to you all.

Sincerely,

Rob Laplander and the whole Doughboy MIA team.

Would YOU like to be a part of our mission of discovering what happened to our missing Doughboys from WW1? Of course you would, and you CAN! Simply make a donation to the cause and know you played a part in making as full an accounting as possible of these men. Large or small doesn’t matter – that you cared enough to help does. Visit www.ww1cc.org/mia to make your tax deductible donation to our non-profit project today, and remember:

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Bundle

World War I Centennial Commemoration Collector’s Bundle $29.95

Collect all commemorative coins and lapel pins in one purchase!

  • Coins: Each piece is die-struck, bronze alloy, with nice gravity (unlike cheaper zinc coins)
  • Enamel inlay provides premium detailing and finish
  • Each coin and pin comes with its own commemorative packaging, adding value and gifting appeal.

This collection includes a WWI Centennial Coin, Centennial Lapel Pin, Bells of Peace Commemorative Coin, Bells of Peace Commemorative Lapel Pin, and U.S. Victory Lapel Pin. Originally sells for $34.35, now only $29.95.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Lilly Endowment donates $5 million to WWI Memorial

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission has announced a $5 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to the Doughboy Foundation in support of the campaign to build the first-ever National World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Lilly Endowment

One of Lilly Endowment’s founders, J.K. Lilly, Jr., served in World War I and rose to the rank of captain in the medical supply service of the American Expeditionary Forces.

Click here to read more about this wonderful donation to the National World War I Memorial.


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Charles Wilhelm Gärtner (Gardner)

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Charles Wilhelm Gärtner (Gardner)

Submitted by: Charles R. Gardner {Grandson}

Charles Wilhelm Gärtner born around 1892. Charles Gärtner served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

This is the Story about my grandfather, Charles Wilhelm Gärtner, his participation in WW1 and ends after the War with his marriage to my grandmother Anna K. Wolff. Charles Wilhelm Gärtner, participated in the “The Great War”.

Here is what I’ve discovered about him and that “War”.

This was his birth name and he does not change it until 1919. The World War started in July 28, 1914. The United States declared war on the Axis Powers later, in April 6, 1917. In June 5, 1917, Grandpa was working for the “Automatic” Sprinkler Corporation of America in New York City. They sent him to Atlanta, Georgia where he then lived. His job was “Sprinkler Engineer” and maybe the small factory manager. He worked in the Caudler Building (it was small building according to local historians), Atlanta Branch, in the city (Atlanta Georgia). He lived at the Atlanta YMCA. He was single, 25 years of age, of medium height, medium build, gray eyes, and black hair.

On June 5, 1917, he filled out a Draft Registration Card (#756). A year later (April 27, 1918) he was drafted in Atlanta, Georgia. He told his boss “Good bye” or maybe sent a letter to the New York City Headquarters to inform them and waits for his replacement to come. Once released from his job, bags packed, he walked to the Atlanta Recruiting Station and boards a bus for the 13-14 mile trip to Camp Gordon, named after the Confederate General John Brown Gordon. Camp Gordon, northeast from Atlanta, was the receiving station in this area (Georgia & Alabama) for Army induction. Today it’s the current site of the DeKalb-Peachtree Airport.

Read Charles Wilhelm Gärtner’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Honor our WWI Doughboys with a Year-End gift

An item from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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Honor our Doughboys with a Year-End Gift.

Doughboy Litter Bearers

2019 has been a BIG year for them.


Sculpture Scene 1 and 2

A Soldier’s Journey

In late August, sculptor Sabin Howard moves his studio from the Bronx to Englewood, NJ to accommodate the “full size” sculpting of the 58 foot long, 38 character bronze relief sculpture called “A Soldier’s Journey”.
At this new facility, Sabin and his entire studio team are doing amazing work.


At the site National WWI Memorial in Washington DC

Memorial Design Approved

In a major project milestone, the final Memorial design is unanimously approved by the US Commission of Fine arts (CFA) after a presentation on Sept. 18, 2019. The National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) also approved the final design in early October, clearing the way for the project to seek construction permits from the Department of the Interior and the supervising National Park Service.


Construction Launch 2019

Construction of the WWI Memorial Launches

December 12, 2019, tops off an incredibly dynamic year for the Doughboys. This marks the launch of the first phase of construction for their new memorial in Washington, D.C. after more than 100 years!


It is your continued support that is making all this possible.

So we ask you to please include the WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C. in your tax deductible year-end giving.

Click HERE to donate today


Even if you can’t donate now
You can still help!

Here is how:

We have published the 2019 WWI Memorial progress into a Facebook Story with videos and image galleries. If you have a facebook account, please help us raise money by sharing our post with your friends on your Facebook Page.

facebook page

Using you smart phone, go to 
https://www.facebook.com/pg/ww1centennial/posts/

The story is pinned to the top of the posts.

Click the share button and spread the word about the progress on the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Happy Holidays, Happy New Year and thank you for your support.

Peter Jackson WWI Documentary back in Theaters for Holidays

Don’t forget…


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Find Showtimes / Theaters >

TSNGO Dec. 2019 poster

See it at size and even in 3D


Peter Jackson intended audiences to see this masterpiece reconstruction of WWI footage at full theatrical size and in 3D. And you have three chances to do that.
This Saturday, Dec. 7th or on Tuesday & Wednesday Dec.17 & 18th.
This cinematic experience is something you will likely never forget. The limited engagement may sell out so don’t delay. Reserve your tickets today!

Find Showtimes / Theaters >


And Please Honor our American Doughboys This Holiday Season as Well.

We have made so much progress in these past months… The Memorial has received final design approval from the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) and the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC). Sabin Howard is making tremendous headway with the Sculpture “A Soldier’s Journey”.
We are ready to get our Construction Permits which authorize us to begin the PHASE 1 PARK RECONSTRUCTION, preparing Pershing Park as the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C.
Now is the time we need your support and contributions more than ever! Please remember the Doughboys and all those who served in WWI in your Holiday and Year-End giving. “They Gave the Best Part of their Youth” for us. Let’s remember them this season!

Donate to the Memorial > 

Donate nighttime image giving Tuesday

Peter Jackson WWI Documentary back in Theaters for Holidays

This news may be of interest to our members and followers.


Doughboy Foundation Horizontal png
Five start 260

Find Showtimes / Theaters >

TSNGO Dec. 2019 poster

See it at size and even in 3D


Peter Jackson intended audiences to see this masterpiece reconstruction of WWI footage at full theatrical size and in 3D. And you have three chances to do that.

This Saturday, Dec. 7th or on Tuesday & Wednesday Dec.17 & 18th.

This cinematic experience is something you will likely never forget. The limited engagement may sell out so don’t delay. Reserve your tickets today!

Find Showtimes / Theaters >


And Please Honor our American Doughboys This Holiday Season as Well.

We have made so much progress in these past months… The Memorial has received final design approval from the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) and the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC). Sabin Howard is making tremendous headway with the Sculpture “A Soldier’s Journey”.

We are ready to get our Construction Permits which authorize us to begin the PHASE 1 PARK RECONSTRUCTION, preparing Pershing Park as the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Now is the time we need your support and contributions more than ever! Please remember the Doughboys and all those who served in WWI in your Holiday and Year-End giving. “They Gave the Best Part of their Youth” for us. Let’s remember them this season!

Donate to the Memorial > 

Donate nighttime image giving Tuesday