Tag Archives: Canada’s History

Asian-Canadian History: Not Just Immigrants

Members should note the item below on “Witness to War… And Peace” that may be of particular interest in this edition of Canada’s History magazine.


Plus: Being Kaur | New Museum opens…
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Canada's History
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Not Just Immigrants

South Asian Canadian Legacy Project aims at preserving the community’s heritage through historic site tours, a travelling museum, educational resources and more. Read more

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Home Made Visible

In preserving and contextualizing old home movie footage from Indigenous and visible minority Canadians and restoring these histories for families and communities, this project explores how archives have the power to shape who we become and how we relate to one another. Listen now

Chinese Students Challenge Segregation

The history of school segregation is seldom remembered in Victoria, British Columbia but two buildings in the heart of today’s Chinatown played a central role in the Chinese community’s response to it. Read more

Witness to War… and Peace

New museum will explore the Asian experience during the Second World War. Read more

Flying and Spying

Chinese-Canadian Kam Len “Doug” Sam served in the air force in the Second World War. Shot down in France, he gathered critical information as a spy for the Allies. Watch now

Being Kaur

Kaur Collective builds community for Sikh women through prayers. Read more

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Canada’s History Archive featuring The Beaver

Please note: Some items featured in our newsletters and social media will include links to the Canada’s History Archive. The Beaver magazine was founded, and for decades was published, during eras shaped by colonialism. Concepts such as racial, cultural, or gender equality were rarely, if ever, considered by the magazine or its contributors. In earlier issues, readers will find comments and terms now considered derogatory. Canada’s History Society cautions readers to explore the archive using historical thinking concepts — not only analyzing the content but asking questions of who shaped the content and why.
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You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.
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Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada

Latest Video: Wildfire | Summer Reading Guide

Note the “Behind the Lines” article below that may be of interest to members.


Plus: Honouring Canada’s History Champions
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Canada's History

Honouring Canada’s History Champions

Governor General’s History Awards recipients recognized for fostering a greater understanding of Canadian history. Read more

2022 Recipient of the Governor General’s History Award for Scholarly Research

Drawing on a wide range of written and oral archives, this year’s recipient examined the physical, political, and cultural making of the Canada-US border from the 1770s to the early twentieth century in beautiful and compelling prose. Read more

2022 Summer Reading Guide

Our special advertising section includes the latest history titles along with other new and recent books from Canadian publishers. Read more

A Hair-raising Tale

The Spring 1972 issue of The Beaver explored the hectic habits of Arctic ground squirrels. Read more

Behind the lines

Canadian teenager pays tribute to family flying ace in a new graphic novel set during the Second World War. Read more

History Bits: Wildfire

Meet Tom Longboat, an Onondaga long-distance runner who becomes a world-class athlete. Watch now

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Canada’s History Archive featuring The Beaver

Please note: Some items featured in our newsletters and social media will include links to the Canada’s History Archive. The Beaver magazine was founded, and for decades was published, during eras shaped by colonialism. Concepts such as racial, cultural, or gender equality were rarely, if ever, considered by the magazine or its contributors. In earlier issues, readers will find comments and terms now considered derogatory. Canada’s History Society cautions readers to explore the archive using historical thinking concepts — not only analyzing the content but asking questions of who shaped the content and why.
Did you get this newsletter from a friend? Sign up for your own and you’ll be eligible to win a FREE book!
We have five uniquely curated newsletters, including ones for teachers and in French. Sign Up Now
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© 2022 Canada’s History, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.
Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada

Celebrating Tom Longboat Day

This is a piece that members might find interesting concerning a Canadian World War I hero.


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Canada's History

Wildfire

Tom Longboat was the greatest long-distance runner in the world in the years before the First World War. He died in 1949 back home on the Six Nations Reserve where he was born. He was inducted to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame in 1955. In 2008, Ontario declared that from then on, June 4 would be known as Tom Longboat Day.

In honour of Tom Longboat Day, the first season of History Bits finishes strong with “Wildfire.” Watch the episode now and don’t forget to explore our collection of other resources for Indigenous History Month.

Cree Code Talkers

Inspired by “Wildfire”In this lesson inspired by the History Bits episode “Wildfire,” students will expand their knowledge and dive deeper into lesser-known Indigenous histories in Canada, particularly those of Second World War Cree Code Talkers. Learn more

Who Do You Think I Am? A Story of Tom Longboat

Over the years, the legend of Tom Longboat has been revised from a mockery to an homage. Today he is presented as a superb athlete, an Onondagan who strode across the earth faster, further, and more gloriously than any man alive. Learn more

Truth and Reconciliation Week 2021

Produced in collaboration with the National Centre for Truth and ReconciliationThrough an allegorical graphic novel-style comic, written by Ry Moran, and illustrated by Swampy Cree artist Nickia McIvor, Truth and Reconciliation Week 2021 explores what it means to have guests arrive at your doorstep, and your home taken away, and how we can still find ways to live well together. Explore publication and educator’s guide

Every Child Matters

Produced in collaboration with the National Centre for Truth and ReconciliationWritten by award-winning Indigenous author Monique Gray Smith, Every Child Matters: Reconciliation Through Education is based on the Seven Sacred Teachings and teaches children about residential schools, Treaties, and the historic and current relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. Explore publication and educator’s guide

Treaties Publications

Introduce your students to different aspects of Treaty history with these special publications. Treaties and the Treaty Relationship is perfect for high school students, while We Are All Treaty People is geared towards younger learners. Learn more

14th Canada’s History Forum
Called to Act: Truth, Reconciliation, and Collaboration

with special guest The Honourable Murray Sinclair

Saturday, June 4, 2022 from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. CT
Join fellow teachers, historians, researchers, and community members for a conversation about truth and reconciliation.


The Canada’s History Forum is open to the public and free to attend.
Please register to attend in-person or via livestream:
CanadasHistory.ca/HistoryForum

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© 2022 Canada’s History, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada

Kayak explores symbols in Canada!

Note this item from Canada’s History magazine.  The item on “The First World War in Symbols” may be of particular interest to members, as well as the World War I connection to the national anthem in the article entitled “We Stand on Guard.”


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Canada's History

Symbols in Canada

Some of our national symbols are almost as well-known as our maple-leaf flag — things like the Parliament buildings in Ottawa or our anthem, “O Canada.” But we also have a national animal, two national sports, and much more. Take a closer look at Canadian symbolism in this special digital issue of Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for KidsLearn more

We Stand on Guard

By the First World War, “O Canada” was gradually being accepted as our national song. By the late 1920s, children were singing it in school and it was played or sung at most public events. Learn more

Decolonizing a Flag for a New Generation

In this lesson, students will examine the provincial and territorial flags of Canada, discuss what the symbols represent on each flag, and design their own updated flags. Learn more

Symbols in Fashion History

In this activity, students will examine a selection of nineteenth-century women’s gowns, and analyze how the tailoring, fabric, and trimmings of the gowns symbolize societal conceptions of femininity and women’s roles. Learn more

The First World War in Symbols

This activity asks students to analyze excerpts from The Listening Post and other First World War publications to discover what types of symbols were used for soldiers and civilians. Learn more

The Bluenose

Bluenose was designed by William J. Roué, a marine architect, built by Smith & Rhuland Shipyard of Lunenberg, and captained by sailor Angus Walters. Today it’s a national icon featured on the Canadian dime and a symbol of Nova Scotia’s legacy of shipbuilding excellence. Learn more

Four winners will receive a $500 RESP!

As part of the eleventh edition of the Young Citizens program, we are looking to welcome even more students into our nation-wide community of young storytellers. Students aged 10 to 18 are encouraged to produce a short video on the topic they explored as part of their virtual Heritage Fair project — or any other relevant social studies research project.

Videos are due no later than June 6, 2022. Starting June 10, Canadians will be able to vote for their favourite videos.

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© 2022 Canada’s History, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada

FREE Virtual School Programming and more!

This resource may be something that members wish to share with their local schools.


Sponsored by Canadian Museum of History / Canadian War Museum
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The Canadian Museum of History and the Canadian War Museum offer a wide range of learning opportunities that will fascinate students of all levels. Through historical artifacts, personal stories, artwork, photographs and interactive presentations, the Museum’s school programs help students discover Canada’s rich history.

The Museums are pleased to share that the virtual school programs are offered free of charge, thanks to the generosity of donors and the Friends of the Canadian War Museum.

CANADIAN MUSEUM
OF HISTORY

  • Virtual School Programs
  • History Box in the Classroom
  • Teachers’ Zone
  • CINÉ+ in Your Classroom
  • Online Resources
  • On-site School Visits

Learn more

CANADIAN WAR MUSEUM

  • Virtual School Programs
  • Supply Line Discovery Boxes
  • Remembrance Day
  • Online Resources
  • On-site School Visits

Learn more

TEACHERS’ CLUB

Enjoy multiple benefits and discover the countless ways we can support you in the classroom.
Join our Teachers’ Club — it’s free!

BOOK TODAY!
T 819-776-7014 or 1-800-555-5621 | F 819-776-8279
information@historymuseum.ca
100 Laurier Street, Gatineau QC
information@warmuseum.ca
1 Vimy Place, Ottawa ON
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© 2022 Canada’s History, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada