Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach – From the Department of National Defence et al

An item from our colleagues at the RCAF Association.



Dear Dr. Friend,

The Minister of National Defence, the Honourable Anita Anand, the Chief of the Defence Staff, General Wayne Eyre, and the Deputy Minister, Jody Thomas, issued the following statement: Statement from the Minister of National Defence, the Chief of the Defence Staff, and the Deputy Minister of National Defence – Canada.ca

Sincerely,

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Team
Veterans Affairs Canada
vac.engagement.acc@veterans.gc.ca

 

Chers intervenants,

La ministre de la Défense nationale, l’honorable Anita Anand, le Chef d’état‑major de la Défense, le général Wayne Eyre, et la sous‑ministre, Jody Thomas, ont fait la déclaration suivante : Déclaration de la ministre de la Défense nationale, du Chef d’état‑major de la Défense et de la sous-ministre de la Défense nationale  – Canada.ca

Cordialement,

L’équipe de Mobilisation et sensibilisation des intervenants
Anciens Combattants Canada
vac.engagement.acc@veterans.gc.ca

This e-mail was sent from Royal Canadian Air Force Association (rcaf_list@airforce.ca)

Royal Canadian Air Force Association,405-222 Somerset St. West Ottawa ON K2P 2G3 CANADA, Phone Number:(613) 232-4281, Fax Number: (613) 232-2156, Email Address: director@airforce.ca, Website : http://rcafassociation.ca

Grad research showcase; Happy Hanukkah; Why Canadian unis are attracting more students

A newsletter from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Upcoming event: Hildebrand Graduate Research Showcase
  • Happy Hanukkah from Canadian Studies!
  • In the News: More UK students choosing Canadian universities
  • External events:
  • “Canadian Brass: Making Spirits Bright for 50 Years and Counting”
UPCOMING EVENT
Hildebrand Graduate Research Showcase
December 7 | 12:30 pm | Online | RSVP here
Learn about the research Canadian Studies funds through our Edward Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowships, as recipients present short overviews of their projects. Participating scholars are below; RSVP to canada@berkeley.edu.
Caylee Hong, Ph.D. can., Anthropology
“Orphaned Wells: The Impact of Corporate Bankruptcy on Energy Infrastructures and Municipal Futures”
Mass bankruptcies of energy companies have “orphaned” thousands of oil and gas wells across Canada and the United States in recent years. Without solvent owners to plug and decommission them, such wells pose serious environmental, financial, and health and safety concerns, especially in urban areas. Caylee examines the ways that cities and their residents grapple with these oil and gas wells in their midst. In this talk, Caylee will draw upon her comparative research from several diverse urban environments in British Columbia, Alberta, and California.
Sophie Major, Ph.D. can., Energy & Resources Group
“Engaging with Indigenous Political Thought From British Columbia”
Sophie’s research examines the marginalization of Indigenous people and Indigenous knowledge in political theory discourses and asks if and how political theorists ought to engage with Indigenous political thought. Incorporating original ethnographic work with First Nations peoples in British Columbia, Canada, Sophie’s dissertation introduces a number of case studies, illustrating the strengths of an ethnographic, historicist, genealogical, and interpretive approach to the study of Indigenous political theory.
Happy Hanukkah from Canadian Studies!
Sunday marked the beginning of Hanukkah, the Jewish “festival of lights”. The eight-day-long celebration commemorates the recapture of Jerusalem by Maccabee rebels fighting against the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BCE. Families celebrate by lighting one candle on a nine-branched candelabrum called a menorah every day of the celebration; they also exchange gifts, eat symbolic oil-fried foods, and play traditional games with a top called a dreidel.
Surprisingly, the popularity of Hanukkah among contemporary Jews is largely an American phenomenon. Originally a minor religious holiday, it gained increased prominence over the 20th century as an alternative to Christmas during the North American “holiday season” between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. With the world’s first- and fourth-largest Jewish populations residing in the US and Canada, many municipalities now erect large menorahs alongside their official Christmas trees. (Charlottetown, P.E.I. celebrated its first-ever official menorah lighting yesterday.)
From all of us at Canadian Studies, chag Hanukkah sameach!
Image: Hanukkah vector created by Freepik on www.freepik.com.
IN THE NEWS
Canadian Universities Attract Growing Numbers of Top UK Students
Great Britain is well-known as the home of some of the world’s greatest universities. However, a growing number of Brits are looking across the Atlantic for their education. The CBC reports that in 2019, the number of British international students at Canadian universities jumped 10%.
While the total population remains modest at around 2,500, government officials say the increase represents a much-desired breakthrough. Top-tier British schools such as Oxford and Cambridge have long been top choices for Canadian students, but until recently very little attention was paid the other direction. Canadian diplomats in London welcome the trend, which they say “evens out” a formerly unidirectional exchange of knowledge and increases the country’s international profile.
So, what’s behind this change in perception? Education specialists say that students are discovering Canadian universities offer several advantages. First, several of Canada’s universities are now considered globally competitive (with University of Toronto ranked #16 globally by US News). Many Canadian universities often offer more educational flexibility than those in Britain, allowing for greater creativity in combining courses and developing custom degree programs. And while US universities retain a global advantage, students are attracted by the significantly lower cost of education in Canada, where even top schools can cost up to 50% less than mid-level US competitors.
Image: McGill University’s Arts Building. Paul Lowry, Wikimedia Commons.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Canadian Brass: Making Spirits Bright for 50 Years and Counting
December 11 | 8 pm | Zellerbach Hall | Buy tickets
For half a century, the lighthearted but seriously virtuosic Canadian Brass has been luring listeners of all ages to the rich, exciting, exuberant sound of brass music. The Grammy-winning quintet, with more than 100 recordings to its name, has charmed audiences from Moscow and Beijing to Boston and Tokyo, playing a dizzying range of repertoire including music of the Baroque, Dixieland, Broadway, and John Philip Sousa.
This very special holiday program features originals like “Bach’s Bells”; favorite songs such as “White Christmas,” “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” and “Christmas Time Is Here”; and familiar classical, choral, and popular music arranged to make brass instruments sing.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Webinar: Alistair Edgar on Peace-Building in Afghanistan

These webinars, which are offered in partnership with Dominion Command, may be of interest to some members.


“Give War a Chance: Are Peace-Building and Stabilization a Bust after Afghanistan?”
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Alistair Edgar

Give War a Chance: Are Peace-Building and Stabilization a Bust after Afghanistan?

December 1st, 7:30 PM ET

The webinar is FREE on Zoom.

Registration is required, but you do not need a Zoom account to watch.

Register HERE

Even before the Taliban’s rapid return to power in Afghanistan, most western governments—including Canada—appeared to have abandoned their willingness to engage in peacekeeping, peace-building and/or ‘stabilization’ interventions that involved placing western ‘boots on the ground’ in support of populations who were facing large scale threats of violence. This presentation will consider why that dis-engagement has taken place, and what it means for Canada and especially the Canadian Forces.
UPCOMING WEBINARS

12 January | Speaker Series
John Boyko
“Canada and the Vietnam War”
Click HERE to Register

16 February | Speaker Series
Maya Goldenberg
“Vaccine Hesitancy: Public Trust, Expertise and the War on Science”
Click HERE to Register

Presented by:
Click here to listen to the latest episode of On War & SocietyOh What A Visual War with Beatriz Pichel.

On War & Society features authors discussing their research, the challenges associated with doing history, and life ‘behind the book.’

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Our mailing address is:
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Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada

Successfully commemorating the Tomb’s Centennial at ANC

A item from another veterans organization based in the Bay Area.


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Dear Michael,

Thank all of you for being part of this unique event.  Arlington National Cemetery selected The Memorial Day Flowers Foundation and the Foundation for the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to distribute flowers to visitors for placement at the Tomb.

MDFF prepared a large floral arrangement for the Chief of the Crow Nation to inaugurate the commemoration.

On the 9th and 10th of November over 20,000 people queued quietly and patiently for the honor to lay a flower at the Tomb.  Some were soldiers, many retired military.  There were priests and there were nuns.  Entire families, some even with newborns, stood in line, amazed at how many people shared their passion for honoring those who served.

Over 70,000 complimentary flowers were made available to cemetery visitors.  For the first time since the Tomb’s inauguration in 1921, visitors were allowed to walk on the plaza to place their flower tribute.  Volunteers handed flowers to visitors as they approached, many of whom shared intimate stories highlighting why they would place a flower and salute the Tomb.

Bouquets were also made available for visitors for them to take home or place at headstones throughout the cemetery.  Other volunteers worked tirelessly placing flowers at nearby sections, actively looking for the 5,000+ markers of unknown soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.

All this took three months in preparation with providers, sponsors, volunteers, and supporters, as well as making sure that the ANC administration was familiar with our plans and execution.

The Foundation’s work is mostly logistics, ensuring that the flowers arrive at the right place at the right time. It truly is an honor to work with the incredible group of core volunteers who come back time and again, making the flowers look as beautiful as possible and get them into the hand of cemetery visitors.

An especially heartfelt thanks to our corporate sponsors Peraton, TD Bank, and Truist, for funding this event, as well as bringing their associates to hand out flowers and respectfully engage with the visitors.  These three companies are continuous platinum sponsors for the Memorial Day events at Arlington National Cemetery and other national cemeteries.

A Special Thanks

Flowers and logistics are provided by the following sponsors.

Partner


Platinum Sponsor


Gold Sponsors


Silver Sponsors

A Special Note:
It was a pleasure working side-by-side with the enthusiastic volunteers and members of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Foundation.
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#mdff #wesupport #wehonor #wethank

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