Tag Archives: World War One Centennial Commission

Peter Jackson WWI Documentary back in Theaters for Holidays

This news may be of interest to our members and followers.


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Find Showtimes / Theaters >

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See it at size and even in 3D


Peter Jackson intended audiences to see this masterpiece reconstruction of WWI footage at full theatrical size and in 3D. And you have three chances to do that.

This Saturday, Dec. 7th or on Tuesday & Wednesday Dec.17 & 18th.

This cinematic experience is something you will likely never forget. The limited engagement may sell out so don’t delay. Reserve your tickets today!

Find Showtimes / Theaters >


And Please Honor our American Doughboys This Holiday Season as Well.

We have made so much progress in these past months… The Memorial has received final design approval from the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) and the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC). Sabin Howard is making tremendous headway with the Sculpture “A Soldier’s Journey”.

We are ready to get our Construction Permits which authorize us to begin the PHASE 1 PARK RECONSTRUCTION, preparing Pershing Park as the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Now is the time we need your support and contributions more than ever! Please remember the Doughboys and all those who served in WWI in your Holiday and Year-End giving. “They Gave the Best Part of their Youth” for us. Let’s remember them this season!

Donate to the Memorial > 

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WWI DISPATCH November 2019

An item from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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November 2019

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A Soldier’s Journey – Sabin Howard’s National World War One Memorial

MutualArt photo

MutualArt magazine chose the week of Veteran’s Day 2019 to examine the process of creating A Soldier’s Journey, the sculpture in the newly-approved National World World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. The in-depth article on sculptor Sabin Howard  portrays him working in his”austere New Jersey industrial warehouse studio” to complete “the final modelling stage of A Soldier’s Journey” before the sculpture can be cast.  Click here to read the entire interview.


They Shall Not Grow Old returns to theaters in December for limited run

They Shall Not Grow Old 2019

Back by Popular Demand, Academy Award-winner Peter Jackson’s masterpiece WWI documentary appears again in theaters near you this Holiday Season, featuring never seen before World War I soldiers and events colorized and in 3D. The December 2019 screenings include an exclusive introduction from Jackson, and interview with him at the close. “They Shall Not Grow Old” will be seen December 7, 17 & 18 onlyClick here to find the theater nearest to you, and to order your tickets now.


Frank Havlik: Doing what’s right

Frank Havlik

Corporal Frank Steven Havlik, E Co, 355 Infantry, 89th Division, stood in the burning church in France in 1918 and had to make a quick decision about what he should try to save from the inferno rapidly consuming the building. Havlik and his buddy grabbed the priest’s golden robe, a chasuble, and each took half away with him as the they left the burning church. Havlik always intended to return the chasuble to its proper owner, and his intention was finally carried out by his family nearly a century later. Click here to read the entire story of how a Doughboy’s determination to “do what’s right” finally brought the precious artifact home.


A Memoir of the War: A Doughboy’s Journey Through France and Germany in World War I

A Memoir of the War

“Writing the memoirs of his participation in the American Expeditionary Forces twelve years after the end of the First World War, my father proudly declared that the time he was in uniform was ‘the greatest experience of my life.’ Reading them, one can sense that he relished every minute of it, including terrifying moments in combat or coping with mind-numbing mud whether in the trenches or on his never-ending marches. But he never lost his sense of humor.” So writes Charles L. Daris of his father Louis Z. Daris’ WWI memoirs, which he helped edit and publish.  The remarkable two-volume set provides a unique perspective on World War I, by an American soldier who recorded in remarkable detail what he saw in the Great War. Click here to read the entire article by Charles Davis, and find out how you can get copies of his father’s wartime journals.


Bells of Peace 2019: Thanks to all who participated across the nation

Bells of Peace 2019

Bells of Peace is a National Bell Tolling that was launched in 2018 as a part of the Centennial of the WWI Armistice, when fighting on the Western Front stopped.

As a part of the program, and to support small groups for participation, we created a Bells of Peace Participation App. This Smartphone App earned over 22,500 installs in 2018 and so we release an update for 2019.

Although for 2019 we had to let go of several features of the 2018 application (including social sharing), we did get an update published. For 2018, the App was launched on over 3,500 smart phones for Veterans Day.

For 2020, we hope to expand Bells of Peace and produce a more complete update of the App. This is in anticipation that, for next year’s Armistice anniversary,  actual construction on the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC will be well underway.

Regarding the Participation App, one of the major improvements we want to implement for 2020 is the user’s ability to test their phone and the tolling. In this way users can be sure that they will get the result they planned at 11 a.m. on November 11th, 2020.

Keep reading the World War I Dispatch newsletter for more information on the 2020 Bells of Peace Participation App.


Teaching World War I history after the Centennial is over: a teacher’s thoughts

Paul Larue

This Veterans Day marked one hundred and one years since Armistice was declared. The World War I Centennial is winding down. What is the state of World War I education in classrooms across the country? Paul LaRue was a classroom teacher for thirty years in a rural, high-poverty school district in southern Ohio, and also served on the Ohio World War I Centennial Committee, working primarily on education. Paul has some comments and opinions on the state of World War I education in the aftermath of the Centennial. Hint: he gives it pretty good grades.


“The Lafayette Escadrille” movie has World Premiere at the National Museum of the United States Air Force

Lafayetet Escadrille movie poster

The Air Force Museum Foundation Living History Series presented the World Premiere of the film “The Lafayette Escadrille” on Saturday, November 9, in the Air Force Museum Theater. “The Lafayette Escadrille” is the first comprehensive documentary film made about the American volunteers who flew for France before the United States entered World War I. The movie is officially endorsed by the United States World War I Centennial Commission. “The Lafayette Escadrille” follows the path of the young Americans who came to the aid of America’s oldest ally—standing up for the values of freedom and liberty shared by the sister republics. Click here to read more about the movie that is “the only American story that covers the entire duration of the war, from one end of the Western Front to the other.”


“Known But To God”: The Unknown Soldier and the U.S.S. Olympia

Erskine

Sentinels at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier recently received new SIG Sauer U.S. M17 pistols inlaid with wood from the U.S.S. Olympia. It was selected because she was the honored ship that transported the remains of the World War I Unknown Soldier home from Europe. Today, three American soldiers are interred at the Tomb, one each from World War I, World War II, and Korea. (A fourth unknown from the battlefields of Vietnam was later identified and returned to his family). Aboard the U.S.S. Olympia, a young U.S. Marine Corps captain led the Honor Guard that accompanied the remains of Unknown Soldier back home in 1921—the year the Tomb was dedicated. His name was Graves Erskine. Click here to read the entire story of how the Tomb of the Unknown and Erskine were linked over the next fifty years and three wars.


Postal Service stamp remembers U.S. “Turning the Tide” in World War I

US Postage Stamp

Lisa Y. Greenwade, in the Stamp Development department of the U.S. Postal Service, writes to remind stamp collectors that the World War I: Turning the Tide Forever® stamps are still available from the USPS. The stamps commemorate the nearly five million Americans, mostly men, joined the military, and about a million women entered the workforce to make up for the shortage of civilian labor. In spring 1918, U.S. forces played vital roles in the St. Mihiel battle and the Meuse-Argonne offensive, which helped bring an end to the war. Click here to read more about the development of the postage stamp, and how to get it from the U.S. Postal Service.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News. The Doughboy Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube.

Weekly episodes completed.
Podcast will Publish SPECIALS
as occasions arise.

The Doughboy Podcast had quite a run! It all started as a weekly conference call between and among those who were focusing on the Centennial of WWI.

In 2017, as the centennial of America’s Entry into WWI was imminent, we decided to turn our conference call into a public-facing podcast.

For the next 148 weeks — nearly three years — we delivered a series of shows that included the story of WWI from 100 years ago, and stories about those who were commemorating WWI today.

In that time, over 2.17 million show copies were downloaded by an audience which grew to over 100,000 downloads a month.

The Podcast was privileged to interview the smartest, the brightest and best experts and enthusiasts on the subject of WWI. We explored the story of WWI from many perspectives, inviting historians, authors, curators, veterans, musicians, film makers, game developers, orchestra conductors, educators, politicians, and many others.

Most of all we need to say THANK YOU to everyone who tuned in. And you still can! Much of what was captured remains a great listen anytime.

And as we publish new SPECIALS, we will be sure to reach out to everyone who subscribed to the mailing list. SIGN UP HERE.


Doughboy MIA for November 2019

Franklin Ellenberger

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Our Doughboy MIA this month is PVT Franklin Ellenberger – and has a special story!

Born on 12 July, 1892, Frank Ellenberger was from Wilmington, Ohio and was drafted into the army on 27 May, 1918. Sent to Camp Beauregard at Alexandria, Louisiana he was assigned training with the 41st Company, 159th Depot Brigade for indoctrination before being sent to Company I, 153rd Infantry Regiment, 39th ‘Delta’ Division. The 39th left for France on 6 August, 1918 and once Over There was re-designated as the 5th Depot Division (replacement division). From there, Ellenberger was sent to Company K, 128th Infantry, 32nd ‘Red Arrow’ Division in September, 1918. When the 32nd went forward to relieve the 91st Division during the Meuse-Argonne campaign on 4 October, 1918 PVT Ellenberger was among them. The 32nd would be the first division to crack the Kriemhilde Stellung six days later, on 10 October, 1918, but by that time Ellenberger was already dead. A statement by his sergeant says he “saw Private Ellenberger killed instantly by fragments from a high explosive shell. Hit in the head… on October 7th, 1918 while in action near Epinonville.”

At the time Ellenberger’s battalion (the 3rd) was supporting attacks made by the 125th Infantry south of Romagne sous Montfaucon who would, within a few days, capture the ground that the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery occupies today.

Laura Ellenberger

No record of his burial ever made it back to the Graves Registration Service however, and while two separate searches were made for him following the war, nothing further was ever found concerning his case and it was closed in December, 1919. His mother, Laura Ellenberger (right) made the Gold Star Mother’s Pilgrimage to see her sons name on the Tablet of the Missing at the Meuse-Argonne Cemetery in 1931.

Jeremy Wayne Bowles

Then, on the evening of 4 November, 2019, our Assistant Field Manager here at Doughboy MIA, Mr Jeremy Wayne Bowles (at left, commonly known as ‘The Dayton Doughboy’) was doing some research into Ohio soldiers that served in the war with his family’s help when his mother happened to notice a name that rang a bell with her… Ellenberger. Later that night, just on a hunch, she pulled out the family tree to check that name and found an entry for a Private Franklin Ellenberger KIA in the war, who had been her great grandmothers brother. Jeremy checked the ABMC website to find out if this relative of his – whom he had not known about before – was buried in France or had come home and found he was MIA!

Infer what you want about this story, but it certainly would seem some sort of intervention was at work here for a worker with Doughboy MIA to discover through accident and hunch that HE was related to an MIA from that war – another example that a man is only missing if he is forgotten!

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Coin Set box

2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar Set

No longer available from the U.S. Mint!

These Official World War I Centennial Silver Dollar Sets are still available here on the WWI Centennial Commission’s online gift shop.

NOTE: Each set comes with 2 separate coins. Each set will accompany the Official Doughboy Design alongside your choice of Military Branch.

“The United Mint certifies that this coin is a genuine 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar, minted and issued in accordance with legislation passed by Congress and signed by the President on December 16, 2014, as Public Law 113-212. This coin was minted by the Department of the Treasury, United States Mint, to commemorate the centennial of America’s involvement in World War I. This coin is legal tender of the United States.”

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.



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Abraham Wolfe

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Abraham Wolfe

Submitted by: David Andrew Masiero, CDR USCG, Ret. {Abraham was my 1974 Restaurant Boss}

Abraham Wolfe was born around 1895. Abraham Wolfe served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Abraham Wolfe was my boss at his Lenox, MA steak house when I worked there at age 16. My understanding is he and his older brother Manny had a steak house in Manhattan and at some point Abe decided to have a steak house on his own in Lenox, Massachusetts in Berkshire County.

I lived in the next town Lee, MA. I was inquisitive and asked questions when my waitress mother told me he was a WW1 vet.

Both my Italian grandfathers (born 1895 & 1899) came to USA from villages Pavone (LOM) & Trissino (VZ) in 1922 & 1923 as laborers (Frank at Lee, MA Lime/Marble quarry pits & Andrew at Brooklyn Navy Yard on drydock shoring team). They both were in the ITA combat infantry vs. AUS/HUN. Nono Frank “Chesko” Baccoli lost complete use of one eye so WW1 always interested me. They died in 63 & 65 (me born 1958) when I was too young so I was never able to discuss WW1 with them.

My deceased (2014) father Val Masiero was a 1951-1955 (E5) Navy Construction Electrician Seabee and he told me his father Andrew would NEVER talk about the Great War. It was something NOT discussed.

Back to Abe, …. I am Catholic and Abe Wolfe told me that as a Jew there was great discrimination at Army National Guard boot camp & on the way over on the troop ship. He was in the NY National Guard (part of AEF) and deployed to France.

Read Abraham Wolfe’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Veterans Day / Armistice Day Commemoration Resources

As many jurisdictions have Remembrance Day/Veterans Day as a holiday, these materials may be of use to some teachers out there today.


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Remember our WWI Veterans by donating to their Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Donate >

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Armistice Day / Veterans Day Resources


Bells of Peace Logo 2019

in 2018, we launched “Bells of Peace” as a WWI Remembrance on the centennial of the Armistice of World War I. Tens of thousands of communities, churches, organizations and individuals came together for a moment of reflection to honor the people, events, sacrifices and consequences of the “War that Changed the World”.

It is a means of showing respect and reverence to the horrific, the heroic, and the consequential. In order that these events do not fade back into the mists of obscurity, we are once again calling for a National Bell Tolling on the 11th hour (local), of the 11th day of the 11th month.

Join us as we stop, and take a moment to reflect, remember and honor… as we reverently toll bells 21 times, 5 seconds apart in hope for continued peace.

Bells of Peace App 2019 - toll

No Bell? No Problem!
We have an App for that.

2019 “Bells of Peace”
Participation App Features:

  • For iOS & Android mobile devices.
  • Countdown timer to 11am local 11/11/19
  • Easy to share with friends.
  • Bells will toll together across devices.
  • Select from 7 bells sounds.
  • Auto OR Manual tolling mode.

And more…

Get The Participation App >


Multi-Denominational Sacred Service

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World War I Armistice Day Commemorative Sacred Service

If you play this podcast on 11/11 starting at 10:03:30 am local, the Bells of Peace will toll at 11am exactly.

This special 90 minute podcast is available on your Smartphone or on the web. It brings you the sound of the World War I Armistice Day Commemorative Sacred Service, a multi-denominational service honoring the Centennial of the WWI Armistice, from the WWI Centennial Commission in partnership with Washington National Cathedral.

Listen to the Sacred Service >

Download the Service’s Program:

Download this beautiful 36-page program from the Sacred Service. This is a wonderful remembrance and a keepsake in its own right.

Download the Service’s Program >


A Great WWI Story to listen to together.

This iconic WWI picture shows SGT Roy C. Holtz, of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin and he is riding through a European city on a Harley Davidson!

Yes – A WWI era Harley — Also iconic and also from Wisconsin!

Actually, the picture and caption aren’t quite accurate… that’s Belgium he is riding through; it’s not Germany —  But the story is true, real and more amazing than the simple assumption.

Our good friend, citizen historian and author Rob Laplander wrote a researched account of this story… what “actually” happened –  intended for high school students.  Rob generously has given us permission to produce the story for you as a Podcast… and we have the whole 40-minute story for you here today. It is fun, interesting, family friendly and a great listen by yourself, or with any group. It is an ideal Veterans Day activity. Please enjoy.

smartphone roy holtz

“First into Germany”:
SGT Roy Holtz – And he did it on a Harley
By author Robert Laplander

Easy to access and play from your Smartphone or the website.

Listen to the Story >


National WWI Memorial View

Honor and Remember All Those Who Served in WWI For Generations to Come!

As you remember all veterans and their service on Veterans Day 2019, please help us honor our WWI Doughboys, Hello Girls, Devil Dogs, Hellfighters, Air Corps, Navy, Coast Guard, Nurses, Donut Girls, and everyone in our nation that rallied to the cause for world freedom and Democracy a century ago. It was no less than the birth of our nation on the world stage.

Step up and help build this memorial in our nation’s capital to honor America’s epic, historical, and previously unprecedented commitment to the values that define us.

We cannot let this story, sacrifice and lesson fall back into obscurity. Your participation will help it stand for generations to come. Please donate on this special day!

Donate Today

SPECIAL: A WWI Commemorative Sacred Service

A note for those who are not able to attend a service tomorrow, but would still like undertake an act of remembrance.


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World War I
Commemorative Sacred Service

Episode #148

WWI Armistice Day Commemorative Sacred Service 2019

SPECIAL: World War I
Commemorative Sacred Service

If you play this episode on 11/11 starting at 10:03:30 am local, the Bells of Peace will toll at 11am exactly.

Host: Theo Mayer

This special episode brings you the sound of the World War I Armistice Day Commemorative Sacred Service, a multi-denominational service honoring the Centennial of the WWI Armistice, from the WWI Centennial Commission in partnership with Washington National Cathedral.

Download the Service program (a keepsake in its own right):
https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/images/2018-ace/pdf/wwi_armistice_sacred-service_program_11_11_2018.pdf

Link to Listen to the Sacred Service 

All about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


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PODCAST – First Into Germany: And he did it on a Harley!

A new podcast from World War One Centennial Commission.


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First Into German:
And he did it on a
Harley!

Episode #147

Iconic picture of Sgt. Roy Holtz riding on his Harley 11/12/18 – but this is actually not a Sgt. yet, only a Cpl. AND he is not in Germany here, though he WAS the first man into Germany. What? Here is the whole story!

SPECIAL: First Man into Germany

SPECIAL: 

Hear the full unabridged story of
“First into Germany: SGT Roy Holtz – And he did it on a Harley”
By author Robert Laplander
Read by Host, Theo Mayer

Introduction | 01:55

  • Part 1: Yup, That’s Me! | 03:10
  • Part 2: It’s Off to War… | 08:25
  • Part 3: Rolling With the Red Arrow! | 14:25
  • Part 4: Oh… You’ve GOT to be kidding!? | 20:05
  • Part 5: The Real Story Behind the Picture. | 27:10
  • Epilog | 32:50

Listen To The Podcast NOW

All about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


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WWI DISPATCH October 2019

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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October 2019

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The Doughboy Foundation Releases Free Updated “Bells of Peace” App for Commemorating Veterans Day 2019

The Doughboy Foundation, in cooperation with The Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier , has released an updated version of the “Bells of Peace” phone app for commemorating Veterans Day 2019. The updated Bells of Peace app, which is now available on both the Apple App Store and Google Play, assists American citizens and organizations across the nation to toll bells in their communities twenty-one times on Monday, November 11, 2019 at 11:00 a.m. local time. The nationwide bell tolling will honor those American men and women who served one hundred years ago during World War I, as well as saluting all Americans veterans who have served their nation at home and abroad in both war and peace. Click here to find about more about the 2019 Bells of Peace campaign, and learn how individuals and organizations may participate on Veterans Day.


National Civic Art Society hosts Sculptor Sabin Howard presenting design for the National World War I Memorial Nov. 15

Sabin Howard

The National Civic Art Society presents a talk by sculptor Sabin Howard on Friday November 15 at the Cosmos Club in Washington, D.C., 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. EST. Howard will present his magnificent classical design for the National World War I Memorial, which recently received final approval from the required government authorities. The Memorial is to be located in Pershing Park in Washington. Click here to read more about the event, and how to obtain tickets.


Veterans Day Weekend Events at the National WWI Museum and Memorial Friday-Monday, Nov. 8-11 to Honor Those Who Serve

NWWIM&M

As the commemoration of the centennial of World War I (2014-19) continues, the National WWI Museum and Memorial serves as a fitting place to honor those who have served — and continue to serve — our country. To recognize these men and women, admission to the Museum and Memorial is free for veterans and active duty military personnel, while general admission for the public is half-price, throughout the Veterans Day weekend (Friday to Monday, Nov. 8 to 11, 2019). To observe Veterans Day, the Museum and Memorial will offer a wide variety of events November 8 to 11 for people of all ages.  Click here to find out more about the Veterans Day weekend activities at the National WWI Museum and Memorial.


Peter Jackson’s WWI Documentary ‘They Shall Not Grow Old’ returns to theaters in December 2019 in both 3D and 2D

They Shall Not Grow Old

By popular demand, Fathom Events and Warner Brothers will bring director Peter Jackson’s remarkable World War I documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old” back to movie theaters nationwide for three days only this December, offering audiences another chance to see it on the big screen and in 3D. One of the most acclaimed and highest-grossing documentaries ever made, “They Shall Not Grow Old” is director Peter Jackson’s extraordinary look at the soldiers, the events, the sounds and the sights of World War I. The film will also be available in 2D in select locations. Click here to find out more about, and where you can get tickets for, this encore presentation of “They Shall Not Grow Old” in December.


Tribute Ceremony at Nov. 6 at Women’s Overseas Service League Flagstaff and Grove in Central Park Honors Women Serving America in WWI & Beyond

Hello Girls snip

East Side World War I Centennial Commemoration, American Red Cross, and the NYC Department of Veterans’ Services are holding a Tribute Ceremony to the Women Who Have Served America, Wednesday, November 6, 2019, 11:00-12 noon at the newly rediscovered Overseas Service League Flagstaff and Grove, Central Park at 69th Street Walk. In 1925 a Central Park memorial grove of 24 trees and flagstaff were conceptualized for a tribute to American women who died overseas in World War One. Today the living memorial of thriving trees spans the wall along Fifth Avenue from 69th to 71st Streets. Click here to find out more about the newly-rediscovered memorial, and how to attend the ceremony on November 6.


Ahead of Veterans Day, National Museum of African American History and Culture To Host Book Discussion on African Americans’ Central Role in WWI

We Return Fighting

To celebrate veterans and commemorate the centennial of WWI, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture will host a book talk on the museum’s latest publication, We Return Fighting: World War I and the Shaping of Modern Black Identity, on Thursday, November 7, 7p.m., at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, 1400 Constitution Ave. N.W., Washington, DC. The book talk will feature Kinshasha Holman-Conwill, deputy director, NMAAHC, Greg Carr, chair of the Department of Afro-American Studies, Howard University; and Krewasky A. Salter, Col., USA, Ret., guest curator, and executive director of the First Division Museum. Click here to learn more about the book, the event, and find out how to attend the book discussion on November 7.


Annual Flanders Remembers Concert November 6 in New York City

Flanders logo

On the occasion of Veterans Day 2019, Mr. Yves Wantens, General Delegate of the Government of Flanders to the USA, kindly invites you to the Annual Flanders Remembers Concert on November 6, 7pm. Enjoy Shelter by Revue Blanche, and featuring readings from War and Turpentine by award-winning author Stefan Hertmans. Click here to read more about the event, and learn how to RSVP to attend.


The Ghost Fleet: How Skeletons Of WWI Ships Came To Rest In The Potomac

Mallows Bay Ghost Ships

If you look at a satellite image of the Potomac River, about 30 miles south of Washington you’ll see a curve in the river, packed with dozens of identical oblong shapes. At low tide, they emerge eerily from the water — a “ghost fleet” of wooden steamships dating back to World War I. It’s called Mallows Bay, and it’s one of the largest collections of shipwrecks in the world. The story of how these ships ended up in the Potomac is a tale of environmental destruction — and rebirth. The shipwrecks have recently received federal protection, as part of a new national marine sanctuary. Click here to read how WAMU’s Jacob Fenston and Tyrone Turner visited Mallows Bay, by canoe and kayak, to document the unusual waterscape the shipwrecks have created.


Special Exhibition “Etched in Memory” at National WWI Museum and Memorial

Etched in Memory

Etched in Memory, the latest special exhibition at the National WWI Museum and Memorial, features color etchings by British artist James Alphege Brewer published throughout the Great War as a reminder of the cultural losses it inflicted. Brewer’s series of etchings were influential; some were copied and distributed widely in the United States and could be found hung on parlor walls in solidarity with the Allied cause. Click here to read more about this special exhibition exploring these graphic renderings of the many cultural landmarks that were physically damaged or destroyed in World War I, but remained etched in the memories of artists like Brewer.


Friends and family pay their respects to World War I veteran in Philadelphia, PA

Thomas Fearn ceremony

A memorial service was held recently to honor Sgt. Thomas Fearn, a soldier who was killed in action in WWI. His body laid in an unmarked grave until his relatives were able to locate the grave this year and place a marker. By the time they gathered at the Old Cathedral Cemetery, Thomas Joseph Fearn Jr. had been dead for more than a century, but for his descendants, it’s never too late to pay your respects. Click here to read more about the effort to locate, identify, and honor the remains of the 26-year-old Philadelphian sergeant who perished in the Meuse Argonne Offensive in September 1918.


First Lieutenant Vivian Roberts: The GA National Guard’s only POW in WWI

Vivian Roberts

The United States observes National Prisoner of War / Missing in Action Recognition Day on the third Friday in September. This day allows a moment of pause to remember those who have been held as prisoners of war during our nation’s conflicts and those listed as missing in action. One hundred years ago, the only Georgia Guardsmen held as a POW during World War I began his long journey home to Macon, Ga. from a prison hospital in Germany. Click here to read more about the perilous journey and eventual homecoming of the Jackson, GA native who served in every enlisted rank in the Georgia National Guard before accepting a commission as a second lieutenant.


WWI quilt made in 1918 connects Eastern Shore of Virginia to England

Pungoteague Quilt

A quilt made during World War I for an American Red Cross chapter on Virginia’s Eastern Shore was found recently, tucked away in storage in a British museum. The quilt was made to be sent to a wartime hospital in Europe. The Pungoteague Quilt, designed and stitched by Mrs. S.K. Martin of Harborton in 1918, bears the names of nearly 700 people who made donations — many of whom still have descendants living on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Click here to learn more about the quilt, the man who found it in Great Britain, and how he trying to find out more about the people whose names are on the historic textile from Virginia.


African American WWI veteran finally receives permanent headstone

Leonard W Inman

A black soldier who was buried in an unmarked Indiana grave is getting proper recognition for his military service in World War I nearly a half-century after his death. The memorial for Leonard Inman, who died in 1973, took place at Spring Vale Cemetery in Lafayette, IN in September with a 21-gun salute, the retiring of colors and taps by the American Legion Post 492, and a new, permanent headstone. Click here to learn how the president of the General de Lafayette Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution led the effort to obtain a headstone for Inman.


Other World War I Stories this Month

Find many more World War I stories on the “World War I Centennial News” page.


The Doughboy Podcast

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WW1 Centennial News: The Doughboy Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this month, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our website,  iTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube.

John Morrow Sepia

Episode #142
Lifetime Achievement: Dr. John Morrow

Posts raising money for Nat. WWI Memorial – Derek Sansone & David Hamon  | @ 02:10

100 Years ago – Host | @ 08:55

Born in the Month of September – David Kramer | @ 16:30

Lifetime Achievement in Military Writing – Dr. John Morrow | @ 22:50

The Buzz: Selected Posts from the Internet – Host | @ 37:15

Memorial Sketch to reality podcast

Episode #143
The New WWI Memorial

Announcement: Bells of Peace 2019 | @ 01:10

NCPC Design approval | @ 03:35
Why we MUST build this – Terry Hamby | @ 06:20

If not YOU then WHO? – Edwin Fountain | @ 08:25
Why a Nat. Memorial in KC and DC? – Dr. Mathew Naylor | @ 11:50

The Memorial in the Park – Edwin Fountain | @ 14:30

The International Design Competition – Host | @ 16:40

“And the Winner is:” – Joe Weishaar & Sabin Howard | @ 18:00

Interpretation & Education – Dr. Libby O’Connell | @ 24:20

“A Soldier’s Journey” – Sabin Howard | @ 28:35

Where Tradition and the Future Meet – Sabin Howard | @ 33:45

Dizzying Parallel Tracks | @ 42:10

“And the Bronze Metal goes to…” – Steve Maule | @ 44:20

Final Design – APPROVED – various | @ 51:10

The First Mile and the Last Mile: Fundraising – Edwin Fountain | @ 53:30

Tens of thousands of German soldiers surrender in October of 1918

Episode #144
October 1918 & The Lost Battalion

October 1918 Overview Roundtable – Dr.Edward Legel & Katherine Akey | @02:15

Historians Corner: Lost Battalion – Ron Laplander | @18:25

Shifting sands and hard fighting – Mike Shuste | @25:10

Remembering Veterans: Story of John Foster – Mark Foster | @29:40

US Army CMH WWI Website – Dr. Erik Villard | @35:00

Spotlight On The Media 1: Dr. Edward Lengel | @40:15

Spotlight On The Media 2: Lost Battalion Documentary – Mark Fastoso & John King | @42:50

Wilson throws baseball

Episode #145
Overtures to Peace & Baseball

Overtures to peace – Host | @01:30

Atrocities in Syria – Mike Shuster | @08:20

America Emerges: Sgt. Alvin York – Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:00

Remembering Veterans: Charles Edward Dilkes – Dr. Virginia Dilkes | @20:45

Speaking WWI: Teddy Bear Suit – Host | @28:05

Historian’s Corner: Baseball in WWI – Jim Leeke | @31:20

100C/100M: Springdale PA – Mayor Jo Bertoline & Patrick Murray | @37:50

Kodak VPK Camera

Episode 146
WWl Through Many Lenses

Bells of Peace 2019 – Host | @02:05

The Cultural Impact of WWI – Dr. Jay Winter | @05:05

Japan’s Impact on WWI – Dr. Frederick Dickenson | @11:55

The Impact of WWI on the World – Sir Hugh Strachan | @19:50

Speaking WWI: Tank – Host | @27:15

WWI War Tech: Many lenses looking – Host | @28:55

They Shall Not Grow Old: A vision realized – Brent Burge | @33:10


Doughboy MIA for October 2019

Essel M Maxwell

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday’s MIA this month is PFC Essel M. Maxwell. Born in Washington D.C. on April 5th, 1891, Essel Monshuer Maxwell was a tall, thin 26 year old when he signed his draft card on May 25th, 1917 at Painesville, Ohio. He had attended the technical high school in Washington but one year before going to work as a marine fireman on the Great Lakes before the war. An injury while on that job had led to a trepanning being done on the back of his head, where a silver half dollar was inserted (which would later figure into his story). He was also a convicted felon, serving time in the Lake County Prison at Painesville, Ohio when he signed his draft card (in advance of the national draft day of June 5th), though the nature of his crime remains currently unknown. Despite his felony, Maxwell was inducted in the army on August 15th, 1917 – indeed he may have asked to be allowed to go into the army – and sent to Camp Meade in Maryland that November, ostensibly when his legal situation could be resolved with the federal government. At Meade he was assigned duty with Company F, 313th Infantry Regiment, of the 79th Division. He was promoted to Private First Class on January 1st, 1918 and on March 29th, 1918 was transferred to Company A, 111th Infantry Regiment, 28th Division; a regiment with roots extending back to the American Revolution. With them Maxwell departed for overseas service on May 5th, 1918 aboard the S.S. Olympic.

On July 1st, 1918 PFC Maxwell and Company A were heavily engaged with the enemy outside Chateau Thierry at Hill 204, near the Marne River. A skilled and dependable grenadier, Maxwell and his corporal managed to clear a strong enemy machine gun emplacement that afternoon, killing or wounding all of the enemy serving the weapon and destroying the piece. (For this action he would later be awarded the French Croix de Guerre.) Some time following this action, however, PFC Maxwell was killed; the official cause listed as being by a machine gun bullet, but almost immediately there were problems with the case. An initial search by Graves Registration personnel soon after the war apparently failed to turn up a set of remains, although there is a hand written notation in his burial files that he was buried in Temporary Cemetery #754. However, that is all that was apparently known; no specific grave is noted and there is no original burial slip on file. His mother was notified of his death on July 27th, 1918.

Inquiries among his comrades were begun and on January 29th, 1918 PVT William Williamson of Company A stated,

“Private Maxwell was killed by a hand grenade on Hill 204 near Chateau Thierry. He was buried, but I am not sure where… No one else in the company with the same name.  He was a replacement. I had only known him three months.”

The mystery only deepened when, the following month, a statement came in from PVT John B. Phillips of the same company who recalled that Maxwell had been shot through the head by a sniper and buried where he fell. Though Phillips recalled him as being hit around six o’clock in the evening, he could only estimate the date of death as “between the 1st and 7th of July.”

                Then, on July 14th, 1919, as the search for Maxwell dragged on, PVT Thomas Adams of Valeria, KY, stated from his bed in Base Hospital #79:

“(While) advancing on July 1st, body hit by MG. Was on knees when struck, raised forward on gun. Threw up hands. Saw him afterward. Death was instantaneous. Burial detail was sent out but cannot say whether body was buried… Always laughing and very happy. Often spoke of his grandfather and how he admired him in his uniform. Very good friend of informant.”

Cordelia Stewart

Despite repeated attempts at locating PFC Maxwell’s remains, ultimately the army was forced to admit to Maxwell’s mother Cordelia Stewart (left)  in Lanham, Maryland that they were unable to locate her son. By that time a letter from a member of the company had reached her in which the statement was made that his head had been blown to pieces. As she was further informed that the fighting had been very severe at the time, his mother was further under the impression that his body had been blown to bits. Therefore, she was very understanding and amenable to her son remaining in France, even if he ever were recovered.

Investigation into Maxwell’s case was officially closed on December 28th, 1922 with the recommendation that no possibility of ID existed as no unknown had been discovered with trepanning done to his head, which would have been proof positive in identification. By that time, all the records of the unknowns in Permanent Cemetery 1764 (Aisne-Marne) had been checked and a total of seven sets of remains had been disinterred and physically examined for possible ID, including one with a pocket knife with the initials E.M.M. However, none were deemed a dental match nor had trepanning to the back of the head.

In a January 18th, 1923 form letter to his mother, the government stated that she might take comfort in the possibility that he may have been the one selected as the Unknown. How much of a comfort this would have been remains a point of speculation. In any case, she participated in the 1931 Gold Star Mothers Pilgrimage and on July 7th of that year was able to gaze upon the name of her son on the Tablets of the Missing at Aisne-Marne American Cemetery at Belleau Wood. Her other son, Allan, had also served, but had returned home unscathed.

Essel M Maxwell marker

Doughboy MIA has also had the case under investigation for some time and has concluded that it is entirely likely that PFC Maxwell actually is the unknown that was carrying the pocket knife marked E.M.M.; that the investigation at the time was flawed due to catastrophic damage to the cranium of the remains examined and a hurried process of examination; and that Maxwell therefore lies in the Aisne-Marne Cemetery at Belleau Wood to this day. Therefore Doughboy MIA has closed this case.

Would YOU like to be a part of our mission of discovering what happened to our missing Doughboys from WW1? Of course you would, and you CAN! Simply make a donation to the cause and know you played a part in making as full an accounting as possible of these men. Large or small doesn’t matter – that you cared enough to help does. Visit www.ww1cc.org/mia to make your tax deductable donation to our non-profit project today, and remember:

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Memorial flag on grass

8″ x 12″  WWI Centennial Memorial Flag

Perfect for use on Veterans Day, this WW1 Centennial Flag is made of durable nylon and measures 8 inches x 12 inches. This flag has the iconic Doughboy silhouette digitally screened onto it and is secured on a 15.75″ wooden dowel with a decorative ball on top . A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item will go towards the construction of the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. You can show your support, and help promote the efforts, by proudly displaying this flag.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


George A. Carlson

George A. Carlson (above), the grandfather of author and photographer Jeff Lowdermilk, entered the French town of Stenay on the morning of the Armistice, November 11, 1918. A century later, Lowdermilk was in Stenay for events and services marking the centennial of the end of the war. Now in 2019 he looks back to events of a year ago when his lifetime fascination with World War I came to a crescendo during the weeks leading up to the anniversary, and meditates on how the story of America in the Great War is very often the story of families.


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Martin Apostolico

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Martin Apostolico

Submitted by: Steven Apostolico {Grandson}

Martin Apostolico was born December 3, 1900 in Philadelphia, PA. Martin Apostolico served in World War I with 82nd Company, 3rd Battalion, 6th Regiment of the United States Marines. The enlistment was June 8, 1917 and the service was completed May 21, 1919.

Story of Service

My grandfather, Martin Apostolico, enlisted at the tender age of 16. He lied about both his age and name so that he would be accepted. He enlisted as Martin Woods, so that his parents would not know. He originally had his training at Parris Island, South Carolina where he was sent to Cook School. He had a scar on his arm where he cut himself learning to sharpen knifes.

It did not take long however for his parents to learn of his enlistment. His name was corrected, and he was sent to Quantico, Virginia as Martin Apostolico, where he joined a rifle company (he qualified as a sharpshooter) of the Sixth Regiment.

He arrived “Over There” on May 9, 1918. He served at Belleau Wood, Chateau-Thierry, Aisne-Marne Offensive, St Mihiel Offensive, Champagne Offensive (Blanc Mont Ridge), and the Meuse Argonne Offensive.

Read Martin Apostolico’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


PODCAST – WWl Through Many Lenses

A podcast from the World War One Centennial Commission.


View as a webpage

Doughboy Podcast A

WWI Through Many Lenses

Episode #146

Kodak VPK Camera

The Kodak Vest Pocket Camera (VPK) changed the way soldiers could show and tell their stories of service.

WWI Through Many Lenses

Host – Theo Mayer

  • Bells of Peace 2019 – Host | @02:05
  • The Cultural Impact of WWI – Dr. Jay Winter | @05:05
  • Japan’s Impact on WWI – Dr. Frederick Dickenson | @11:55
  • The Impact of WWI on the World – Sir Hugh Strachan | @19:50
  • Speaking WWI: Tank – Host | @27:15
  • WWI War Tech: Many lenses looking – Host | @28:55
  • They Shall Not Grow Old: A vision realized – Brent Burge | @33:10

More….

Listen To The Podcast NOW

All about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.

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