Tag Archives: Legion Magazine

Photo essay: Warbirds and parachutists

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Stephen J thorne

Stephen J. Thorne

Photo essay: Warbirds and parachutists

STORY BY STEPHEN J. THORNE

Flight is a beautiful thing, whether by bird’s wing or human hands.

They are different, to be sure.

The power and majesty of the mighty eagle, the agility and speed of the osprey, the silence and efficiency of the the great grey have been a central focus of my photography beyond work, a diversion from the rigours of daily life.

Aviation, on the other hand, has been a lifelong interest. My dad was air force during the Second World War, and so I was raised on stories of the Hurricane and Spitfire, the P-51 Mustang and the P-47 Thunderbolt, the Lancaster and the B-17.

I worked a year after high school flying with Vietnam-era helicopter pilots on oil exploration crews all across northwestern Alberta, northern British Columbia and the Arctic.

 

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The Royals: The fight to rule Canada

The Canadian Press/Patrick Doyle

A Bayonet is all PO2 James Leith needed to dismantle bombs in Afghanistan

STORY BY SHARON ADAMS

On Sept. 28, 2006, using only his bayonet, Petty Officer 2nd class James Leith dismantled a bomb in Afghanistan.

“A good dose of fear keeps you sharp,” the navy explosives expert said in an interview with Darlene Blakely of Lookout, the Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt newspaper, after the announcement that his actions had earned the Star of Courage.

On his first mission to Afghanistan, serving alongside 2 Combat Engineer Regiment, Leith was on his regular morning duty clearing supply routes west of Kandahar City, driving a Bison armoured vehicle packed with the tools of his trade­, including robots and X-ray equipment.

The Bison hit an improvised explosive device (IED) and was propelled more than nine metres through the air.

 

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Safe Step Walk In Tubs

At Pocketpills, we bring the pharmacy to you. Through our easy-to-use app and website, you can fill prescriptions, order vitamins, and consult with pharmacists—all from the comfort of home. As a member of The Legion, you’ll receive exclusive benefits when you sign up! Click the link below to see offers in your area, or call 1-855-950-7225 and mention that you are a Legion member.

Memorials mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Stephen J thorne

Stephen J Thorne

Memorials mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II

STORY BY STEPHEN J. THORNE

She was born April 21, 1926, Princess Elizabeth of York and, as events would have it, she would become heir to the British throne.

She became Queen Elizabeth II on Feb. 6, 1952, succeeding her father, King George VI, and declaring that “my whole life whether it be long or short shall be devoted to your service and the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong.”

 

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The Royals: The fight to rule Canada

CWM

The Royal Canadian Engineers and Operation Berlin

STORY BY SHARON ADAMS

Operation Market Garden was a plan to create a route for an Allied invasion of northern Germany by capturing key bridges over the Rhine and its tributaries in September 1944.

The bridge at Arnhem, Netherlands, on the lower Rhine, was key to the plan. At this crossing, the Allies planned to push south into the Ruhr valley, Germany’s industrial heartland, choking off production of materiel and ending the war before 1945.

 

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Safe Step Walk In Tubs

We are THRILLED to be a part of the Legion Member Benefits Program and can’t wait to assist you with your future travel plans! As a Royal Canadian Legion member, you will enjoy exclusive pricing, upgrades and special amenities on a wide selection of vacation packages, cruises and tours. You will be able to take advantage of exciting promotions negotiated just for Legion Members, exclusive perks and extras from our preferred suppliers, and access to custom group departures specific to Legion Members.

Learn more: https://bstvacations.ca/royal-canadian-legion/

Call us at 1-800-561-4275

Divers find long-lost WW II bomber in Newfoundland Lake

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Stephen J thorne

Maxwel Hohn

Divers find long-lost WW II bomber in Newfoundland Lake

STORY BY STEPHEN J. THORNE

On Sept. 4, 1943, Wing Commander John M. Young of the Royal Canadian Air Force was on the yoke taking off from his base in Gander, Nfld., with three crew aboard when an engine on his Liberator 589D is believed to have failed.

The B-24 aircraft of Young’s No. 10 Squadron made a slow turn and barrel-rolled into Gander Lake. No one survived. After a brief, aborted recovery effort, it was the last anyone saw of Liberator 589D for 79 years.

 

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5 Volume Collection

CWM

A brief history of Canada and the Victoria Cross

STORY BY SHARON ADAMS

Herbert Taylor Reader, of Perth, Ont., decided in 1850 to follow in his father’s footsteps, Colonel George Hume Reade, a staff surgeon with the Leeds Militia in Upper Canada, who was killed in the Crimean War.

After completing his medical education in Quebec and Ireland, Reade joined the 61st Regiment of Foot in the British Army in 1850 as an assistant surgeon. It was the first step in a distinguished 36-year military career that would lead him to the company of royalty.

 

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Legion Magazine

A final salute to Queen Elizabeth II,

1926-2022

STORY BY TOM MACGREGOR

“For many of us, we have only ever known one Queen,” said Governor General Mary Simon after the death of Queen Elizabeth II at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on Sept. 8. She had been the Queen of Canada for 70 years.

“Queen Elizabeth II was a constant presence in our lives,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. “Time and again, Her Majesty marked Canada’s modern history. Over the course of 70 years and 23 royal tours, [she] saw this country from coast to coast to coast and was there for our major, historical milestones.”

 

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Allen Lane

Exclusive excerpt: Lifesavers and Body Snatchers

STORY BY TOM MACGREGOR

It’s been long known that the First World War helped push medicine and treatment options forward, but historian Tim Cook has uncovered a disturbing reality. Doctors were removing body parts from slain soldiers without consent and sending them back to Canada to be studied and put on display.

In his new book, Lifesavers and Body Snatchers: Medical Care and the Struggle for Survival in the Great War, Cook tells the untold history and the secret legacy of medicine at war. His deep archival research and use of unpublished letters make for gripping writing. Read an excerpt from Cooks book now.

 

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Safe Step Walk In Tubs