Tag Archives: Canada’s History

The beginning of the last hundred days…

A military history feature from Canada’s History magazine.


The Battle of Amiens, August 8, 1918
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The Hundred Days Offensive

Over the final month of the First World War, the Canadians would liberate the French cities of Cambrai and Valenciennes and, pushing a further seventy-five kilometres, reach the Belgian city of Mons. All told, the last hundred days of the war, including the Battle of Amiens and the Battle of Arras, cost the Canadians more than 45,000 dead and wounded, a staggering total. The soldiers’ sacrifice was critical to ending the war against Germany.

John Oliver

John Oliver was a stretcher-bearer with the 139th Machine Gun Battalion. In Arras, his unit was in the houses on one side of the street and the German soldiers were on the other side.
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James Herbert Gibson

The injuries James Gibson suffered at Arras prevented him from carrying on his family’s farming tradition. The German gunfire smashed three of his ribs and damaged his lungs.
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Thorarinn Finnbogason & Bjorn “Bud” Christianson

Arm in arm at Arras, Christianson carried the wounded soldier across the cacophony of mud away from the front, perhaps saving young Finnbogason’s life. Learn more

Hugh Cairns

In November 1918 Hugh Cairns launched a one-man assault, killing 12 Germans and capturing 18 more — checking the enemy’s advance. Learn more

A Father’s Grief

The Case of Captain Robert Bartholomew: Although many historical studies of the First World War have detailed the psychological stress and trauma endured by frontline soldiers, more research is also needed into the mental and emotional effect of the war on those on the home front. Read more

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Died 100 Years Ago

June 9, 1918

Joseph Kaeble was fatally wounded while defending a strong raid attempt.

August 1918

Laurence Edward Fry was killed on or around the fourth day of the Battle of Amiens.

August 1918

John MacDonald was killed in the Battle of Arras.

September 2, 1918

Edmund Earle Ingalls was killed in Arras, France.

October 1, 1918

Roderick Ogle Bell-Irving was caught in a German counter-attack and was killed.

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You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.

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‘Superb’ Arctic History | An Army of Nurses | Summer Reading Guide | Original Highways | Latest Top Sellers

Note several military history items in this edition of Canada’s History.


I think of life as a good book. The further you get into it the more it begins to make sense. – Harold Kushner
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Canada's History Reading Den

Northwest passages

Books reviewed in the June-July issue of Canada’s Historymagazine include Ken McGoogan’s Dead Reckoning: The Untold Story of the Northwest Passage. Reviewer Dave Obee calls the book “superb” and says it “reflects the increasing awareness and acknowledgement of Indigenous involvement in the exploration of the North, as well as rescue missions.”

Charlotte Gray reviews two books: Sarah Glasford’s Mobilizing Mercy: A History of the Canadian Red Cross and Linda J. Quiney’s This Small Army of Women: Canadian Volunteer Nurses and the First World War. And in the same issue Lyle Dick writes about Adam Shoalts’s A History of Canada in Ten Maps: Epic Stories of Charting a Mysterious Land and Barbara Mitchell’s Mapmaker: Philip Turnor in Rupert’s Land in the Age of Enlightenment.

Other books highlighted in this issue include Rivals for Power: Ottawa and the Provinces, by Ed Whitcomb; The Raftsmen, by Ryan Barnett, with illustrations by Dmitry Bondarenko; and The Endless Battle: The Fall of Hong Kong and Canadian POWs in Imperial Japan, by Andy Flanagan.

Our book reviews can be found both in Canada’s History magazine and on our CanadasHistory.cawebsite.

Travelling solo

Along with the many Canadian history titles released each year by dedicated publishers, we receive a handful of self-published books. On our website we’ve highlighted a selection of these books that includes stories of policing, immigration, mining, environmental catastrophes, and archaeological finds, as well as one historical fiction title. See the list here.

Highways to history

Recipients of the Reading Den are automatically entered to win a bundle of three Canadian-history books courtesy of Penguin Random House Canada. One winner will receive Ingenious: How Canadian Innovators Made the World Smarter, Smaller, Kinder, Safer, Healthier, Wealthier, and Happier, by David Johnston and Tom Jenkins, A History of Canada in Ten Maps: Epic Stories of Charting a Mysterious Land, by Adam Shoalts, and Original Highways: Travelling the Great Rivers of Canada, by Roy MacGregor.

Summer Reading Guide

The June-July issue ofCanada’s History magazine includes our annual Summer Reading Guide, which you can also browse online. Publishers showcase their latest Canadian history titles along with a books about food, politics, and travel, plus titles for young readers. You can purchase books by linking directly from the online edition of the Summer Reading Guide to our partner Chapters-Indigo.

Top 10 Bestsellers

  1. Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths
  2. Mapmaker: Philip Turnor in Rupert’s Land
  3. Travellers through Empire: Indigenous Voyages
  4. Art Deco Architecture Across Canada
  5. Nova Scotia’s Lost Communities
  6. The Raftsmen
  7. Canada’s Dream Shall Be of Them
  8. Ingenious: Canadian Innovators
  9. Innocent Heroes: Animals in the First World War
  10. Reluctant Warriors: Canadian Conscripts
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Copyright © 2018 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

WinnipegMB R3B 2E9

Canada

 

Last Chance! Secure Your Spot On The Great War Album Tour

From Canada’s History magazine.


Book your spot by June 15th!
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CANADA’S GREAT WAR ALBUM TOUR

Last chance — book by June 15, 2018!

Immerse yourself in the narrative of this historic region by travelling on this specially curated tour, created in partnership with Canada’s History and EF Go Ahead Tours, the world leader in international education.

Join Mark Collin Reid, Editor-in-Chief of Canada’s History and author of “Canada’s Great War Album,” as you make your way from the Vimy region to the Normandy Coast. By exploring the locations that were the backdrops for pivotal battles and attending on-tour lectures led by Reid, you’ll gain a new perspective on the events that took place throughout World War I.

Click here to reserve your spot now or call 1-800-719-9805.

Itinerary

Travel through the First and Second World historic sites.
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Mark Collin Reid

You will travel with Canada’s History magazine editor Mark Collin Reid.
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Your tour package includes

8 nights in handpicked hotels
8 breakfasts
5 dinners with beer or wine
Guided sightseeing tours
Expert Tour Director & local guides
Private deluxe motor coach

Tour Highlights

Vimy Ridge Memorial
In Flanders Fields Museum
Menin Gate Last Post Ceremony
Juno Beach Centre
Mont-Saint-Michel
Eiffel Tower photo stop

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Copyright © 2018 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

WinnipegMB R3B 2E9

Canada

Battle of the Atlantic Remembered | Banking on Canada | Pioneering Women | Our Latest Top Sellers

A newsletter from Canada’s history that contains a remembrance item.


“Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.” — John Locke
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Canada's History Reading Den

War at sea

On the first Sunday of May, Canada remembers the Second World War Battle of the Atlantic and recognizes the efforts and sacrifices of members of the Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Air Force, and Canadian merchant navy.

More than 4,000 Canadians perished during the battle, which was the Second World War’s longest continuous campaign.

In honour of the annual commemoration, we’ve selected a few of the best recently published books about Canada and the Battle of the Atlantic. See the list here.

Preserving the Allied lifeline

Many Canadian men and women were unsung heroes of the Battle of the Atlantic. With number of events and projects, Parks Canada is paying tribute to these extraordinary individuals and to all who served in the battle to supply Europe and to protect Canada’s coast during the Second World War. Learn more about upcoming events.

Financial progress

This spring we spoke to Joe Martin, who along with with Christopher Kobrak wrote From Wall Street to Bay Street: The Origins and Evolution of American and Canadian Finance. Our interview with Martin will appear in the June-July issue of Canada’s Historymagazine, but you can read it online now.

Martin will also speak about the book at a public event at the University of Winnipeg’s Convocation Hall on May 30, beginning at 4:00 p.m.

First Blood in the Gulf

In the June-July 2012 issue of Canada’s History, we featured an excerpt from Roger Sarty’s book War in the St. Lawrence: The Forgotten U-Boat Battles on Canada’s Shores.

For three years the Battle of the Atlantic spilled into Canadian waters — the only major combat to occur within Canada’s borders during the twentieth century. Read the excerpt.

Metis matriarchs

Recipients of the Reading Den are automatically entered to win one of three copies of Metis Pioneers: Marie Rose Delorme Smith and Isabella Clark Hardisty Lougheed, by Doris Jeanne MacKinnon, courtesy of University of Alberta Press. The book tells of two Metis women and the roles they played in the region that became the province of Alberta.

Book Giveaway Winners

Congratulations to:

  • Judith Nettleton, Toronto
  • Susan Ellwood, Ottawa
  • Adele Dostie, North York, Ont.

Community History webinar series

The Community History webinar series shares stories and experiences of communities from across Canada that have made significant efforts to preserve and to share their local histories. You can watch any of the six past webinars covering theatrical productions, massive online courses, poetry projects and more. Watch videos

You can also register for the last webinar in the series, the Wolfville Historical Society’s Mona Parsons Commemoration Project, with Andria Hill. Register now

Top 10 Bestsellers

  1. Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths
  2. Travellers through Empire: Indigenous Voyages
  3. Art Deco Architecture Across Canada
  4. Mapmaker: Philip Turnor in Rupert’s Land
  5. A History of Canada in Ten Maps
  6. The Halifax Explosion: Canada’s Worst Disaster
  7. The Whisky King: Canada’s Most Infamous Bootlegger
  8. Innocent Heroes: Animals in the First World War
  9. Reluctant Warriors: Canadian Conscripts
  10. Canada’s Odyssey: Incomplete Conquests
Start your subscription today and get your
first issue free!
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Book Giveaway Winners

Congratulations to:

  • Robert R., Toronto
  • Darryl G., Cobalt, Ont.
  • Kerry C., Waterloo, Ont.

Benefits of reading

When you link to Chapters-Indigo from this newsletter — or from book reviews and other items at CanadasHistory.ca — a portion of all online purchases is returned to Canada’s History to support our publishing and other programs.

Did you get this newsletter from a friend? Sign-up for your own and you’ll be eligible to win a FREE book!
We have five uniquely curated newsletters, including ones for teachers and in French. Sign Up Now
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Copyright © 2018 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous êtes membre ou parce que vous appartenez à la communauté d’esprit de la Société Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

WinnipegMB R3B 2E9

Canada