Tag Archives: Legion Magazine

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier turns 20

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Front Lines
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier turns 20

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier turns 20

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

More than 20 years ago, The Royal Canadian Legion set out to honour some 115,000 Canadians who made the ultimate sacrifice in two world wars, Korea, South Africa and Afghanistan. The effort culminated in a ceremony in France, where the remains of an unknown Canadian soldier killed at Vimy Ridge in 1917 were exhumed from his grave and brought home to Canada.

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Military Milestones
Jitter and snatch patrols in Korea

Canadian pilots respond to crisis in Kosovo

Story by Sharon Adams

On June 2, 1999, intense diplomatic negotiations began in the Balkans, bringing to an end 78 days of military bombing in Kosovo, in which Royal Canadian Air Force pilots took part.

In 1989, Serbian president Slobodan Milošević repealed constitutional autonomy of the province of Kosovo; Kosovo’s ethnic Albanians, who had long suffered persecution by Serbs, began protests that grew increasingly violent throughout the civil war marking the breakup of Yugoslavia.

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Ten under $10 - Pick your own Volume Set!
This week in history
This week in history

June 6, 1944

About 450 Canadians are among the Allied paratroopers
who land behind German coastal defences on D-Day.

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Medipac Travel Insurance
Legion Magazine

Knights of the air

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Military Milestones
Fighting for Fort George

Fighting for Fort George

Story by Sharon Adams

At the turn of the 19th century, the British were concerned about a balance of power where British territory met American on the banks of the Niagara River.

The British wanted a fort on the west side of the Niagara River, in what today is Niagara-on-the-Lake, to counterbalance Fort Niagara on the east bank and safeguard shipping on the river to Upper Canada.

Fort George was completed in 1802; its strategic importance recognized as war clouds gathered. It became headquarters for the British army during the War of 1812.

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Ten under $10 - Pick your own Volume Set!
Front Lines
Knights of the air

Knights of the air

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

There are few rivals in war who have shared the mutual regard and respect, even camaraderie, as did those who flew fighter planes during the two world wars.

Theirs was a singular experience, the scale and intimacy of which were unique in the annals of conflict, even aviation, before or since.

The chivalric tradition among flyers began during the First World War. Known as Knights of the Air, they blazed trails in the skies in canvas-and-wood airplanes with rudimentary instrumentation, sans parachutes. They fought mano a mano, skill to skill, sometimes just metres apart.

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Front Lines Podcast
This week in history
This week in history

May 27, 1941

The German warship Bismarck is sunk.

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Arbor Alliance
Legion Magazine

Afghanistan and the AK-47

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Front Lines
Afghanistan and the AK-47

Afghanistan and the AK-47

Story and photogtaphy by Stephen J. Thorne

With more than 75 million estimated to be in circulation, the Avtomat Kalashnikova, or AK-47 (for the year Mikhail Kalashnikov completed his work), is the most popular and most copied weapon in the world. Light, simple, reliable and stable, the AK-47 has for decades been the weapon of choice among revolutionaries, insurgents, terrorists and resistance fighters in virtually every corner of the globe. Easy to maintain and easy to use, it is ideal for child soldiers and marginally trained fighters, though its accuracy leaves something to be desired. In Afghanistan, the AK-47 is ubiquitous, and every one has a story. And while journalists don’t carry weapons, they have stories too. Here are mine.

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Cash Cards are back!
Military Milestones
Jitter and snatch patrols in Korea

Jitter and snatch patrols in Korea

Story by Sharon Adams

In the spring of 1952, the Allies in Korea were starving for intelligence on Chinese forces, which went to ground (and underground) between attacks. Two new strategies were employed, one to get enemy soldiers to give away their positions, and the other to capture prisoners for interrogation. The troops labelled them jitter and snatch patrols.

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This week in history
This week in history

May 20-21, 1952

One dies and four are wounded as the Princess Patricia’s
Canadian Light Infantry conducts a night raid in Korea.

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Iris Advantage
Legion Magazine

Vote for the next cover of Legion Magazine!

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Military Milestones
The Princess Patricias hold the line

The Princess Patricias hold the line

Story by Sharon Adams

The first Battle of Ypres in 1914, during Germany’s race to the sea at the start of the First World War, created an eight-kilometre bulge in the front northeast of Ypres, Belgium. Within this salient, Allied lines were surrounded on three sides by German-held territory.

The salient was a thorn the Germans intended to remove from their side, fighting four battles between April 22 and May 13, 1915, together known as the Second Battle of Ypres.

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Choose our cover for the July/August 2020 issue of Legion Magazine!

Choose our cover for the next issue of Legion Magazine!

Among its many features, the July/August 2020 issue of Legion Magazine will explore the aftermath of a destroyed Europe and how its people chose to remember, rebuild and recover. Help choose our cover! Cast your vote, give us your opinion and share with your friends on social media!

VOTE HERE

Front Lines
Searching Tora Bora

German U-boat crews abandoned
plans to scuttle, surrender instead

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

It was a cloudy afternoon on May 13, 1945, when four Canadian navy ships intercepted U-889 some 250 kilometres southeast of Cape Race, N.L. The patrol aircraft that discovered the steaming German submarine circled overhead.

The war had been over less than a week and all German U-boats had been ordered to cease offensive operations, even before the surrender was formalized.

Almost three-quarters of the Unterseeboot crews had died during the war—an unheard of 28,000 of 40,000 men, many of whom fell victim to technologies that outpaced their own. The surrender order no doubt came as bittersweet relief to many in a service that had diminished from primarily volunteer to increasingly pressed crews.

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The seizing of Europe’s bells
This week in history
This week in history

May 13, 1945

German submarine U-889 surrenders to the Royal Canadian Navy near Shelburne, N.S.

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Chip Mortgage - Home Equity
Legion Magazine