WWI DISPATCH January 15, 2019

From the World War One Centennial Commission.


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January 15, 2019

January 1, 2019 Memorial Header

“We aligned our performance with the WWICC’s mission of remembrance and recognition of the war that changed the world.”

Brancy Classical Singer magazine

Vocalist John Brancy was featured this month in a new interview article in Classical Singer magazine. In the brilliant piece by interviewer Mary Claire Curran, Brancy opens up about his unique style, his remarkable commitment to World War I material, and his next efforts.  Click here to read the entire insightful and revealing article about the vocal half of the duo performing Silent Night: A Memorial in Song.


Color of Memory: Fabric Art in WWI exhibit coming to the World War I Museum in KC

Air Base fabric art 1917-1919

“Remember Me.” “Souvenir de France.” “Mother Dear.” “Merci!”These and countless other sentiments are expressed in the fabric art that came from World War I. Romantic and patriotic scenes were created on silk and cotton and wool felt. Many of the objects were made in direct response to those loved ones going to war from every country. Others were made for commercial purposes to serve the clamor for souvenirs. Click here to read more about the new exhibit that illustrates how fabric art became a colorful reminder of how deeply World War I affected those at home and away.


Names on a Wall: Documenting an Ohio county’s World War I Deaths in Service

Fayette County Ohio War Dead Memorial

Paul LaRue, a member of the Ohio WWI Centennial Committee, became curious about the sources available to locate or identify his community’s WWI deaths in service. Most Ohio counties honor their community’s World War I service members with a list of those who made the ultimate sacrifice. Paul’s county, Fayette, is no different. On the Fayette County Courthouse lawn is a monument with two plaques containing the names of Fayette County’s World War I dead (left). But the process of developing the list was more involved than just looking it up. Click here to read about the sources Paul used to develop a definitive database of Fayette County’s WWI deaths in service.


“There remains a lot to be seen on the American battlefields, if one knows where and how to look.”

Randy Gaulke

Randy Gaulke is a legendary battlefield tour guide, with particular expertise in World War I. He has been providing living history and tour services for several decades, to audiences here in the United States, and in Europe. He spent some time with us, to talk about his background, his efforts — and about how our followers can best work with professional battlefield tour guides, on their own trips to World War I sites.  Click here to read the entire interview, including Randy’s advice on planning a successful post-Centennial Commemoration tour of the American battlefields in France.


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Encore screenings of Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old” announced by Fathom Events for January 21

Back by popular demand! Fathom Events and Warner Bros. Pictures have partnered to bring Academy Award winner Peter Jackson’s poignant WWI documentary They Shall Not Grow Oldto cinemas for an encore presentation on January 21. Applying state-of-the-art restoration, colorization and 3D technologies to century-old footage—carefully chosen from hundreds of hours of original Great War film held in the archives of the Imperial War Museum (IWM)—Jackson has created an intensely gripping, immersive and authentic cinematic experience. The only narration comes from Great War veterans themselves, selected from over 600 hours of BBC and IWM archive interviews, resulting in a gripping account of “The War to End All Wars,” told by the soldiers who experienced it. The Fathom Events showings of They Shall Not Grow Old in December sold out quickly. Tickets for this encore January screening are available at FathomEvents.com and at participating theater box offices.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New – Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

American Indian Warriors - Pima tribe

Episode #105
Highlights: Looking Ahead at 1919!

Host: Theo Mayer

1919 Overview Roundtable – Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Host | @02:00

Wilson’s Great Challenge – Mike Shuster | @17:40

First into Germany: SGT Roy Holtz – And he did it on a Harley – Host | @22:00(Courtesy of author Robert Laplander)

A Century in the Making: The Winning Team – Joe Weishaar & Sabin Howard | @29:00

“American Indians in WWI”: New Website – Erin Fehr | @39:30

New showings of Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old” – Host | @46:40

WWI in education: Memorializing The Fallen – Host | @49:00


Literature in WWI This Week

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Not One, But Two Years of WWrite in Review!
Part 3: WWrite Goes to Yale for Armistice Day.

After almost two years of WWrite’s life, the blog had the opportunity to go from writing on the screen to live discussion at Yale University. Why Yale? Nearly 10,000 Yale students served and the campus served as a militarized facility with an officers training camp and artillery training courses. It would have been hard for any Yale student to ignore WWI. For November 2018, The Yale Veterans Association organized a panel “The Literary Legacy of World War I: Screening of Paths of Glory” with featured WWrite contributors Adrian Bonenberger, Peter Molin, Benjamin Busch, Jennifer Orth-Veillon, and Yale Dean, Brianne Bilsky. Read the panel proceedings at WWrite this week, which include analyses of Stanley Kubrick’s legendary Paths of Glory pivotal WWI literary works by Siegfried Sassoon, Ernest Hemingway, and Aline Kilmer.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Honoring the Doughboys: Following My Grandfather's World War I Diary 300

Honoring the Doughboys Book

Honoring the Doughboys: Following My Grandfather’s World War I Diary is a stunning presentation of contemporary photographs taken by the author that are paired with diary entries written by his grandfather, George A. Carlson, who was a soldier in the U.S. Army during World War I. A segment of the book was recently featured in the December 25 edition of DISPATCH. Lowdermilk followed his grandfather’s path through France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany and returned with these meticulously crafted photographs and his own engaging stories that bring the diary to life for contemporary readers. Lowdermilk’s passion for World War I and military history began as a young boy when he listened to his grandfather tell his stories about serving as an infantryman– a “doughboy”–in Europe during the Great War.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Coin Display

The US Mint stopped selling the World War I Commemorative Coin on December 27, but you can still purchase the limited edition silver dollar in combination with our specially-designed display stand, personalized with information about your WWI ancestor, from the Centennial Official Merchandise store. This package makes a great collectible gift for family members and descendants of those who served in World War I. Personalization can include: rank, full name, enlisted date, deceased date, unit/decorations, battles, cemetery, etc. If you already purchased the Commemorative Coin from the US Mint, you can order just the personalized display. Both the combo set and display alone are available hereSupplies are limited.  And remember: proceeds from the sale of this item go towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC.


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William B. Wilson

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

William B. Wilson

Submitted by: Harold G. Delamater {Commander VFW Post 666}

William B. Wilson was born around 1893. William Wilson served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1916 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Beacon’s Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 666 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the death of the solider who is the eponym of that organization — Private William B. Wilson. He was killed in action in Belgium on August 19, 1918, the first soldier from Beacon to die in World War I.

Today, a century after his death on the battlefield, few know of him or the reason why the Wilson Post was so named. History can be fickle and easily forgotten after a generation or two, but Private Wilson’s story of sacrifice needs to be retold and remembered.

Wilson went off to war with two of his best friends, George Van Pelt of Beacon and Herbert Miller of Newburgh. The three, with about 50 other Beacon boys, joined up in Newburgh’s “Company L” of the 107 Infantry Regiment. By late April of 1918, the regiment had landed in France.

Read William B. Wilson’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Looking ahead at 1919!

From the World War One Centennial Commission.


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Looking ahead
at 1919!

Episode #105

American Indian Warriors - Pima tribe

American Indian Warriors – Pvt. Peter Moore & Pvt. James Morrison both Pima Indians, flanking 1st Lt. Wayne Flowree all of the 2nd Division.

Looking Ahead at 1919!

Host: Theo Mayer

  • 1919 Overview Roundtable – Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Host | @02:00
  • Wilson’s Great Challenge – Mike Shuster | @17:40
  • First into Germany: SGT Roy Holtz – And He Did it on a Harley – Host | @22:00 (Courtesy of author Robert Laplander)
  • A Century in the Making: The Winning Team – Joe Weishaar & Sabin Howard | @29:00
  • “American Indians in WWI”: New Website – Erin Fehr | @39:30
  • New showings of Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old” – Host | @46:40
  • WWI in Education: Memorializing The Fallen – Host | @49:00

Listen To The Podcast NOW

Learn all about WW1 THEN and NOW while you drive, work or play.


Coming up next week:

Part 2 of “First Into Germany: Sgt Roy Holtz”
Part 2 of “A Century in the Making”
and much more…

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


Join live recording

Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

New Twitter Handle for Podcast:

 @TheWW1Podcast

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


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New Year, New C100 Events – Join Us!

From one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay area.


Upcoming C100 Events
Wednesday, January 16th
San Francisco, CA

5:30 PM – 7:30 PM
CiT is an evening event hosted every month to celebrate all things Canadian and all things tech. Whether you live in the Bay Area or you’re just visiting, we welcome you to join us January 16th, for some drinks and good conversation—you’ll be in good company! This is a ticketed event, so please RSVP below if you wish to attend.Location will be announced 48 hours before the event.
RSVP Now
Tuesday, February 12th
San Francisco, CA

6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Are you a current Canadian intern or co-op student in the Bay Area working in tech? Want to connect with fellow Canadian interns and make the most of your time here? Join us on February 12th for an event C100 is hosting just for you to meet each other and get involved while your here on your internship and beyond.

We’ll provide food, drinks and community. Join us and get plugged in!

RSVP Now
Interested in exploring career opportunities in Canada? C100 is hosting our annual Growth Summit in February and if you’re looking to learn more about the Canadian tech scene, our opening reception on February 5th featuring some of the 25 fastest growing companies in Canada is for you! Send us an email at connect@thec100.org to learn more.
This coming May, C100 will bring 30 early stage companies to the SF Bay Area for our signature event 48Hrs in the Valley. This one-of-a-kind program includes mentorship, thought partnership, and venture guidance from experts and peers. C100 has hosted over 250 companies at 48Hrs since the program’s inception in 2010.

48Hrs applications are by nomination. You may be nominated by a C100 Partner, Charter Member, or 48Hrs Alum in your network.

The final deadline for companies to submit applications is February 15, 2019. So be sure to send along your nominations ASAP.

Thank You to Our Partners
FOUNDATIONAL PARTNERS
CORPORATE MEMBERS
With special thanks to:
Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.
Copyright © 2019 C100 Association, All rights reserved.

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Douglas Gordon (Part 2): The troubles with Typhoons

From the Legion Magazine.


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Douglas Gordon (Part 2): The troubles with Typhoons

Douglas Gordon (Part 2):
The troubles with Typhoons

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

If the Germans didn’t get you, the Typhoon just might.

Flying Officer Douglas Gordon knew it only too well. Between June and August 1944, 19 Allied squadrons—his own among them—lost hundreds of the hulking aircraft and 150 pilots, many of them due to engine or structural failure.

“She was a monster; she was just a real miserable aircraft,” said Gordon, a 95-year-old native of Lachute, Que., who survived 99 combat missions at the stick of the Hawker-built plane. He flew multiple sorties on D-Day and into the Falaise Gap with 440 (City of Ottawa) Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force.

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Military Milestones
Maggie delivers peacekeepers to the Suez Canal

Maggie delivers peacekeepers to the Suez Canal

On Jan. 12, 1957, HMCS Magnificent arrived at Port Said, Egypt, delivering Canadian peacekeepers for the UN Emergency Force policing the Suez Crisis.

Light aircraft carriers built in Britain during the Second World War, Magnificent and HMCS Warrior were earmarked for Canada, in anticipation of an expanded role in the Pacific. Only one carrier was required after the war ended and Warrior was transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy in 1946.

After the war, Canada signed the NATO agreement, pledged to an anti-submarine role. An aircraft carrier also increased the navy’s capability in the air defence of North America, including the Arctic, at the beginning of the Cold War. But Warrior, a Colossus-class vessel, was not designed for cold climate operations and was exchanged for the Majestic-class Magnificent in 1948.

READ MORE

This week in history
On this date: January 2019

January 9, 1990

Space Shuttle Columbia mission STS-32 launches to retrieve material left in orbit for six years, including space durability experiments for the University of Toronto’s Institute for Aerospace Studies.

READ MORE

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Legion Magazine

WWI DISPATCH January 8, 2019

From the World War One Centennial Commission.


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January 8, 2019

January 1, 2019 Memorial Header

“Connecting Vets” radio network features new National World War I Memorial in DC

Entercom Connecting Veterans logo

The Entercom “Connecting Vets.com” radio platform web site put the spotlight on the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. with an episode that featured the fly-thru video of the memorial design. Click here to view the new Connecting Vets.com page with links to the fly-thru video, and previous coverage of the Memorial as well. Connecting Vets.com has also provided other recent coverage of important United States World War I Centennial Commission projects, with both the Hello Girls Gold Medal initiative, and the Valor Medals Task Force being featured in separate programs.


“American Indians in WWI” site now live

SNRC Shield

A century ago, American Indians went to war for the United States, almost all as volunteers, despite the fact that most were not citizens. To honor and remember their service, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock’s Sequoyah National Research Center (SNRC) has developed the new “American Indians in World War I” section of the United States World War I Centennial Commission web site, which is now live. The section (ww1cc.org/americanindian) commemorates the service of 12,000 American Indians and Alaska Natives who served in the war, both in and out of uniform. The site features articles on all aspects of a soldier’s service and includes a timeline of American Indian history, and a new database of those who served. American Indian women who served as nurses are highlighted in a separate section that includes biographies of each woman. A map of Native American war memorials is also included. Click here to read more about this outstanding new addition to the World War I Centennial Commission web site.


National History Day Selects Eighteen Teachers to Study World War I in Europe

NHD_USWW1CC_Pritzker logos

Eighteen educators from across America have been selected to participate in Memorializing the Fallen — a teacher professional development program from National History Day®. Sponsored by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission and the Pritzker Military Museum and Library, the program takes educators on the journey of a lifetime to rediscover the history of World War I and invigorate its teaching in America’s classrooms. Throughout the program, teachers attend virtual lectures, participate in discussions, and research a service member who never returned home. In June 2019, the educators will venture to Europe where they will walk in the footsteps of history. Click here to read more about this outstanding, innovative World War I education program.


Collaborative project brings forgotten WWI-era stories to a worldwide audience through Virtual Reality technology

Beeson screen shot

Forgotten stories of World War I are being made available to students nationwide through immersive storytelling technology thanks to a collaborative partnership with Google Expeditions, the Friends of the Victory Memorial, and the West Virginia University Reed College of Media Innovation Center. This project, “WWI Through the Eyes of the Chicago Defender,” brings history to life through virtual reality. The VR project takes viewers on a tour of WWI-era United States as seen through the eyes of the nation’s most influential black weekly newspaper at that time. The project has been commissioned for Google Expeditions, a product that allows teachers to take their classes on virtual field trips, immersing students in experiences that bring abstract concepts to life, brings virtual objects into the classroom, and gives students a deeper understanding of the world beyond the classroom. Click here to read more about this incredible new World War I educational project utilizing 21st Century technology to tell 100 year-old stories.


Connecticut seeks students to help in restoration of World War I American trenches in Seicheprey, France

Christine Pittsley

The Connecticut Heritage Foundation, on behalf of the Connecticut State Library, is hosting an incredible high school education opportunity, “Digging Into History: Trench Restoration In Seicheprey France”. The project is in cooperation with the Communaute de Communes Mad et Moselle, and aims to restore a section of World War I trenches in Seicheprey, France. Student applications are due by January 20, 2019. Project Director Christine Pittsley (left), member of the Connecticut WWI Centennial Committee, and a noted historian and educator, took some time to tell us about her vision for this remarkable hands-on education project. Click here to get all the details about this hands-on history opportunity for students now.


200 Bells: Amazing Armistice Centennial Event hosted by the John J. Morris American Legion Post 62 of Peoria, AZ

Post 62 Bells of Peace

Although the World War I Armistice Centennial took place a few weeks ago, we continue to be amazed by stories that are coming to us from around the country, on local commemorative events that took place to honor our World War I veterans. One such story came to us from our friends at the John J. Morris American Legion Post 62 of Peoria, Arizona, where the Post 62 Auxiliary decided to do something special as part of the World War I Centennial Commission’s “Bells of Peace” program. Click here to read what the Post’s Public Affairs volunteer Marge Christianson told us about their Bells of Peace event in Arizona.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Dr. Frederick Dickinson on Japan in the Great War

Dickinson

On the World War I Centennial News Podcast, we’re taking a look back at some of our favorite segments from 2018. In Episode 84, which aired on August 10th, Professor of Japanese History at the University of Pennsylvania and noted Japan expert Dr. Frederick Dickinson joined the show to elucidate Japan’s important but oft-neglected role in the war. Did you know that the Japanese Navy fought U-boats in the Caribbean Sea in WWI? Click here to get more astonishing information in this transcript of the interview.

Kenneth Davis on the Spanish Flu

Davis

On the World War I Centennial News Podcast, we’re taking a look back at some of our favorite segments from 2018. On Episode 70, which aired on May 4th, author Kenneth Davis joined the show to discuss the deadly pandemic that swept the world in 1918. Click here to learn more about the phenomena that took more lives than the bullets and shells in World War I, in the complete transcript of this interview.

War in the Sky: PTSD Among the Pilots in World War I with Mark Wilkins

Manfred von Richthofen

On the World War I Centennial News Podcast, we’re taking a look back at some of our favorite segments from 2018. On Episode 66, which aired on April 4th, historian and aeronautical expert Mark Wilkins joined the show to discuss the prevalence of PTSD in the ranks of WWI pilots and his recent work on the subject of WWI aviation. Did you know that even the most famous World War I pilot, Germany’s Manfred von Richthofen (left) — better known as the Red Baron — suffered PTSD? Click here to read the entire transcript of the interview, and learn more about how what we think of as a modern scourge of people in combat was first identified in WWI.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it’s about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New – Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Toasting in the new year with some french bubbly

Episode 104
Highlights: Favorite Segments of 2018 – Part 2:

Host: Theo Mayer

Part 1 came out last week – the last week of 2018, and here is Part 2 published the first week of 2019.


This episode includes:

  • June 29, Episode #78How WWI Shaped the 20th Century with Dr. Jay Winter |@ 01:10
  • July 20, Episode #81
    A two for One combo…. with WWI War Tech and Speaking WWI both about photography! |@ 07:45
  • August 10, Episode #84
    Japan in WWI with Dr. Frederick Dickinson |@ 13:50
  • In the same episode #84
    The 28th Division: Pennsylvania National Guard doughboys fight from Dr. Edward Lengel |@ 21:35
  • October 5, Episode #92
    The Lost Battalion – with Rob Laplander |@ 27:35
  • November 2, Episode #94
    Maneuverings: Both military and diplomatic with Mike Shuster |@ 34:20
  • November 11, Episode #98
    From World War I Armistice Centennial Day Sacred Service – an excerpt: The Last One Down: Henry Gunther, Written by Matthew Naylor Underscored with The Unanswered Question by Aaron Copeland performed by World War I Centennial Orchestra and read by Dr. Libby O’Connell |@ 38:05
  • December 14th, Episode #101
    Three Key impacts of WWI with historian, Sir Hew Strachan |@ 42:35

Literature in WWI

Wwrite Blog Logo

Two Years of WWrite in Review! January 2017 – January 2019.

Part 2: African Americans in WWI

Over the month of January, to prepare for the remaining months of the blog, WWrite is publishing a series that will document and synthesize the 100+ blog contributions from January 2017 to January 2019.

This week – Tremendous contributions from African Americans helped win WWI.

Unfortunately, their efforts went unrecognized for almost a century as most of the country refused to acknowledge their service. It is estimated that almost 40,000 African American veterans were denied medals of honor during the war.

The centennial has provided the opportunity to unearth these lost voices, but we still have a long way to go. Read this second installment of the series that only scratches the surface of the rich African American WWI experience.


Fathom encore Jan 21

Encore screenings of Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old” announced by Fathom Events for January 21

Back by popular demand! Fathom Events and Warner Bros. Pictures have partnered to bring Academy Award winner Peter Jackson’s poignant WWI documentary They Shall Not Grow Oldto cinemas for an encore presentation on January 21. Applying state-of-the-art restoration, colorization and 3D technologies to century-old footage—carefully chosen from hundreds of hours of original Great War film held in the archives of the Imperial War Museum (IWM)—Jackson has created an intensely gripping, immersive and authentic cinematic experience. The only narration comes from Great War veterans themselves, selected from over 600 hours of BBC and IWM archive interviews, resulting in a gripping account of “The War to End All Wars,” told by the soldiers who experienced it. The Fathom Events showings of They Shall Not Grow Old in December sold out quickly. Tickets for this encore January screening will be available soon at FathomEvents.com and participating theater box offices.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Coin Display

Mint Commemorative Coin Display

The US Mint stopped selling the World War I Commemorative Coin on December 27, but you can still purchase the limited edition silver dollar in combination with our specially-designed display stand, personalized with information about your WWI ancestor, from the Centennial Official Merchandise store. This package makes a great collectible gift for family members and descendants of those who served in World War I. Personalization can include: rank, full name, enlisted date, deceased date, unit/decorations, battles, cemetery, etc. If you already purchased the Commemorative Coin from the US Mint, you can order just the personalized display. Both the combo set and display alone are available at hereSupplies are limited.  And remember: proceeds from the sale of this item go towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Archie Henry Thomas

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Archie Henry Thomas

Submitted by: Gregory Neifeld {Great-Grandson}

Archie Henry Thomas born around 1885. Archie Thomas served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1909 and the service was completed in 1925.

Story of Service

Between April and September 1916, Archie was stationed on the Mexican border in California with the Oregon Third Infantry Regiment, Company I during the Mexican Border War. His regiment was activated into federal service after Pancho Villa’s raid in Columbus, New Mexico.

While on the border, Archie was promoted to Corporal in July 1916 and he was promoted to Sergeant before his return to Oregon in September.

This was an era in which the U.S.-Mexico border was perceived as a potential location for a German-funded invasion by Mexico. Border service went into effect when this threat was exposed by the British interception of the Zimmerman Telegram. This message discussed Germany’s alliance proposal for Mexico if the U.S. entered the European war against Germany.

The onset of American involvement in World War I prompted all National Guard regiments to reactivate under federal service. This activation included the Oregon Third Infantry Regiment in March 1917. In July 1917, the unit was mustered at Camp Withycombe, Oregon and transferred to Camp Greene, North Carolina for training.

Read Archie Henry Thomas’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Some Favorite Segments of 2018 – Part 2

From the World War One Centennial Commission.


View as a webpage

WW1 Centennial News Logo

Some Favorites
of 2018 – Part 2:

Episode #104

Toasting in the new year with some french bubbly

Toasting in the new year with some french bubbly

Favorite Segments of 2018 – Part 2

Host: Theo Mayer

Last week and this week, we have a two-episode special. We have pulled together some of our favorite stories and segments from 2018!

They are presented in chronological order. Part 1 came out last week – the last week of 2018, and here is Part 2 published the first week of 2019.


This episode includes:

  • June 29, Episode #78
    How WWI Shaped the 20th Century with Dr. Jay Winter |@ 01:10
  • July 20, Episode #81
    A Two-for-One Combo…. with WWI War Tech and Speaking WWI both about photography! |@ 07:45
  • August 10, Episode #84
    Japan in WWI with Dr. Frederick Dickinson |@ 13:50
  • In the same episode #84,
    The 28th Division: Pennsylvania National Guard doughboys fight from Dr. Edward Lengel |@ 21:35
  • October 5, Episode #92
    The Lost Battalion – with Rob Laplander |@ 27:35
  • November 2, Episode #94
    Maneuverings: Both Military and Diplomatic with Mike Shuster |@ 34:20
  • November 11, Episode #98
    From the World War I Armistice Centennial Day Sacred Service – an excerpt:
    “The Last One Down: Henry Gunther”, written by Matthew Naylor, underscored with “The Unanswered Question” by Aaron Copeland performed by the World War I Centennial Orchestra and read by Dr. Libby O’Connell |@ 38:05
  • December 14th, Episode #101
    Three Key impacts of WWI with historian, Sir Hew Strachan |@ 42:35

Listen To The Podcast NOW

Learn all about WW1 and the centennial while you drive, work or play.


Coming up next week:

2019 Preview Roundtable and much more…

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on iTunes and listen anytime on your mobile device.
Also available on Google Play  Podbean TuneIn Stitcher Radio On Demand , Spotify and now you can listen on Youtube
For smart speakers say: “play W W One Centennial News Podcast”


Join live recording

Register to join us as we record and produce the show. Ask questions of the guests. Let us know what you think. Get the link list right during the show. Most Wednesdays at Noon, Eastern.

New Twitter Handle for Podcast:

 @TheWW1Podcast

Use our research and publish the stories. Join our live recording sessions and get ALL THE LINKS TO STORY SOURCES before we publish the podcast.


WW1CC logo 400 wide

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