Category Archives: World War One Centennial Commission

WWI DISPATCH December 11, 2018

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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December 11, 2018

December 27 deadline

Time is running out to purchase the US Mint World War I Commemorative Silver Dollar

On December 27th, the U.S. Mint will close sales for their new 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar. But before they do — Have you seen the great new resources that the U.S. Mint has provided, to help tell the story of the coins, and of their background? The Mint’s program webpage here has some great new features to check out. Click here to find out more about the Mint’s resources and opportunities for Christmas giving of the WWI Commemcorative coin..

Coin Display

You can also  purchase the limited edition US Mint WWI Commemorative Coin in combination with our specially-designed display stand, personalized with information about your WWI ancestor. This will make a great collectible Christmas gift for family members and descendants of those who served in World War I. Personalization can include: rank, full name, enlisted date, deceased date, unit/decorations, battles, cemetery, etc. If you have already purchased the Commemorative Coin from the US Mint, you can order just the personalized display. Both the combo set and display alone are available at hereSupplies are limited.

However you purchase your 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar, proceeds from the sale go towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC.


“It was really about authenticity”

Brent Burge

Rarely in our lifetime will we see a tribute to the veterans of World War I that is as unique, or as vivid, as the new documentary film, “They Shall Not Grow Old”, directed by noted filmmaker Peter Jackson. The film project, which is an official  WW1CC commemorative partner, utilizes original 100-year old combat imagery that has been treated with 21st Century digital technology in restoration, colorization, visual-effects, editing — and sound. The original footage was silent, so all aspects of sound were addressed in the film’s overall sound design. The results are extraordinary, and have been heralded as a true milestone in filmmaking by critics. The film’s sound achievements came from the remarkable talents of Brent Burge (left), the film’s Supervising Sound Editor. A legend in the world of sound editing for film, Burge was interviewed recently for the WWI Centennial Commission Podcast. Click here to read a detailed transcript of the Burge interview, and find out the extraordinary process to bring authentic sound to silent film from WWI.


Great Uncle Willie gets his Purple Heart 100 years after his death in World War I

William James Williams, Jr.

In his soon-to-be-released documentary, “They Shall Not Grow Old,” based on actual World War I film footage, “Lord of the Rings” director Peter Jackson explained that his grandfather had actually fought in the war. He offered this explanation for why he had taken on the project. “I think it’s great if we can just pause for a moment and think about them for a bit because they are part of our family, part of us. We still carry their DNA … let’s pause in our modern lives for a second and think about what they went through,” he told Britain’s Forces TV. It’s a quote Poway CPA Robert Knight invokes to explain why he requested a Purple Heart award ceremony for his great uncle William James Williams, Jr. (left), 100 years after he died during a German U-boat attack in World War I on the Coast Guard Cutter Tampa. Click here to read more about how the ceremony for Great uncle Willie came about..


“Many of the issues that surfaced because of the war have never gone away”

Steven Trout

Dr. Steven Trout (left) is a professor at the University of South Alabama, where, he leads a unique organization — the Center for War and Memory. The Center is an interdisciplinary team of scholars committed to advancing the study of war remembrance in all its forms — including public memorials, civic rituals, works of literature and film, television programs, and web sites. The Center hosts speakers and conferences, offers online scholarly materials, and serves as a resource on all matters related to war commemoration. World War I Centennial Commission intern Lee Febos was able to talk to Professor Trout about the Center, his work there, and his thoughts on World War I in America. Click here to read the entire thoughtful and wide-ranging interview about how “remembrance is itself a kind of battlefield with warring forces and winners and losers.”


Google Doodle pays tribute to Edith Cavell, heroic World War I nurse

Edith Cavell doodle snip

A British nurse who risked — and ultimately lost — her life to help British and French soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium in World War I was remembered with a Google Doodle on December 4. A pioneer of modern nursing, Cavell was in Belgium in 1914 when war broke out. She immediately returned to Brussels, where she pledged to treat casualties of all nationalities — regardless of their allegiance. She simultaneously became involved with an underground group that sheltered French and British soldiers. Together, they helped around 200 men to escape occupied Belgium. But disaster struck in August 1915 when Cavell was caught, arrested, and charged with treason. She confessed to a German military court and was executed on October 12, 1915, despite an international outcry. Click here to read more about Clavell and her legacy.


Jackson poster ad

Only two dates in December to see
this remarkable World War I film!

Fathom Events has partnered with Warner Bros. Pictures to bring Academy Award® winner Peter Jackson’s poignant WWI documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old” to select cinemas on December 17 and 27 only.

The film is presented in 2D and RealD 3D. The acclaimed documentary is an extraordinary look at the soldiers and events of the Great War, using film footage captured at the time, now presented as the world has never seen. By utilizing state-of-the-art restoration, colorization and 3D technologies, and pulling from 600 hours of BBC archival interviews, Jackson puts forth an intensely gripping, immersive and authentic experience through the eyes and voices of the British soldiers who lived it.  For tickets, visit FathomEvents.com


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Historian Corner: Professor Joanna Bourk on WW1’s Legacy of Pain and Fear

Joanna Bourk

In December 7th’s WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 100, host Theo Mayer spoke with Professor Joanna Bourk (left) about the steep impact of military wounds, both mental and physical, on both the men and women who carried them, and the widespread and lingering effects of the psychological health of individuals and nations alike in the years following the war. and society at large. Click here to read a complete transcript of the interview,

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

In December 7th’s WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 100, host Theo Mayer spoke with Dr. Glyn Prysor and Peter Francis of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, a British organization dedicated to honoring the war dead of Great Britain and the Commonwealth nations from the First and Second World Wars. Click here to read a transcript of the interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New – Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Commonwealth headstones instead of crosses

Episode #100
Highlights: The Aftermath – Part I

Host: Theo Mayer
Part I of a special 2-part series examining the immediate aftermath of the Armistice signing.

  • Preview of coming attractions – Host | @00:25
  • The immediate aftermath – Mike Shuster | @04:15
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission – Dr. Glyn Prysor and Peter Francis | @07:50
  • War, wounds, pain and fear – Professor Joanna Burke | @18:00
  • Coming Home – Jonathan Casey | @26:40
  • Hello Girls the Musical – Cara Reichel and Peter Mills | @33:00
  • Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old” – Brent Burge | @42:10

Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Letters That You Will Not Get: Women’s Voices from the Great War

By Susan Werbe

Susan Werbe is back with another remarkable performance! WWICC featured Werbe for her 2014 The Great War Theatre Project: Messengers of a Bitter Truth, a multi-media theatre piece. It has evolved now to include music as a way of introducing women’s writings. This week at WWRite,

Werbe talks about her latest piece, Letters That You Will Not Get: Women’s Voices from The Great War, a song cycle based on women’s writings from both sides of the conflict and set to contemporary music. Read this moving post about the premiere performance in New York at WWrite!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

The Army Biscuit

A remarkable WW1 attic find, the complaints of a war-time goat, and soldiers’ dental health: read about the despised Army hard tack biscuit at Behind Their Lines.  


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Vest

Black Full Zip Fleece Vest

Inspired by the iconic image of a U.S. Doughboy, you can wear your warm American pride with this Made in the USA full zip fleece vest. An informal term for a member of the U.S. Army or Marine Corps, “Doughboys” especially used to refer to the American Expeditionary Forces in World War One. Largely comprised of young men who had dropped out of school to join the army, this poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. Vest features: Black with white Doughboy embroidery. 100% spun polyester, 12.5 Oz. Premium anti-piling fleece. Vest has full zip front with two side seam pockets. Men’s sizes available S – 2XL. Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers



Hello Girls snip

The “Hello Girls” Off-Broadway musical production, an official World War One Centennial Commission Commemorative Partner,  is currently playing at the 59E59 Theatres in New York, NY through December 22nd. The show is garnering both big audiences and good reviews, including one in The New York Times. If you’re in (or going to be in) New York City this month, you don’t want to miss this show. Click here to find out more about the play, its creators, and how you can get tickets to catch one of the final performances.


A MUST SEE EXPERIENCE!

Peter Jackson’s amazing WWI documentary…
100 year old film in 3D
and Color

They Shall Not Grow Old Jackson Vertical Banner


Event Register red

you can help - shop using amazon smile


100 cities 100 memorials

Poppy Seed Side Ad


Doughboy MIA



Pershing Sponsors


Founding Sponsor

founding sponsor pritzker military museum and library


email us


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Clyde C. Handley

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Clyde C. Handley

Submitted by: Benjamin Woodard

Clyde C. Handley born around 1894, Clyde Handley served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Clyde C. Handley was born Mar 21, 1894, to Jefferson and Ella Handley. He lived and worked on a farm in the Culloden area. He was inducted into service on May 25, 1918. He trained at Camp Lee, Virginia, before being shipped overseas on Aug 6, 1918, on the MADAWASKA. He was transferred between several units but ended up as a Private in Company C, 131st Infantry Regiment, 33rd Division, American Expeditionary Force, US Army.

According to a Private in his company, “During the Meuse-Argonne offensive, in our action east of the Meuse, Company C was occupying a position on the bald hill about a kilometer north of the Bois de Plat-Chene. On October 11th at about 3:30 PM. I was returning with other stretcher bearers from the rear when, upon reaching a point in the ravine between Bois Plat-Chene and Bois de Chaume, the enemy began to shell the locality heavily and we entered a dug-out for protection. Before we emerged from the dug-out to continue, Pvt. Handley and Worden of our company passed along with a supply of water which they were carrying to the front.”

Read Clyde C. Handley’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


The Aftermath Part I: Ep. #100

From the World War One Centennial Commission.


View as a webpage

WW1 Centennial News Logo

The Aftermath Part I

Episode #100

Commonwealth headstones instead of crosses

In the Commonwealth, they chose to use headstones instead of crosses for their fallen with the soldier’s nationality and religion carved in.

Highlights: The Run-up to the Armistice

Host: Theo Mayer

Part I of a special 2-part series examining the immediate aftermath of the Armistice signing.

  • Preview of coming attractions – Host | @00:25
  • The immediate aftermath – Mike Shuster  | @04:15
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission – Dr. Glyn Prysor and Peter Francis | @07:50
  • War, wounds, pain and fear – Professor Joanna Burke | @18:00
  • Coming Home – Jonathan Casey | @26:40
  • Hello Girls the Musical – Cara Reichel and Peter Mills | @33:00
  • Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old” – Brent Burge | @42:10

Listen To The Podcast NOW

Learn all about WW1 and the centennial while you drive, work or play.


Coming up next week:

Part II of a special 2-part series examining the immediate aftermath of the Armistice signing.

  • American Battle Monuments Commission
  • Historian Sir Hugh Strachan
  • Gold Star Mothers
  • and more….
Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


Join live recording

Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

New Twitter Handle for Podcast:

 @TheWW1Podcast

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


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WWI DISPATCH December 4, 2018

Note this newsletter from a World War I organization that we received earlier today.


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December 4, 2018

President George H. W. Bush family had notable history of World War I service

Bush family

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission is truly saddened by the loss of former President George H. W. Bush (top left). In addition to his many well-known accolades and achievements, he also served as an Honorary Commission Chair for our organization. His ties to WWI were strong. President Bush’s father, Prescott Bush (center left), served as a U.S. Army field artillery officer during the war. The war broke out while Prescott Bush was a college student at Yale University. Upon graduation, he accepted an officer’s commission, and served as a field artillery captain with the Connecticut National Guard. President Bush’s grandfather, Samuel Bush (bottom left), also contributed to the war effort, as a senior government official working with wartime weapons contracts. In the spring of 1918, famous banker Bernard Baruch was asked to reorganize the War Industries Board as the U.S. prepared to enter World War I. He placed several prominent businessmen to key posts. Samuel Bush became chief of the Ordnance, Small Arms, and Ammunition Section, with national responsibility for government assistance to and relations with munitions companies.  Click here to read more about the Bush’s family’s World War I service to our nation. Also, click here to visit the Roll of Honor web site for more information on Prescott Bush.


U.S. Mint’s 2018 WWI Commemorative Silver Dollar only available to December 27

Don Everhart

We bring you this story as a repeat from March of this year. The U.S. Mint’s 2018 World War I Commemorative Silver Dollar is a collectible coin that is only available for another three weeks. The coin makes a wonderful holiday present — and it gives you the opportunity to directly participate in the creation of the new National World War I Memorial in Washington DC. A $10.00 surcharge from every coin sale will go to our Centennial Commission to help build the Memorial.  The sculptor of the WWI Centennial Coin, Don Everhart (left) is a legend in the world of numismatic design and sculpting. Don began his professional career at The Franklin Mint, where he worked as a sculptor from 1975 to 1980. From 1980 to 2004, he worked as a freelance artist, designing figurines, plates, coins, and medals for Walt Disney, Tiffany, the Royal Norwegian Mint and the British Royal Mint. He joined the U.S. Mint in 2004. There, he created designs for numerous coins and medals; his work resides in the permanent collections of The Smithsonian Institute, The British museum, and The American Numismatic Society. He retired from the U.S. Mint last year as the Lead Sculptor — and his last coin project was our WWI Centennial Silver Dollar. Our WWI coin was special to him, so we discussed it with him, in the context of his incredible career.


“I let him know how much I value our veterans and fallen heroes”

Matthew Haske

When 13-year-old Matthew Haske wrote a letter to President Donald Trump about his World War One commemorative trip to France, he never thought that he would be invited to attend the ceremony for the Armistice at Suresnes with his father. He “worked and saved all of his money for two years to make this trip to France” as Trump mentioned in his speech at the ceremony. U.S. World War I Centennial Commission Intern Wanxing Niu asked Matthew about his passion for World War I and his journey to France. Click here to read Matthew’s responses to her questions, including what he thought about meeting the President.


Hello Girls documentary movie honored by PBS “To the Contrary” TV series

Hello Girlsmovie poster

The PBS “To the Contrary” television series announced the winners of their 2018 About Women and Girls film festival, and among the awardees was The Hello Girls documentary. The “To the Contrary” film festival highlights the rights and struggles of women, girls and diverse communities. Winners in the film festival will have their films broadcast nationally on PBS in the coming year. The TV series “To the Contrary” airs on PBS stations nationwide, on Canadian television and Voice of America internationally. Click here to learn more about the award given to The Hello Girls documentary.


100 years ago: Allies WWI victory is marred by riots in Newport News, VA

Newport News

When World War I ended in triumph a century ago on Nov. 11, 1918, the nation’s second-largest wartime port staged a jubilant downtown parade — with 50 Langley Field planes flying overhead and long columns of uniformed men marching down Washington Avenue. But just hours after the cheering and flag-waving stopped, thousands of soldiers and sailors returned to ravage the commercial district of Newport News in a spectacular outbreak of vandalism, arson and looting spurred by pent-up anger over price gouging. So wild was the two-hour-long orgy of revenge that it took a clever decoying tactic and 300 military policemen with fixed bayonets to quell the marauders. Click here to read more about underlying the causes of the spectacular riots, which created “a combustible mix waiting for a spark. And that spark came with the end of the war.”


A new name for American Legion Post 9

American Legion Post 9 renaming ceremony

An American Legion post in southeastern Indiana is continuing the nationwide trend of posts highlighting the link between World War I and The American Legion’s formation, by renaming itself after a Hoosier hero of that war. In the rural part of the county, Maj. Samuel Woodfill was born in 1883. He enlisted in the Army in 1901, and served in the Philippine-American War and at the Mexican border before the start of World War I. On Oct. 12, 1918, in Cunel, France – during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive – Woodfill’s actions against a German machine-gun nest, which culminated in hand-to-hand fighting, resulted in his receipt of the Medal of Honor, making him the only Hoosier to earn one during the war. Click here to read more about Major Woodfill, and the American Legion post that now bears his proud name.


2 days in December to see this remarkable World War I film!

Jackson poster ad

Fathom Events has partnered with Warner Bros. Pictures to bring Academy Award® winner Peter Jackson’s poignant WWI documentary “They Shall Not Grow Old” to select cinemas on December 17and 27 only.

The film is presented in 2D and RealD 3D. The acclaimed documentary is an extraordinary look at the soldiers and events of the Great War, using film footage captured at the time, now presented as the world has never seen. By utilizing state-of-the-art restoration, colorization and 3D technologies, and pulling from 600 hours of BBC archival interviews, Jackson puts forth an intensely gripping, immersive and authentic experience through the eyes and voices of the British soldiers who lived it. For tickets, visit FathomEvents.com


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Holding Onto the Silver Greyhounds’ Tail

By Felicita Trueblood

In August 1918, Captain Wallace F. Hamilton was plucked from the Front to help lead the Silver Greyhounds, the first Overseas Courier Service, in Paris.

He made drawings and wrote a memoir of his experience, but these were stolen from the family’s archive in 1972.

In 2008, Hamilton’s daughter, Felicita Trueblood, went on an incredible quest to recover the lost items and then decided to publish the manuscript and the images.

This week at WWRite, read the post “Holding Onto the Silver Greyhounds’ Tail,” about Trueblood’s journey to reveal both the little-known story about the courier service and the story of her father’s WWI artistic life!


Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

This week at the Behind Their Lines blog, read British medical worker Louis Golding writes of the sadness that characterized life after the Armistice in his poem “Broken Bodies.” 


Doughboy MIA for week of Dec. 3

Edward M. Beneker

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday’s MIA this week is is Private Edward M. Beneker. The son of Henry and Catherine Beneker, Ed Beneker was a farmer born in South Gate, Indiana on September 20th, 1895. He entered the service on March 28th, 1918 and trained at Camp Taylor, Kentucky before being assigned to Company D, 115th Infantry, 29th Division at Camp McClellan, Alabama. With them he went overseas in June, 1918 and saw action that summer. Reported wounded on October 23rd, 1918, his status was later changed to killed in action, though his grave was never located. Nothing else is known of his case at this time.

Would you like to help solve Private Beneker’s case? Then why not give Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Necktie

World War One Aviation Silk Tie

Looking for a Christmas for “that guy”? Look no further: get him this 100% woven silk tie that has been custom created for the World War One Centennial Commission.  This red silk tie features World War One era aircraft and the official logo of the Centennial Commission on the back.  This beautiful tie also comes packaged in a 2 piece box with the Doughboy seal printed on the top.

Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other Christmas gifts are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers

Coin Display

You can now purchase the limited edition US Mint World War I Commemorative Coin, in combination with our specially-designed display stand, personalized with information about your WWI ancestor. This will make a great collectible Christmas gift for family members and descendants of those who served in World War I. Personalization can include: rank, full name, enlisted date, deceased date, unit/decorations, battles, cemetery, etc. If you have already purchased the Commemorative Coin from the US Mint, you can order just the personalized display. Both the combo set and display alone are available at hereSupplies are limited. Proceeds from the sale of this item go towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC.


A MUST SEE EXPERIENCE!

Peter Jackson’s amazing WWI documentary…
100 year old film in 3D
and Color

They Shall Not Grow Old Jackson Vertical Banner

Event Register Ad Women

you can help - shop using amazon smile


100 cities 100 memorials

Poppy Seed Side Ad


Doughboy MIA



Pershing Sponsors


Founding Sponsor

founding sponsor pritzker military museum and library


email us


websitefacebooktwitter


George H. Ratterman

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

George Ratterman

Submitted by: John L. Nolan {Great Nephew}

George H. Ratterman born around 1898. George Ratterman served in World War 1 with the United States Army Air Corps. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

George H Ratterman joined the US Air Service and on 6/12/18 was assigned to the newly formed 96th Bombardment Squadron in the 1st Day Bombarment Group. This Squadron operated over the American Sector of the Front starting in mid May 1918.

When the St. Mihiel offensive began, the German railhead at Conflans was a frequent target for the 96th. On July 10th, 1918, the entire 1st Day Group was to make bombing attacks behind the German lines. The 96th’s target was Conflans. Due to very poor weather conditions, all units except the 96th decided not to fly. Six Breguet 14’s, each with their crew of two headed towards their target. Lt George Ratterman was in one of those bombers.

With no way to see the ground and primitive instrumentation they had no way to realize how strong the tail wind became, pushing them deeper into Germany than expected. Eventually the Squadron Commander, Major Brown realized they were not going to see their target and signaled for the Squad to turn back. Now the wind was in their face, slowing their progress back to the safety of France. One by one the Breguet’s began to run out of fuel. Each was forced to land. Each crew was unhurt, but all were captured.

Read George H. Ratterman’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


WWI DISPATCH November 27, 2018

From the World War One Centennial Commission.


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November 27, 2018

U.S. Mint’s 2018 WWI Commemorative Silver Dollar only available to Dec. 27

Transfield

We bring you this story as a repeat from November of last year. The U.S. Mint’s 2018 World War I Commemorative Silver Dollar is a collectible coin that is only available for another four weeks. The coin makes a wonderful holiday present — and it gives you the opportunity to directly participate in the creation of the new National World War I Memorial in Washington DC. A $10.00 surcharge from every coin sale will go to our Centennial Commission to help build the Memorial. The designer of the Centennial Silver Dollar is Leroy Transfield (left). He is an experienced sculptor from New Zealand. His design was picked through an open international competition, hosted by the U.S. Mint, and this is his first coin for them. Click here to revisit our conversation with him about the coin, the inspiration, and his own personal ties to World War I.


“A First Look” events build awareness of and excitement for new WWI Memorial

Tableau vivant snip

America paused to remember World War I on the 100th anniversary of its close: At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the Great War ended. America’s entry the previous year set the course of American history and ignited passions of allegiance and heroism in the four million Americans who served and the 116, 525 men and women who sacrificed their lives. For a period of five days this month, November 8 through November 12, citizens could look into the lives and stories of diverse groups and individuals who served and supported the US military in WWI. Nine public events held in Pershing Park, Washington, D.C., site of the National World War I Memorial, saluted all military and veterans who served in WWI and the 100 years since.  Click here to read more about the A First Look special events that paid tribute to the significance of the anniversary of the Armistice.

Dawn patrol

For the Armistice Centennial, the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission hosted a number of events — concerts, religious services, education symposia, commemorations, gatherings — across the National Capital region, over the course of 8-12 November. The schedule represented an incredible partnership with such remarkable teammates as the Kennedy Center, the National Cathedral, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and many, many others. Called the ACE Events — for Armistice Centennial Events — they brought together long-term supporters of the Centennial activities over the years, with new members of our World War I community, many of whom have direct and indirect ties to people who served in the war. Click here to view galleries of photos that show the preparation and execution of some of the Commission’s own ACE events.


New Art Exhibit at the National Museum of the Marine Corps Highlights WWI US Navy and Marine Corps Combat Scenes

Art Exhibit at the National Museum of the Marine Corps

To commemorate the centennial of the end of World War I, curators of the Marine Corps and the U.S. Navy art collections collaborated in a joint exhibition, “A World at War: The Marine Corps and the U.S. Navy in World War I” at the National Museum of the Marine Corps (NMMC). This collection of artwork by 42 artists depicts the experiences of Marines, Sailors, and civilians during “the war to end all wars.” Click here to read more about this collection of WWI artwork that was created by service members, some of America’s leading illustrators, and even some unknown artists.


Commissioner Naylor in Veterans Voices: “Veterans, Write your Story!”

Veterans Voices

Writing in the Fall 2018 issue of Veterans Voices magazine, World War I Centennial Commission Commissioner Dr. Matthew Naylor, who is also President and CEO of the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, MO, encourages modern-day Veterans to follow the example of Americans who served in WWI: write about your experiences in the service of your nation. He notes that “sharing the veteran experience empowers the serviceperson and benefits their community” while “fostering a connection between the two while also deepening the connection between society and the military.” Click here to read Dr. Naylor’s entire thoughtful article connecting WWI Veterans with their contemporaries in the 21st Century.

You can help share the written or spoken World War I memories of your own ancestors, family members, or others who served our nation 100 years ago by submitting their information to the WWI Centennial Commission web site’s Stories of Service section, using the submission form here.


Michigan celebrates the life of Eugene I. VanAntwerp during special event for Armistice Day Centennial in Detroit

VanAntwerp

The Michigan World War I Centennial Committee hosted a special commemorative ceremony to honor a heroic native-son, and to dedicate this year’s Veterans Day/Armistice Day to his memory. Our Centennial Commission was represented at the ceremony by Commissioner Debra Anderson. That native-son was Eugene I. VanAntwerp (left), former mayor of Detroit from 1948-1959, and National Commander-in-Chief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars 1938-1939. Click here to read the entire story about VanAntwerp’s military and industrial contributions to America’s war efforts.


“Connecticut Fights, The Story of the 102nd Regiment” commemorative edition

Connecticut Fights

The Connecticut State Library has released the limited first edition republished “Connecticut Fights: The Story of the 102nd Regiment” by Capt. Daniel Strickland. This book is a remarkable account of the World War I experiences of this legendary infantry regiment. Christine Pittsley, Project Director for the Connecticut State Library’s “Remembering World War One: Sharing History/Preserving Memories” shared the announcement with us. Click here to read the entire article about how this historic volume was reassembled from 70-year old printed pages to tell again the stories of the CT heroes.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Historian Corner: David Pietrusza

David Pietrusza

In November 2nd’s WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 96, host Theo Mayer spoke with historian David Pietrusza about one of history’s deadliest pandemics, the Spanish Flu. This virus wreaked havoc on the war-weary peoples of the world, killing an estimated 50 to 100 million. Despite its massive impact, the history of the Spanish Flu is largely forgotten or ignored in the broader discussion of WW1. Mr. Pietrusza answers questions about the origins and consequences of the Spanish Flu, and why so little attention is paid to it. Click here to read a transcript of the entire absorbing interview,


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New – Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Enjoying a thanksgiving dinner in 1918

Episode #99
Thanksgiving Special

Host: Theo Mayer

What are we thankful for on this Thanksgiving? | @ 00:25

How to help build the National WWI Memorial in Washington DC | @ 02:45

Memorial Sculptor Sabin Howard on the sculpture design | @ 06:55

President Wilson’s 1918 Thanksgiving Proclamation | @ 10:50

Commission Executive Director Dan Dayton | @ 15:55

Commission Chairman Terry Hamby | @ 17:25


Literature in WWI This Week

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Accidental Tourism and War Memorials

By Eric Chandler

As a veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan, writer Eric Chandler discusses the voyage he’s taken (mostly on foot!) to grasp the lasting impact of WWI.

In this week’s WWrite post, “Accidental Tourism and War Memorials,” Chandler, author of Hugging This Rock, Outside Duluth, and Down In It, brings us along with him as he jogs through major American and Canadian cities searching for traces of WWI amidst other war memorials.

Read this compelling post about Chandler’s awakening to the presence of World War I history in our daily lives at WWrite this week!


Doughboy MIA for week of Nov. 26

Melvin Tinsley

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday’s MIA this week is Private Melvin Tinsley. Born in Atlanta, Georgia, on 21 March, 1895, Melvin Darden Tinsley joined the United States Marine Corps on June 26th, 1917 and took his training at Parris Island, South Carolina. Assigned to the 48th Company/6th Marines/2nd Division, Private Tinsley arrived overseas on November 20th, 1917. He served in the Toul Sector, the Aisne Defensive, at Chateau Thierry, and finally during the Aisne-Marne Offensive, where he was severely wounded in action on July 19th, 1918 at Soissons. He died later that day of his wounds. Nothing else is known of his case at this time.

Would you like to help us solve Private Tinsley’s case? Can you spare ten dollars? Why not give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIAand help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Key Tags

“Nothing Stops These Men” Key Tag

Still one of the favorite WWI Centennial Commemoration items, this handsome key tag is a great addition to your keys! Inspired by an original World War One poster, this key tag features the dramatic image of a bayonet advance on the enemy, with the United States flag in the upper corner.

A functional way to show your patriotism, this 1-1/4” long, custom key tag has a bright gold finish, with color-fill, and is offered exclusively through the World War One Centennial Commission.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Coin Display

You can now purchase the limited edition US Mint World War I Commemorative Coin, in combination with our specially-designed display stand, personalized with information about your WWI ancestor. This will make a great collectible gift for family members and descendants of those who served in World War I. Personalization can include: rank, full name, enlisted date, deceased date, unit/decorations, battles, cemetery, etc. If you have already purchased the Commemorative Coin from the US Mint, you can order just the personalized display. Both the combo set and display alone are available at hereSupplies are limited.Proceeds from the sale of this item go towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC.


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John BKane

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John B Kane

Submitted by: Gus and LaWanda Zimmerman {Grandson}

John BKane was born around 1893. John Kane served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

The Khaki Road

My grandfather, John BKane, an architect who lived in the Philadelphia area, died when I was twelve years old. He never discussed his time in the service during WWI.

When my mother was an adult, she discovered a book he wrote to her when she was ten years old. The “little story” was typed on fragile onion skin paper, written as though he were telling his young daughter stories about his military service. We speculate that he wrote the book because WWII was just starting, and he couldn’t imagine how the leaders would allow such monumental sacrifice to occur again.

WWI was the first time Americans fought overseas, consequently resulting in the formation of the Graves Registration Service. His drafting experience was put to good use by designing and plotting the first of many American cemeteries in France.

Read John BKane‘s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


CYBER MONDAY OPPORTUNITY – Commemorative WWI Silver Dollar

From the World War One Centennial Commission.


Commission main logo
Stars

Cyber Monday Holiday Special

Coin Group

Last Chance
To Get This U.S. Mint issued
Commemorative WWI Silver Dollar

Commemorative Coint

Authorized by Congress, only two commemorative coins per year are developed by the US Mint to celebrate and honor Americans. The World War I, 2018 Centennial Silver Dollar honors the 100th anniversary of America’s involvement in World War I, and raises funds to help build the US National World War I Memorial in the nation’s capital.

This is a true limited edition collectible, minted at the Philadelphia Mint. The coin is accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from the U.S. Mint.

The limited edition coin will only be available from the U.S. Mint
until December 27, 2018, 11:59 p.m. EST

Get from U.S. Mint


Optional Personalized Display
to Honor YOUR ancestor

Personalized Display

Because this rare coin continually increases in value, it can become a valuable heirloom that can be kept in your family for years to come, along with the memory of your family’s WWI veteran.

To support this, we have designed a special coin display stand with an engraved personalization plate to honor your World War I ancestor. This will make a great collectible gift for family members and descendants of those who served in the War that Changed the World.

Coin & Display Stand


This purchase will help to build the
National World War I Memorial in Washington DC

Lean More About The Memorial

Special: Thanksgiving – Ep. #99

From the World War One Centennial Commission.


View as a webpage

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Special:
Thanksgiving

Episode #99

Enjoying a thanksgiving dinner in 1918

Enjoying a traditional Thanksgiving dinner 1918

Special: Thanksgiving 1918

Host: Theo Mayer

  • What are we thankful for on this Thanksgiving? | @ 00:25
  • How to help build the National WWI Memorial in Washington DC | @ 02:45
  • Memorial Sculptor Sabin Howard on the sculpture design | @ 06:55
  • President Wilson’s 1918 Thanksgiving Proclamation | @ 10:50
  • Commission Executive Director Dan Dayton | @ 15:55
  • Commission Chairman Terry Hamby | @ 17:25

Listen To Podcast

Learn all about WW1 and the centennial while you drive, work or play.

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Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


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Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

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 @TheWW1Podcast

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


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WWI DISPATCH November 20, 2018

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission


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November 20, 2018

Service at Washington National Cathedral on November 11 honors Americans’ service, sacrifices in World War I

WNC service November 11

It was the day of commemoration that we had all looked forward to — the Centennial of the Armistice. People filled Washington National Cathedral on Sunday 11 November, to honor Americans’ sacrifices in World War I. In a sacred service that recalled the thousands of lives lost and the joy that followed news of the armistice, members of the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission and other officials paid tribute to a generation largely forgotten in the wake of later conflicts. At 11 a.m. – exactly 100 years after hostilities ceased, at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month — the crowd fell silent and the cathedral’s bourdon bell tolled 21 times. Click here to read more about the sacred service, and other Commission activities in Washington, DC on November 11.


Bells of Peace Ring Across the United States on November 11, 2018

Bells of Peace at NWWIM&M

From Washington, DC, to Honolulu, HI, and everywhere in between, plus U.S. military facilities worldwide, and aboard ships at sea, Bells of Peace tolled on Sunday, November 11, in solemn remembrance of the nation’s sacrifices in World War I, and in honor of all veterans. Participating organizations and individuals numbered in the tens of thousands. Over 23,000 people downloaded the Bells of Peace Smartphone App. Among those who tolled bells were veterans’ organizations, houses of worship, veterans’ cemeteries, patriotic and civic associations, universities, national and state parks, museums, senior living homes, and even restaurants. The World War I Centennial Commission received proclamations from the states, U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia in support of Bells of Peace. Nationwide, 120 cities, counties, and towns also issued proclamations. Click here to read more about how Bells of Peace tolled across the nation and around the world.


NFL teams honor World War I veterans

Halas

Sunday, 11 November, was a day of remembrance around the world, for those who served and were lost during World War I. Among those who helped to mark the occasion were various teams from the National Football League. You see, Sunday 11 November was also NFL Gameday — which served as a great public platform to tell the story of our veterans. In Chicago, the Bears football team had special reason to mark the day, as the team’s original founder and owner, George Halas (left), served in the Navy during World War I. Click here to read more about how the Bears and other NFL teams helped mark the centennial of the Armistice in stadiums across the nation.


Doughboys remembered, saluted in 2018 New York City Veterans Day Parade

Doughboy color guard NYC parade 11112018

The East Coast Doughboys and the Long Island Living History Association were out in force November 11 to participate in the 2018 NYC Veterans Day Parade. The parade, produced every year by the United War Veterans Council, took on an important World War I theme, as it fell on the day of the Armistice Centennial. Some 110 living history reenactors mustered for the parade — to include people portraying Americans and Allies, soldiers, generals, nurses, and even WWI-era civilians. They brought with them a variety of gear, to include cars, trucks, and bicycles. Click here to read more about Doughboys on parade in NYC, and see spectacular photos of the participants.


A special Armistice tribute in New London, WI for a missing Doughboy

Laplander with McGrath plaque

Robert Laplander, Founder and Director of the Doughboy MIA project of the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, and author of Finding the Lost Battalion, was an honored guest of the family of MIA Doughboy Eugene Michael McGrath on November 11 in Wisconsin, to help unveil a plaque honoring the soldier at his place of birth.  Laplander’s 15 years of research to determine McGrath’s fate was the genesis of the Doughboy MIA effort, but his efforts had a powerful effect on McGrath’s family as well. Click here to read more about how the search for a missing Doughboy helped a family find itself again.


100 years after his death, family of Irish immigrant World War I soldier finally receives his Purple Heart

Pvt. Michael Walsh

U.S. Army Pvt. Michael Walsh’s family had waited over 100 years for this moment: the opportunity to honor their fallen hero. Walsh, an immigrant from Ireland, served with the American Expeditionary Forces in France through some of the bloodiest fighting of World War I. He would be one of the last men in his company killed during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in the fall of 1918 in which more than 26,000 Americans died. After Walsh’s death, his family was never told details about what happened to him during the war, and they were never given the medals that Walsh so rightfully earned. Thanks to the World War I Centennial Commission’s partner Purple Hearts Reunited, Walsh’s nieces and nephews — some now third generation — received his Purple Heart award in Glasnevin cemetery in Dublin last week.  Click here to read more about the long-delayed delivery of the medal to Walsh’s family, another successful chapter in the mission of Purple Hearts Reunited.


100 years ago – Breaking News of the ‘False Armistice’ rocks America

False Armistice

The ‘real’ Armistice agreement with Germany, signed on Monday 11 November 1918, finally ended the First World War with a cease-fire starting at 11 o’clock that morning. It was the last of the September-November 1918 armistices between the belligerents, and was celebrated with enormous joy and relief in the Allied countries. But four days earlier, on Thursday 7 November, false news of an armistice agreement had provoked similar rejoicing by millions of people across the world. Celebrated in France, Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Cuba, Argentina, and probably elsewhere, this was the so-called False Armistice. Click here to read more about how misunderstanding created premature relief for warring nations. And see the Podcast article below for more information on the False Armistice.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

100 Years Ago: Run-Up To The Armistice 

False Armistice reaction NYC

From November 11th’s WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 97: Theo Mayer takes us through the dramatic events of the week leading up to November 11th, 1918. With her allies already out of the war, Germany’s government begins to break down. Negotiations between the Allies and Germany continue for several days. Finally, on the 11th, the War That Changed the World ceases and the Allied nations celebrate. Click here to read a complete transcript of this podcast.

The Armistice 

Daily Missourian close clip

Few documents in history can match the significance of the Armistice, the agreement that officially ended the Great War on Allied terms. Clearly, the Armistice represented a massive blow to German prestige, and together with the Treaty of Versailles, exacted a heavy punishment on a broken nation. Sadly, the peace that began with the signing of the Armistice would be shattered just two decades later. Click here to hear the entire Armistice, as read by host Theo Mayer in Episode 97 of the World War 1 Centennial News Podcast:


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo new

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New – Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Sacred Service Special Image

Episode #98
Special:
Sacred Service

This special episode brings you the inspiring sound of World War I Armistice Day Sacred Service, a multi-denominational service honoring the Centennial of the WWI Armistice, from the WWI Centennial Commission in partnership with Washington National Cathedral.

Download the Sacred Service program (a keepsake in its own right) at this link.


Literature in WWI This Week

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A Story of Regeneration – Hemingway’s “Big Two-Hearted River”

According to writer Brandon Caro, Ernest Hemingway’s “Two Big-Hearted River,” tells the tale of WWI soldier who comes home and seeks to regenerate his soul after the prolonged trauma of combat through the story of a fishing trip.

In this week’s WWrite post, Caro, who is the author of the novel,Old Silk Road, and has published in The New York Times, The Daily Beast, and  Whitehot Magazine of Contemporary Art,  talks about the ways this story resonates with his own experience as a veteran of Afghanistan. 

Read Brandon Caro’s compelling post,  “A Story of Regeneration – Hemingway’s “Big Two-Hearted River” at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

Remembrance Day, 1921

Across time and national boundaries, veterans have often returned from war only to face economic hardships that seem to minimize their sacrifices.  “Remembrance Day, 1921” poignantly gives voice to dead soldiers who sympathize with their comrades who have survived war.  .


Doughboy MIA for week of Nov. 19

Private Lorton Register

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday’s MIA this week is Private Lorton Register. Born in Gilmer County, Georgia, Lorton Webster Register entered the Regular Army at Ft. Thomas, Kentucky, on April 15th, 1917. Attached to the 18th Infantry/1st Division, he was among the first troops to set foot in France. He was killed in action on the night of March 1st, 1918, while at a listening post ahead of the lines. Nothing else is currently known about this case.

Would you like to help us solve Private Register’s case? Can you spare ten dollars? Then why not give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget Book Cover

“Lest We Forget: The Great War” is brand new way for you to help build America’s WWI Memorial, in Washington DC. At the same time, you get to enjoy a very special, colorful, inspiring and lasting souvenir of the centennial!

The book features nearly 350 high-quality images, an introduction by Sir Hew Strachan and text by historian Michael W. Robbins. The project is dedicated to the Centennial and produced by The Pritzker Military Museum and Library along with the WW1 Centennial Commission.

Importantly, when you get this visual remembrance of the “War that Changed The World”  – a full ½ of the proceeds go to building the Memorial!

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Coin Display

You can now purchase the limited edition US Mint World War I Commemorative Coin, in combination with our specially-designed display stand, personalized with information about your WWI ancestor. This will make a great collectible gift for family members and descendants of those who served in World War I. Personalization can include: rank, full name, enlisted date, deceased date, unit/decorations, battles, cemetery, etc. If you have already purchased the Commemorative Coin from the US Mint, you can order just the personalized display. Both the combo set and display alone are available at hereSupplies are limited. Proceeds from the sale of this item go towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC.


Event Register Ad Women

you can help - shop using amazon smile


100 cities 100 memorials

Poppy Seed Side Ad


Doughboy MIA


Pershing Sponsors


Founding Sponsor

founding sponsor pritzker military museum and library


email us


websitefacebooktwitter


John August Kiecker

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John August Kiecker

Submitted by: Janet L. Rajala {Grand Niece}

John August Kiecker born around 1890. John Kiecker served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

John August Kiecker served as a corporal in the American Expeditionary Force of the U.S. Army under General John J. Pershing. Although I have few records of his service, the following is an excerpt from a letter he wrote to his nephew, John Lietzau, (my uncle) on April 20, 1919 from Quernignyrot, France.

“Well, John, I am still in France but soon will leave for Germany where we’ll enter the occupation troops and therefore have to hold our end down until everything is settled. The first peace treaty is supposed to be signed by the 25th. Inst. probably the soldiers will be lessened according to peace negotiations. Just think today it is Easter sunday and no eggs for today. Eggs, milk and sweet deserts you don’t get in the army. Yesterday we had a beautiful day, sunshine all day, mind you. This occurs not often in France. I must tell you that I am teaching school here in the army and therefore am not drilling at present. Four boys from our company got a discharge from the Army and now be home or on their way home.”

Read John August Kiecker’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.



This email was sent on behalf of: World War One Centennial Commission · 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW #123 · Washington, DC 20004