WWI DISPATCH June 18, 2019

A newsletter from the World War One Centennial Commission.


View this in your browser

Dispatch header 800 - 061217

June 18, 2019


One Hundred Years of the Los Angeles Victory Memorial Grove: Flag Day 2019

Victory Memorial Grove Los Angeles

“If one had taken a short hike on Flag Day in Elysian Park in Los Angeles on the one hundredth anniversary of the dedication of the park and passed by the World War One monument there, your heart surely would have taken a patriotic beat at what you witnessed. A proud display by a striking color-guard, a moving rendition of our National Anthem, and heroic tales of bravery in the field all added to the remarkable feeling of dignity and gratification at being an American.” So writes Bill Betten, California WW1 Centennial Task Force Co-Director, of the ceremony in Los Angeles last week.  Click here to read Bill’s entire report on the Centennial event in Los Angeles.


“It is we who have had the privilege of talking to survivors of the First World War that must now keep the memory of the Great War alive.”

Attila Szalay Berzeviczy

An interesting new World War I-themed photo book project will come out later this year. The 640-page book, entitled “„In the Centennial Footsteps of the Great War“, the book will be a tribute to the centennial of the First World War, done through contemporary imagery. We spoke to the book project’s author, Attila Szalay-Berzeviczy, about the book’s photography, and the book’s aims. Attila has an interesting background — he is an economist, a photographer, the founder of Historical Military Photos Ltd, and the former President of the Budapest Stock Exchange. Attila took some time to talk to us about his amazing World War I project, and share some of the incredible photography featured in the volume.


“Never Forget Garden” initiative represents America’s sacred duty to remember veterans

Never Forget Garden

The Centennial Commission has been partners and friends with a number of organizations over the years. Among them is a very special group — the Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. This group has a strong focus — to make certain that the individuals that made the ultimate sacrifice of their life for our freedom are not forgotten, and that the general public understands this price of freedom. The members of the Society are preparing for the Centennial of the arrival of the first Unknown at Arlington National Cemetery. To help us all mark this special anniversary, Society members have developed a new initiative to help us to remember the service of our veterans, and the memory of our fallen. We were able to talk with the Project Director, Richard Azzaro, about the project.


World War I home front featured at Lindbergh site for one more summer

Families on the WW1 Home Front Tour

Over the last several summers, visitors to the Charles Lindbergh Historical Site have had the chance to take a look into the lives of people on the home front of World War I, thanks to volunteers and staff reenacting life on the Lindbergh property at the time. That will come to an end after this summer. In its final year, visitors can come enjoy the program Saturday July 6, July 20, Aug. 3, Aug. 17 and Aug. 31. Through a tour of the Lindbergh home, visitors learn  some of the things people went through during the war on the Home Front. Click here to read more about the World War I programming at the Charles Lindbergh Historical Site in Minnesota this summer.


Cathedral Of The Rockies Music Director Takes World War I Tribute To Belgium

Paul Aitken

20 years ago, Cathedral of the Rockies music director Paul Aitken composed a choral piece that captures the hope and despair felt by World War I soldiers on the fields of Flanders in Belgium. This month, Aitken will travel to Flanders to conduct a performance of “Flanders Fields” on June 23. He recently joined Idaho Matters to talk about the importance of the piece and performing it at the site of its inspiration.  Click here to listen to the PBS interview, and watch a video of the choral performance.


Reading, PA Rededicates One of the Nation’s Oldest World War I Memorials

Reading WWI Memorial

The Great War ended on Armistice Day in November 1918; by June 8, 1919, the city of Reading, PA was dedicating a memorial to the 224 soldiers from there and surrounding communities. Reading rededicated its World War I ‘Doughboy’ Monument during a ceremony Saturday, June 8, the 100th anniversary of its original dedication. Click here to read more about the centennial rededication, including the unique story of the Doughboy sculpture atop the memorial structure.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans: Hawaii WWI Centennial Task Force Chairman Colonel Arthur Tulak on the upcoming Honolulu WWI Symposium 

Colonel Arthur Trulak

In June 7th’s edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 126, host Theo Mayer interviewed Colonel Arthur Tulak, Chairman of the Hawaii World War I Centennial Task Force. Colonel Tulak discusses Hawaii’s role in the First World War, the activities of the Task Force, and an upcoming academic symposium in Honolulu. Click here to read the entire transcript of this podcast interview.

Commission News: Raising Money for the National WWI Memorial with Director of Development Phil Mazzara 

Phil Mazzara

In May 31st’s edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 125, host Theo Mayer spoke with Phil Mazarra, Director of Development and the Chief Fundraiser for the National World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. Read on to learn more about the Mr. Mazarra’s experience in the fundraising field, and the ongoing effort to raise enough money for the National Memorial- what he calls “the most meaningful project he’s ever raised money for.” Click here to learn more about Phil, and the status of fundraising for the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC

An Interview with Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission Executive Director Rebecca Kleefisch

Kleefisch

In May 31st’s edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 125, host Theo Mayer spoke with Rebecca Kleefisch about the background, mission, and plans for the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission, of which she is the Executive Director. Click here to read a transcript of the interview, and learn more about to tell us about the Commission, the mission, and the plans for the centennial commemoration of the passage of the 19th Amendment.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New – Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Stars & Stripes last WWI issue

Episode #127
Highlights: Stars and Stripes

Aftermath of WWI Perspective – Host | @ 02:25

Stars And Stripes Last WWI Issue – Host | @ 04:15

Insights into Stripes – Robert H. Reid | @ 06:45

Preserving the Stripes’ Legacy – Laura Meyer & Sue Mayo | @ 10:05

Germany in Shock at Peace Treaty – Mike Shuster | @ 13:55

War Memoirs From WWI: “John Lucy” – Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 18:15

WWI Genealogy Research Guide Update – Host | @ 23:50

American POWs in WWI – Col Greg Eanes, (USAF ret.) | @ 25:30

Mobile WWI Museum Update – Keith Colley | @ 32:20

Dispatch Highlights – Host | @ 40:15


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

WWrite Tripleheader!

This week, WWrite features three new posts in preparation for ending the blog series in June. National Book Award winner, Phil Klay, will write the last post next week, but before we say this final, exciting goodbye, we are honored to present the following authors this week:

1. They Shall Not Grow Old – and Neither Have We
By Teresa Fazio

This past January, amid headlines of US negotiations with the Taliban and lingering Syrian ISIL strongholds, former Marine Officer and award-winning freelance writer, Teresa Fazio, escaped internet news for an afternoon of 3D immersion in They Shall Not Grow Old, by Peter Jackson. But when she forked over twenty bucks for a ticket, she didn’t know that what would strike her even harder than this impressive technical reconstruction was the similarity of the youthful soldiers to my Marines in Iraq in 2004. Don’t miss “They Shall Not Grow Old – and Neither Have We,” by Teresa Fazio this week at WWrite!

2. Movies That Made Me – A Farewell to Arms
By Jenny Pacanowski

Often people ask former Army medic, Jenny Pacanowski, at her poetry events if she started writing before her deployment to Iraq in 2004 or before. She answers that it was watching old movies on her parent’s couch, that made her a poet. This week, she shares inspiration gained from the 1957 version of Hemingway’s iconic WWI novel, A Farewell to Arms. While the time and circumstances were different, Hemingway’s tale from almost100 years ago resonates with her experience as a medic in Iraq. Read Movies That Made Me – A Farewell to Arms by Jenny Pacanowski at WWrite this week!

3. When the War Didn’t End
By Rob Bokkon

Every WWI aficionado knows the date and the hour. 11AM, Paris time, November 11, 1918. The Armistice and the end of the Great War. The world was free from tyranny. Safe for democracy, in the words of President Woodrow Wilson. As writer Rob Bokkon, this week’s third WWrite contributor attests, however, on the global scale, tragic stories abound about how the war didn’t end on November 11, 1918. Part of these unknown stories involve American troops fighting the Bolsheviks in the nascent Soviet Union, and the lynching of African-American veterans in the South, often by their own brothers in arms. Read Bokkon’s post, When the War Didn’t End, to understand why he thinks these stories are just as much a part of the Great War narrative as the tales of heroism at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

General George S. Patton is best known for his leadership in WW2, but in WW1, he served with the US Tank Corps.

Not many people know that Patton was also an enthusiastic writer of poetry: his poem dedicated to the tanks he commanded is one of his quirkier literary efforts.


Doughboy MIA for week of June 17

Earl Cliett

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday’s MIA this week is Private Earl Cliett. Born in 1891 at Cairo, Georgia, Earl I. Cliett was the son of Lee and Amanda Cliett, farmers by trade, and one of four children. He was living in the town of Reno, in Grady County, Georgia when he enlisted in the Regular Army at Fort Thomas, Kentucky on 3 April, 1917; just days before President Wilson declared war on Germany. He was immediately assigned to Company I, 28th Infantry. He sailed on 14 June aboard the troop ship Tenedores, bound for France – one of the first contingent of American soldiers to arrive ‘Over There’, where the 28th Infantry would be an integral unit of the newly forming 1st Division. Private Cliett served in all the battles the 28th Infantry was involved in until he was killed in action on 20 July, 1918. He is memorialized on the Tablets to the Missing at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery at Belleau Wood. He was the first soldier from Grady County, Georgia killed in the war and his family received word on 2 August, 1918.  Nothing else is known about his case at this time.

Want to help shed some light on Private Cliett’s case? Consider making a donation to to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Commemorative Hat

Commemorative Ball Cap

Inspired by the iconic image of a U.S. Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA hat. The poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. The Navy hat with white Doughboy embroidery is a 100% cotton, structured with contrasting pancake visor, sweatband and taping, and pre-curved bill. The velcro closure features U.S. flag emblem. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. Order your Doughboy Commemorative hat here.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.  Proceeds from the Official WWI Centennial Merchandise help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.


John Green

For the next week, there will be a special ceremony held at the National WWI Museum and Memorial each night. The event will focus on honoring those who have served or currently serving, as well as those who gave their lives in the line of duty. It’s called “Taps at the Tower” and will happen at sunset each evening. One of the people playing Taps is John Green. He plays it the traditional way by playing the bugle. Click here to read more about Green’s bugling and the Taps in the Tower ceremony.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


you can help - shop using amazon smile


Poppy Seed Side Ad


Valor Medals Review logo small

Doughboy MIA



Pershing Sponsors

Pershing level sponsors post 11.18


email us


websitefacebooktwitter


Maurice Herbert Roberts

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Maurice Roberts

Submitted by: Thomas, “T.J.” Cullinane {Town Historian}

Maurice Herbert Roberts was born in 1900. Maurice Roberts served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Forgotten Sorrow, Forgotten Valor.

In gazing at the serene visage of Maurice Roberts, one gets the impression of a young man who has wisdom beyond his years. Just eighteen when he volunteered for the Army, Maurice had seen his mother Carrie pass away at age 39 after a long and painful fight with uterine cancer. As his unit was preparing for overseas movement at Camp Syracuse, New York, he would learn of the death of his nineteen year old sister Melissa from tuberculosis.

In spite of these tragedies, or perhaps because of them, Roberts would fight with reckless abandon on the Western Front. He would be cited twice for bravery by the French government, a very rare distinction for a lowly enlisted man, before being killed in action during the opening stages of the Meuse-Argonne Campaign.

Maurice Roberts was born in Derry, New Hampshire on May 2, 1900, to Albert B. “A.B.” Roberts, a shoemaker and town selectman and the former Carrie E. Nutter. The family made their home at No. 2 McGregor Street in Derry. In addition to Maurice and Melissa, A.B. and Carrie had two older children, Rena and Alvin. Alvin, who preferred to be called by his middle name Burton, also served in the war. He would see heavy fighting while assigned as an artilleryman with the 103rd Artillery Regiment, 26th “Yankee” Division. Burton survived the war, but would die three years before his fortieth birthday. Maurice, a student who probably never held a full time job, enlisted in the Army at age 18 and was given serial number 39184. His stateside training would eventually take him to Camp Syracuse, a mobilization camp located four miles outside the city. Here, he would be assigned to the 9th Infantry Regiment. The 9th Infantry was, and remains, a distinguished regular army unit. They are known as the “Manchus” a nickname they earned during the Boxer Rebellion in China where three of the their members had earned the Medal of Honor.

Read Maurice Herbert Roberts’ entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


NEW EPISODE: Stars And Stripes

An item from World War One Centennial Commission.


View as a webpage

WW1 Centennial News Logo

Stars And Stripes
WWI Last Issue

Episode #127

Stars & Stripes last WWI issue

On June 13, 1919 the last issue of the WWI Stars And Stripes is Published

Stars And Stripes Last WWI Issue

Host – Theo Mayer

  • Aftermath of WWI Perspective – Host | @ 02:25
  • Stars And Stripes Last WWI Issue – Host | @ 04:15
  • Insights into Stripes – Robert H. Rheid | @ 06:45
  • Preserving the Stripes’ Legacy – Laura Meyer & Sue Mayo | @ 10:05
  • Germany in Shock at Peace Treaty – Mike Shuster | @ 13:55
  • War Memoirs From WWI: “John Lucy” – Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 18:15
  • WWI Genealogy Research Guide Update – Host | @ 23:50
  • American POWs in WWI – Col Greg Eanes, (USAF ret.) | @ 25:30
  • Mobile WWI Museum Update – Keith Colley | @ 32:20
  • Dispatch Highlights – Host | @ 40:15

More….

Listen To The Podcast NOW

All about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


Join live recording

Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

New Twitter Handle for Podcast:

 @TheWW1Podcast

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


WW1CC logo 400 wide

Pershing level sponsors post 11.18

George Alfred Newburn: A soldier of the First World War

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Front Lines
George Alfred Newburn: A soldier of the First World War

George Alfred Newburn:
A soldier of the First World War

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

His name was George Alfred Newburn, a labourer from Victoria who was killed during the Battle of Hill 70 in France on Aug. 15, 1917. He was just 18 years old, although Newburn would have you believe he was 20.

For almost a century, Private Newburn was listed as missing in action. Then one day in July 2017, construction workers uncovered the skeletal remains of five soldiers near rue Léon Droux in the village of Vendin-le-Vieil.

In February, after extensive historical, genealogical, anthropological, archaeological and DNA analysis, the military’s Casualty Identification Review Board confirmed the identity of a single set of remains as those of Newburn.

READ MORE

50% OFF D-DAY SPECIAL ISSUES!
Military Milestones
Sister ships take part in evacuations

Sister ships take part in evacuations

Story by Sharon Adams

HMCS St. Laurent and HMCS Restigouche fired Canadian warships’ first shots of the Second World War on June 11, 1940, in the final echoes of the six-week Battle of France, during which more than half a million Allied troops and civilians were evacuated from ports in France, under great menace from the invading German army.

The biggest rescue happened May 26-June 4 at Dunkirk, France. British and French armies were trapped and surrounded during the German panzer drive to the English Channel. A Herculean effort by military and merchant ships, cargo boats and pleasure vessels managed to evacuate a third of a million troops.

But there were more troops, troops that had not yet been snared in the German net. On June 5, German attention turned to them.

READ MORE

This week in history
This week in history

June 13, 1916

Troops under command of Major-General Arthur Currie counterattack at Mount Sorrel in Belgium, restoring front lines at a cost of 8,000 Canadians killed, wounded or captured.

READ MORE

Hearing Life Canada
Legion Magazine

Next week! General Stanley McChrystal at your Club

An item from the Marine’s Memorial Association.


MMAFHeader1.png
FOLLOW US: Join Us on Facebook  follow us on instagram  Follow Us on Twitter  check out our youtube channgel
Don’t miss General Stanley McChrystal at the Marines’ Memorial on June 20th! 
M4 2015.jpg     Meet the Author with General Stanley McChrystal, USA (Ret): Leaders: Myth and Reality

Thursday, 20 June, 6:00pm
Marines’ Memorial Theatre – 609 Sutter Street San Francisco
This event is co-sponsored with the World Affairs Council

General Stanley McChrystal, USA (Ret) will speak on his latest book, Leaders: Myth and Reality, as well as his thirty-four years in the US Army, rising from a second lieutenant in the 82nd Airborne Division to a four-star general in command of all American and coalition forces in Afghanistan.

In his book, Leaders: Myth and Reality, General McChrystal profiles thirteen of history’s great leaders, including Walt Disney, Coco Chanel, and Robert E. Lee, to show that leadership is not what you think it is—and never was.

Following the event, General McChrystal will be available to sign books.  

Tickets are available through City Box Office.  When you get to the payment page, choose the member price of $30 per ticket or $55 with a copy of Leaders: Myth and Reality.  Reserve your tickets TODAY!   


And don’t miss these other great events! 
 
Ash Carter, Former U.S. Secretary of Defense – 15 July, 5pm
Commonwealth Club has offered member pricing for their event to Marines’ Memorial members! Click HERE for more information 
Indianapolis: The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-Year Fight to Exonerate an Innocent Man – 9 July, 6pm
Click HERE for more information
Meet the Author: Dale Brown – 10 August, 2pm
Click HERE for more information
Forward this email to a friend

609 Sutter St, San Francisco, CA 94102 | Tel: (415) 673-6672
Marine’s Memorial Association © 2019 All rights reserved.

NBA Finals Game 6 is here! RSVP for Raptors Viewing Party

Another item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


WATCH PARTY FOR GAME 6 TOMORROW!
Thursday, June 13
Doors Open 5:00 PM, Game Time 6:00PM
@ Table Top Tap House
Tim Hortons ® is pleased to invite you to celebrate and cheer on our Canadian team for Game 6 with half time remarks and raffle by the Consulate General of Canada in San Francisco.
Learn More & RSVP Here!
Copyright © 2019 C100 Association, All rights reserved.