Category Archives: World War One Centennial Commission

NEW PODCAST: The American Worker & WWI

A new podcast from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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The American Worker
And WWI

Episode #140

Steel Worker Strike 1919

There were many stikes in 1919 including 350,000 steel workers

The American Worker & WWI

Host – Theo Mayer

  • The American Worker & WWI – Host | @ 05:15
  • Labor Gains & Labor Losses – Dr. Mark Robbins | @ 10:05
  • A Century in the Making: Article by Traci Slatton- Host | @ 19:20
  • Remembering Veterans – Col. Michael Visconage, USMC (ret.) | @ 30:15
  • The Buzz: Posts from the internet – Host | @ 39:05

More….

Listen To The Podcast NOW

All about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


Join live recording

Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


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NEW PODCAST: FOCUS ON – The Non-Combatants of WWI

A new podcast from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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FOCUS ON:
The Non-Combatants
of WWI

Episode #139

Elsie Janis, USA Signal Corps, AFS

The Doughboys’ Sweetheart, USA Signal Corps film making, and American Field Service ambulances

FOCUS ON: The Non-Combatants
of WWI

Host – Theo Mayer

Unprecedented  Logistics – Joe Johnson | @ 05:00

The US Army Signal Corps – Host | @ 09:15

The Hello Girls – Dr. Elizabeth Cobb | @ 11:30

Medical Support Services & the AFS – Nicole Milano | @ 15:50

The US Postal Service in WWI – Lynn Heidelbaugh | @ 22:15

The Stars & Stripes – Robert Rheid | @ 25:40

The Doughboy’s Sweetheart: Elsie Janis – Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 28:15

Bringing Soldiers to God and God to Soldiers – Dr. John Boyd | @ 32:05

Donuts and Coffee – Patri O’Gan | @ 34:25

More….

Listen To The Podcast NOW

All about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


Join live recording

Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


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NEW PODCAST: War Football and the NFL

An item from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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Doughboy Podcast A

War Football &
the NFL

Episode #138

war football AEF Champs

89th Division photo from the AEF Championship game

War Football & the NFL

Host – Theo Mayer

  • 100 Years Ago: Woodrow Wilson’s last chapter – Host | @ 02:15
  • A Century In The Making: From the Sabin Howard Sculpture Studio
    – Host | @ 12:15
  • Remembering Veterans: Camp Doughboy NYC  #4 – Sept. 14 & 15.
    – Kevin Fitzpatrick | @ 13:45
  • Spotlight on the Media: “War Football: World War I and the Birth of the NFL” – Chris Serb | @ 22:30
  • Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch – Host | @ 34:50

More….

Listen To The Podcast NOW

All about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


Join live recording

Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


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WWI DISPATCH August 27, 2019

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission


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August 27, 2019

Reminder: WWI Dispatch newsletter becomes monthly in September 2019

This issue of the World War I DISPATCH is the last weekly issue of the newsletter. The publication is transitioning to a once-a-month format. The first issue of the new monthly newsletter  will arrive in the middle of September, sent to the same distribution list as the weekly publication has been for the last three years. If you’re a subscriber now, you’ll continue to be one going forward. Not a subscriber yet? Sign up here to receive every issue.


WWI Dog Tag Discovered in France Returned to Soldier’s Family in KY

Clifford Fralick

At first Larry Fralick thought it was a scam call. A man with a French accent on the other end of the line was trying to convince him he found something that belonged to Fralick’s family. Turns out he was telling the truth. “He sent us a picture of the metal detector he used to find it,” Fralick said.Click here to read more about, and watch video of, the story of the mysterious caller who convinced Clifford Fralick’s descendants that the soldier left something behind in France during World War I.


Torrington, CT student returns from World War I archaeological dig in France

Lucas Rodriguez

The expedition “Digging Into History: WWI Trench Restoration” recently returned from three weeks in Seicheprey, France. This innovative experiential learning program brought fifteen Connecticut high school students entering grades 11 and 12 this fall to the site of the first German offensive against American troops, to help restore a section of trench once occupied by Connecticut’s 102d Infantry Regiment. Among the participating students was Lucas Rodriguez of Torrington, who researched a Torrington soldier with the historical society to prepare for the trip. He attends the Connecticut River Academy in East Hartford. Click here to read how, just as the Doughboys formed bonds with the village 100 years ago, the students formed friendships with their French peers as they worked to help restore the historic World War I battlefield site.


Lectures bring World War I exhibition at Knights of Columbus Museum to close

World War I: Beyond the Front Lines poster

Two lectures on September 7 at the Knights of Columbus Museum in New Haven, CT  will be the final events in the museum’s exhibition World War I: Beyond the Front Lines, which concludes September 8. War Within War: The 1918 Influenza in Americawill examine the impact of the so-called “Spanish Flu” on America and the world. The Red Baron & Military Aviation Developments in World War I will examine a key figure in the rise and impact of military aviation spawned by the world conflict. Click here to read more about these two informative lectures, and learn about the award-winning WWI exhibition at the Knights of Columbus Museum.


Minnesota Family Reunited with WWI Dog Tag After More than 80 Years

MN dog tag

Alan Carpenter often looks for buried artifacts in Cobb Cook Park in Hibbing, MN using his metal detector. It’s something he does for fun, but he and his partner Jim Kochevar also return lost items. Last spring, Carpenter made his most important discovery, a World War I dog tag found buried under at least 6 inches of frost. “At first I didn’t know what it was, I thought it was some kind of token or something until I got home and rinsed it off, then I seen the United States Marine Corps on it,” said Carpenter. With Kochevar’s help, this past Memorial Day Carpenter figured out the dog tag belonged to Anton Bernhardt, a World War I veteran, and former Hibbing police officer. Click here to read more and watch video, and find out how the family of the World War I soldier was reunited with the dog tag in August after it was lost for 80 years.


Peach pits, nut shells, and how they helped America win the Great War

Save the Pit

Writing in his “View From Swamptown” column, G. Timothy Cranston, North Kingstown, Rhode Island’s town historian, explores “the seemingly inconsequential peach pit and its equally unimportant companion – the discarded nut shell – to see what historic part they played in World War I.” Click here to read the entire column, and discover how “these common bits of food waste saved many an American Doughboy during the Big War.”


MVPA 2019 100th Anniversary Transcontinental Motor Convoy rolls across Nebraska this week

1918 truck

On Wednesday, August 28, 2019 the Military Vehicle Preservation Association 100th Anniversary Convoy will travel through Kearney, Nebraskaas they continue retracing the original 1919 US Army’s First Transcontinental Motor Convoy route, on the famed Lincoln Highway. Click here to visit the MVPA web site to learn more about the 100th Anniversary Convoy. (Click on the Convoy Button on the top of the page.) Click here to track the convoy’s position.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

WWI Now: Daniel Basta on the “Ghost Fleet” of Mallows Bay

Dan Basta

In August 19th’s edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 136, host Theo Mayer interviewed Daniel J. Basta, Doughboy Foundation board member and accomplished scientist and diver. Mr. Basta sheds light on the Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay, an armada of ships scuttled by the U.S. government in Maryland after the war. Today Mallows Bay is a National Marine Sanctuary, a protected area for wildlife and human recreation–and something that connects contemporary Americans to the Great War. Click here to discover this unique and powerful outdoor destination, and the grueling process undertaken to bring the proposed sanctuary to reality.

War in the Sky:
Mark Wilkins on Pilots and PTSD

Mark Wilkins

In August 12th’s edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 135, (originally aired in Episode 66) we heard from writer and historian Mark Wilkins on the high incidence of shell shock, or PTSD, among WWI pilots. Held up as fearless and daring, these men cracked underneath the extraordinary danger of their occupation. In his research Wilkins uncovered many letters written by the pilots themselves that illustrate the toll aerial combat took on their psyches. Click here to learn more about PTSD and the effect it had on WWI pilots, in their own words.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Doughboy Podcast A

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube.

American Legion post #43 in the 30's

Episode #137
American Legion Post #43: Revitalized and Relevant

Episode #137

Host – Theo Mayer

  • 100 Years Ago: Headlines last week of August 1919
    – Host | @ 02:15
  • Born in the Month of August
    – Dave Kramer | @ 09:05
  • Remembering Veterans: American Legion Post 43 Revitalized
    – Fernando Rivero & Lester Probst | @ 14:45
  • Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter
    – Host | @ 32:55

Doughboy MIA for week of August 26

Private Pietro ‘Peter’ Pacifici.

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday’s MIA this week is Private Pietro ‘Peter’ Pacifici. A native of Morello, Italy, Pietro Pacifici came to America in 1906 and settled in Jefferson County, New York. He was drafted into the service at Watertown, NY, on 22FEB1918 and sent into Company A, 308th Infantry Regiment, 77th Division, with which he trained at Camp Upton Long Island before going overseas in April, 1918. He served all through the campaign in the Vesle Valley that summer with distinction and without incident, even though Company A was frequently under fire and took considerable casualties.

In September, 1918, A/308 was assigned as one of the “point” units leading the 308th into the Argonne Forest, alongside Company D. The summer on the Vesle had been hard on the 308th as a whole, and as they were preparing to enter the Argonne, a large draft of replacements were sent forward for the regiment (1,250 of them), and Company A received their fair share. Among them was a young Private from Washington State named Lee McCollum (who would later go on to write the popular book “History and Rhymes of the Lost Battalion” about his experiences in the Argonne). On the night of September 25th, 1918, as Company A was preparing to move up to the front lines for the jump off the next morning, McCollum found himself assigned to carry a heavy bag of hand grenades. Nearby was a fellow with a strange accent, complaining about the clumsy stretcher that he had been assigned to carry. It was Peter Pacifici. McCollum did not hesitate to offer to exchange loads, feeling the lighter, and far less lethal, stretcher would be a much more welcome burden. Pacifici, used to such loads as the grenades and knowing from experience how welcome they would soon be, readily agreed and the two swapped responsibilities just before the unit moved out.

About a half an hour later, as they were treading forward through the rainy, dark night with artillery flying overhead, McCollum heard an explosion up ahead. Everyone was sure it was return fire from the Germans. Then the cry came back for stretcher bearers forward and McCollum and a pal rushed up. What they found was a rude introduction to the war; Pacifici had tripped and one of the grenades in the bag he had been carrying went off, setting off the rest and blowing him and several others to bits. McCollum carried back one of the wounded.

At the time of the accident, the company was about 1 kilometer north of the hamlet of La Harazee. What remained of Pacifici was buried on 01OCT1918 next to the trench in which he was killed by Chaplain Lockhart of the 53rd Pioneer Infantry. Despite coordinates for the burial being reported at the time and the grave having initially been marked by a cross, when searchers went to locate it after the war, nothing was ever found. Pietro Pacifici remains missing on the battlefield to this day.

Want to help us make an attempt at locating Pacifici using today’s technology? Then consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA at www.usww1cc.org/mia. It takes only a moment and your tax deductible contribution will help us make a difference for Pacifici, as well as helping us make a full accounting of ALL of our US MIA’s from WW1 and keep these lost men from being forgotten. Remember: A man is only missing if he is forgotten.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Mug

White Ceramic WWI Centennial Mug

Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can enjoy your favorite beverage in this 15-ounce ceramic mug and honor the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers.

Proceeds from the sale of this item will help build the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Wentworth Military Academy Doughboy

After the Wentworth Military Academy and College in Missouri closed in 2017, and after a court battle between the bank and the academy, and after academy alumni agree to place the original statue at the Lafayette County Courthouse, a replica of the “Spirit of the American Doughboy” was finally unveiled on Tuesday, August 20 at the Wentworth Military Academy Museum in Lexington, MO. Click here to read more about the long journey to restore the Doughboy to its home at the historic military academy’s heritage center.


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Arthur O. McNitzky

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Arthur O. McNitzky

Submitted by:  Dave Jahn {American Legion, Department Texas, “Arthur O. McNitzky” Post 71, Adjutant}

Arthur O. McNitzky was born around 1890. Arthur McNitzky served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Arthur Othello McNitzky was born on March 28, 1890 in Denton, Texas to Gottfried August McNitzky and Emma Matilda Mentzel McNitzky of Germany. According to family researchers, August McNitzky left Breslau, Germany on 30 June 1874, traveled to Hamburg, then to Hartlepool, England, where he boarded a ship which arrived in Quebec, Canada on 9 July. His line of business was cobbler, but he could not make a living there because of the shoe factories already in existence. He went to Detroit, Chicago, St. Louis, Texas, and Mexico.

His travels cost more than the trip from Germany to Canada; his clothing and tools were stolen, and for a year and seven months he was sick (possibly malaria). He was working in Dallas and on 30 May, 1878, two banks broke in Dallas in one week and he lost $200 in the First National Bank. He said he felt like killing himself. He walked from Dallas to Denton because there was no train. He was one of the first German to come to Denton.

Read Arthur O. McNitzky’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


NEW PODCAST: American Legion Post #43: Revitalized & Relevant!

A new podcast from the World War One Centennial Commission.


View as a webpage

Doughboy Podcast A

American Legion Post #43: Revitalized & Relevant!

Episode #137

American Legion post #43 in the 30's

The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay

American Legion Post #43
Revitalized & Relevant

Host – Theo Mayer

  • 100 Years Ago: Headlines last week of August 1919 – Host | @ 02:15
  • Born in the Month of August- Dave Kramer | @ 09:05
  • Remembering Veterans: American Legion Post 43 Revitalized –
    Fernando Rivero & Lester Probst | @ 14:45
  • Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter – Host | @ 32:55

More….

Listen To The Podcast NOW

All about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


Join live recording

Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


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WWI DISPATCH August 20, 2019

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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August 20, 2019

WWI Dispatch newsletter becomes monthly publication in September 2019

Beginning in September, this weekly World War I DISPATCH newsletter will transition to a once-a-month publication format. The first new monthly issue will arrive in the middle of September, sent to the same distribution list as the weekly publication has been for the last three years. If you’re a subscriber now, you’ll continue to be one going forward.


A hero of the Great War: North Carolina A&T instructor Robert Campbell

Robert Campbell

At N.C. A&T, like at most universities, the buildings are named for people who played important roles on campus. The original main building is named for a past A&T president. So, too, are the library, the current administration building and four academic buildings. And then there’s Campbell Hall, home of A&T’s ROTC programs since 1955. The building’s namesake, Robert Campbell, served in World War I, but that is only the beginning of his amazing story.  Click here to read more about how Campbell was ” the definition of an officer and a gentleman” and an inspiration to many with his life and service.


Middleboro, MA town square renamed to keep promise to World War I soldier

Glass Square sign

The somewhat disorienting five-way intersection located at the top of Center Street in downtown Middleboro, MA, known locally as Everett Square, is due to be redesigned in 2020, but before that, Everett Square had to be renamed, or better yet, reestablished, as John F. Glass, Jr. Square, as it was always supposed to be. Click here to read the entire story of how members of American Legion Post 64 and other local veterans fought a decade-long campaign to have the square rededicated in keeping with a 1929 Town Meeting vote which established the spot as Glass Square, in honor of the last serviceman from Middleboro to be killed in action in World War I.


100th Anniversary Transcontinental Motor Convoy reaches Iowa this week

MVPA 1918 staff car

Retired Army Sgt. Mark Ounan drives his restored 1918 Army staff car (left) as the Military Vehicle Preservation Association’s convoy of historic military vehicles made its way through northwest Ohio. Ounan noted that “Five of these cars went on the original convoy in 1919, and Eisenhower was on that trip with the Army so he probably rode in one just like it.” The convoy honoring the 1919 US Army’s Transcontinental Motor Convoy reaches Iowa this week, heading west toward San Francisco. Click here to read more about the Clinton, IA stop, and how to track the convoy’s position on its way to the West Coast.


The Definition of a ‘Boom’ Town in WWI

NItro, WV

The U.S. government put its own version of the Big Bang Theory into action during 1917 when it established the town of Nitro, West Virginia, to manufacture nitrocellulose (also known as “guncotton,” because of its explosive characteristics) to support the war effort in WWI. Click here to read more about how the government wanted the residents and plant employees there (like those pictured at left) to do a bang up job of supplying explosives to the U.S. armed forces, but also hoped that living and working in Nitro didn’t end up being too much of a blast.


WWI soldier’s grave finally gets marker

Robison grave marker

Denny Robison wasn’t sure why the grave of his grandfather — a World War I veteran — was unmarked for 45 years. Now, together with his wife, Carolyn Robison, and the Pottawattamie County, IA Veterans Affairs office, that has been corrected. Robison figured it was just an oversight that his grandfather — WWI U.S. Army veteran Dan Robison — remained buried in an unmarked grave, and that oversight was buried with time. Click here to read more about how teamworkhelped get the World War I veteran’s grave properly marked at Walnut Hill Cemetery.


Group proposes moving Springfield, MO World War I memorial after vandalism

Springfield, MO memorial

The Springfield, MO World War I memorial may soon be moved from its longtime home in Grant Beach Park following an act of vandalism in April this year. The monument was defaced when multiple people or a vehicle pushed over the top portion of the obelisk.  It wasn’t damaged, but park board spokeswoman Jenny Edwards said that was the second time in her seven years of working with the board that the monument had been pushed over.  Click here to read more about the move to a new and more secure location in Springfield for the monument erected in 1924.


2019 marks 101 years since death of pioneering aviator Louis Bennett Jr.

Louis Bennett Jr.

August 24 will mark the 101st anniversary of Louis Bennett Jr.’s death during WWI. Bennett, Jr. served in the Royal Air Force in the United Kingdom. At the time of his death Bennett had flown 25 maneuvers against the Germans. He formed the West Virginia Flying Corps, which was commissioned by then WV Governor Cornwell on July 26, 1917. The U.S. Army, however, refused to accept the corps, which led Bennett Jr. to enter flight school with the British Royal Air Force in Canada. Click here to read more about Bennett’s unfortunate death in combat, and how the aviator is now honored by memorials in three nations.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

War in the Sky: Medal of Honor Recipient Erwin Bleckley 

Erwin Bleckley

In August 12th’s edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 135, we reprised an earlier interview about a heroic but largely unknown American serviceman. As the Lost Battalion fought for their lives in the fall of 1918, a group of Airmen risked their lives to relocate and resupply them–the first such mission in American military history–including 2nd Lieutenant Erwin Bleckley. Click here to read his remarkable story, as told by historian Lieutenant Colonel Doug Jacobs, U.S. Army (Ret.), former command historian and curator for the Kansas National Guard Museum.

War Tech: The Interrupter Gear

Anthony Fokker

From August 12th’s edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 135 (originally aired in Episode 68): At the beginning of World War I the airplane had yet to realize its lethal potential as a weapon of war. One major hindrance to aerial combat was the difficulty of firing a forward-mounted machine gun on a propeller plane without destroying the propeller itself. Then in 1915, a Dutch engineer named Anthony Fokker changed the world with his revolutionary “Interrupter Gear.” Click here to learn more about this deadly invention by which German planes would dominate combat in the WWI skies until mid-1916.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Doughboy Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New – Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay

Episode #136
Highlights: The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay.

Host – Theo Mayer

100 Years Ago: The Turning Tide – August 1918 – Host | @ 02:10

100 Years Ago: The Aftermath – August 1919 – Host | @ 07:20

Remembering Veterans: The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay –
Daniel J. Basta | @ 09:25

Commission News | @ 22:05

Spotlight on the Media: “Over There with Private Graham” –
Steve Badgley, Bruce Jarvis | @ 24:55

Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch – Host | @ 35:55

“Making History”: The Hello Girls Cast Album -Music Snippet | @ 42:55


Doughboy MIA for week of August 20

Doughboy MIA

Our MIA this week is a report. As we have been poring over the information we collected from the NPRC a couple of weeks ago, we have zeroed in on several targets.

First, we are working on the cases of our missing from the Russian expedition of 1918 – 1921 (the ‘Polar Bears’). In this we have approached the Polar Bear Association in Michigan for assistance, as their expertise in this theater is the first and foremost in the world. The expedition to Russia was a confusing and difficult affair and in order to insure accuracy in our determinations, we believe that the Association’s assistance will be a deciding factor. There is A LOT of information to sift through and we are painstakingly moving forward. News will be forthcoming.

Second, we are working on a small group of men buried together in July, 1918 from the 2nd Engineers during the Soissons battle who were never recovered. However, we were approached by an individual whose grandfather was one who assisted in the burials and left behind his memories of the event and his impressions. There is a possibility this information may make a difference in making a determination, or even an investigation with an eye toward a recovery effort. Much data has been gathered already, and once we have combed through it, we have two 2nd Division experts who will be assisting with additional advice. Stay tuned!

Besides those investigations, we continue working a case of a man from Montana whose name remains in doubt, and investigating the Doughboy MIA’s from Oregon at the request of their highway commission, who are dedicating a stretch of highway in honor of the state’s POW’s/MIA’s. So you can see we have many irons in the fire. And it is with that in mind that we will be forced to delay the new newsletter we have planned, ‘The Silent Sentinel’, until further notice. But fear not, it will be worth the wait, we assure you!

Lastly, do you believe you possess skills we could use here at Doughboy MIA and would you like to volunteer to help? Drop us a line and we’ll see what we can do together. Otherwise, your donations make all the difference – as you can see by the above, ONE trip to the NPRC got us this far. How far could we still go? Only time and generous donations will tell!  Visit the website at www.ww1cc.org/mia to give today. Your tax deductible donations DO make a difference and know that every dollar IS appreciated!

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget Book Cover

“Lest We Forget: The Great War”

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library 

As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned―including posters from nations involved in the conflict―and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force. Proceeds from the sale of this book help fund the new National WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


French cave wall carving detail

A team from Wheaton College in Norton, MA, led by Professor of Computer Science Mark Leblanc, recently returned from two days in the caves at Braye-en-Laonnois, France after capturing 3D data of the cave etchings left there by American soldiers in World War I, like those in the image above. Click here to learn how 21st Century technology is being used to capture, preserve, reproduce, and disseminate these 100 year-old memoirs of American soldiers during the Great War.


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George Franklin Rutledge

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

George Franklin Rutledge

Submitted by: Glenn Perry {great nephew}

George Franklin Rutledge was born around 1891. George Rutledge served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

George Franklin Rutledge was drafted on 30 Nov, 1917 and sent to Camp Pike in Arkansas for training. Among the first recruits to be trained there, he slept in tents until barracks were built. On 8 May, 1918, his unit departed for France from Hoboken, New Jersey on troop ship “America.” He was a member of Co M, 23rd Infantry of the U S Army 2nd Div.

By June 5, 1918, the 2nd Division’s lines had been rushed to the front and finally stabilized after several hectic days of relief and defense during the waning hours of the Aisne Defensive. In that time, the infantry and machine gun units of the division had been thrown into the line where needed as the Germans advanced and as the French slowly withdrew, fighting for every town and wood. Two battalions of the 23rd Infantry took over the line from an area named Triangle to Le Thiolet. The front was a mess of wheat fields, small towns, and woodlots, with parallel ridges facing each other. It was virgin territory, the ground as-yet unscarred by trenchlines and shell holes.

The 2nd Division had been given two missions: capture the height of Bois de Belleau and the nearby town of Vaux. The height was in the sector of the Marine Brigade while Vaux lay far to the right, nearly on the dividing line between the French and the 2nd Division. the 1st and 3rd Battalions of the 23rd Infantry advanced from their positions to come just south of the road leading from Bouresches to Vaux. About two hours after advancing, the 3rd Battalion was hit with a heavy counterattack in the vicinity of Cote 192, where they suffered extreme losses. Just after midnight, both battalions were given the order to withdraw to their starting positions. They were to hold this front line position aggressively patrolling the front, sending out raids to keep the enemy off balance, digging in, and enduring tremendous enemy artillery shelling, including heavy mustard gas bombardment.

Read George Franklin Rutledge’s entire Story of Service here.

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NEW PODCAST: The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay Ep.#136

A new podcast from the World War One Centennial Commission.


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Doughboy Podcast A

The Ghost Fleet of
Mallows Bay

Episode #136

The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay

The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay

The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay

Host – Theo Mayer

  • 100 Years Ago: The Turning Tide – August 1918 – Host | @ 02:10
  • 100 Years Ago: The Aftermath – August 1919 – Host | @ 07:20
  • Remembering Veterans: The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay –
    Daniel J. Basta | @ 09:25
  • Commission News | @ 22:05
  • Spotlight on the Media: “Over There with Private Graham” –
    Steve Badgley, Bruce Jarvis | @ 24:55
  • Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch – Host | @ 35:55
  • “Making History”: The Hello Girls Cast Album -Music Snippet | @ 42:55

More….

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