Tag Archives: Legion Magazine

A war of bread and potatoes

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Military Milestones
A war of bread and potatoes

A war of bread and potatoes

Story by Sharon Adams

When fighting drew near to the small village of Montigny-en-Ostrevent, France, near the end of the First World War, civilians wisely evacuated.

When they returned home, many found their houses and cottages occupied by Canadian liberators—squatters who were nonetheless warmly welcomed.

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Puzzle Packs!
Front Lines
CP bulletin, Oct. 16, 1942: U-boat sinks SS Caribou in Cabot Strait

CP bulletin, Oct. 16, 1942: U-boat sinks
SS Caribou in Cabot Strait

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

To many Canadians and Newfoundlanders alike, the sinking of SS Caribou and the death of 137 people were the clearest sign to date that the war had actually arrived on the home front. Many historians cite it as Canada’s most significant sinking in near-shore waters of the Second World War.

Written by Canadian Press staff writer Bob Daldorph in an age when agency news was actually disseminated by telephone cables (or wires—hence, the wire service), the story was sent in bite-sized takes, the first of which is the single-sentence bulletin sent at 10:50 p.m.

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E-Books now available!
This week in history
This week in history

October 15-17, 1970

Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau proclaims the War Measures Act and the Canadian Army is ordered into Montreal, where hundreds are arrested and thousands searched before the body of Quebec Labour Minister Pierre Laporte is discovered Oct. 17.

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HearingLife and Royal Canadian Legion
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Legion Magazine

Filmmaker Garth Pritchard: The good fight

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Front Lines
Filmmaker Garth Pritchard: The good fight

Filmmaker Garth Pritchard: The good fight

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

“F/8 and be there” has been Garth Pritchard’s camera-ready mantra over more than 50 years as a journalist, rancher and raconteur. And the robust Alberta-based filmmaker has been all over the world with Canadian troops, from Africa and Burma to Afghanistan and the Balkans.

Beloved by soldiers from one end of Canada to the other, Garth made it his life’s mission to tell their stories. Now, as the outspoken 75-year-old struggles to overcome the debilitating physical legacy of that quest, the Canadian War Museum has announced it has acquired the bulk of his work, a legacy for all Canadians.

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Celebrating Canada Series - O Canada Journal
Military Milestones
The law reaches Fort Whoop-Up

The law reaches Fort Whoop-Up

Story by Sharon Adams

In 1873, the people of what is now southern Alberta and Saskatchewan had a serious complaint. With no police force, traders and outlaws who had fled prohibition in the United States had established a well-defended fort where they traded buffalo robes and sold U.S. whiskey, largely to First Nations people, and spread criminal chaos throughout the countryside.

Even though it was in Canadian territory, an American flag was said to fly over Fort Whoop-Up, near modern-day Lethbridge. Violence and criminal activity seeped from this criminal cul-de-sac into surrounding territory.

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Pocket Pal 2020
This week in history
This week in history

October 9, 1958

The last CL-13 Sabre jet rolls off the assembly line at Canadair for delivery to the German air force.

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Revera Living
Legion Magazine

Battle of the Atlantic video narrated by Alan Doyle nominated for 2019 Canadian Online Publishing Award

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Alan Doyle Narrates Military Moments | Battle of the Atlantic

Battle of the Atlantic video narrated by Alan Doyle nominated for 2019 Canadian Online Publishing Award

Canvet Publications Ltd. has been named a finalist in the 2019 Canadian Online Publishing Awards for Best Video Content for the Military Moments video Battle of the Atlantic narrated by Alan Doyle.

The video—narrated by Canadian musician and artist Alan Doyle of Great Big Sea—takes us back to Sept. 3, 1939, when a German U-boat torpedoed the ocean liner SS Athenia just hours after Britain had declared war on Germany. The Battle of the Atlantic was Canada’s longest campaign of the Second World War.

Other finalists in this category include Huffington Post Canada, Huffington Post Quebec, Canada’s History Magazine and Hakai Magazine. The 2019 Canadian Online Publishing Awards take place in Toronto in November.


WATCH VIDEO

Legion Magazine

HMCS Iroquois damaged in Korea

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Military Milestones
HMCS Iroquois damaged in Korea

HMCS Iroquois damaged in Korea

Story by Sharon Adams

HMCS Iroquois was on its first tour of duty in Korea, under frequent fire as it patrolled the east coast, itself frequently firing on North Korean rail lines.

A tunnel near Songjin on the main rail line carrying war supplies from Russia to North Korea was frequently shelled and under constant repair. It was the target for about two hours on Oct. 2, 1952, as Iroquois worked to keep repair crews from bringing the line back into operation.

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Yes I am from Canada Calendar and Notepad
Front Lines
Hitler, Raeder, and the demise of the Kriegsmarine

Hitler, Raeder, and the
demise of the Kriegsmarine

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

Given his obsessive, hands-on leadership, intolerance of failure, and penchant for brutal punishment, it had to be more than a little disconcerting when an infuriated Adolf Hitler learned details of a major sea battle from a British news agency hours before his own admirals told him about it.

Der Führer was so angry that he scrapped the German high-seas fleet in the midst of the Second World War. Grand Admiral Erich Raeder, who had commanded the Kriegsmarine for 14 years, would surrender his post to Admiral Karl Dönitz, head of Germany’s vaunted U-boat fleet.

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Liberation of the Netherlands Poster
This week in history
This week in history

October 2-3, 1944

First Canadian Army begins its hard slog to clear the
Scheldt Estuary in an effort to open the port of Antwerp.

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Carlson Wagonlit Travel
Legion Magazine