Category Archives: Canada’s History

The Vimy Pilgrimage Award

From the Canada’s History magazine.


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2019 Vimy Pilgrimage Award

Young Canadians, 14-17 years of age, who demonstrate a commitment to volunteer work through outstanding service, positive contributions, notable deeds, and bravery are eligible to apply for the Vimy Foundation’s annual Vimy Pilgrimage Award. The Award is a fully-funded immersive educational program in Belgium and France to study Canada’s tremendous First World War effort.

The 2019 program, scheduled for April 2–10, will feature interactive education and visits to significant First World War sites, museums, cemeteries, historic battlefields, and memorials including the Canadian National Vimy Memorial. Twenty youth from across Canada will be selected to explore our nation’s history abroad.

Deadline: Sunday, November 18, 2018, at 11:59pm (Pacific).

Additional questions? Email programs@vimyfoundation.ca

Apply Here!

Apply Now

There will be twenty awards available consisting of a fully-funded, week-long educational program for one to Belgium and France.

Itinerary

The itinerary includes museum, cemetery, historic site and battlefield visits. Read the full itinerary.

Thank you to Scotiabank for their generous support of the Vimy Pilgrimage Award. Scotiabank aims to support organizations that are committed to helping young people reach their infinite potential, and has been investing in Canadian communities for 185 years.

Air Canada is proud to support our youth and tomorrow’s leaders by sponsoring the 2019 Vimy Pilgrimage Award, allowing 20 exceptional teenagers from across Canada to learn and remember.
Thank you to Canada’s National History Society for their ongoing support of the Vimy Pilgrimage Award.
Canada's History
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Talking about war and peace in the classroom

Another item from Canada’s History that features several World War I and veterans items.


Periods of peace and conflict in Canadian history
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Ride the rails of Northern Ontario this winter!
Canada's History

Remembering the Great War

This Remembrance Day marks the centennial of the end of the Great War. Check out this list of resources — from lesson plans to podcasts — to explore the First World War and its legacy with your students.
Learn more

Peacemakers, peacekeepers, and peacebuilders

The November-December 2009 issue of Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for Kids was all about peace! Check out the article “Pearson and the Blue Berets” to learn more about Canada’s history of peacekeeping.
Read more

Veterans’ Week

During Veterans’ Week, from November 5 to 11, many Canadians will remember and honour those who served our country, as well as those who serve today. Veterans Affairs Canada offers a suite of learning materials for students to explore the idea of remembrance.
Learn more

The Battle of Hill 70

In August 1917, the Canadian Corps launched a campaign to capture the strategic high point of Hill 70.
Bring this story into your classroom using the Battle of Hill 70 Memorial Project’s educational resources.
Learn more 

More than a mascot

Share the story of Sergeant Bill, a Saskatchewan goat who earned medals in the First World War for capturing an enemy soldier and saving his own men from an explosion.
Read more

Kayak makes a great gift!
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Children of Conflict | A Peek Under the First Parliament Building | Raid on Blécourt | History of Thanksgiving

A couple of World War I items in this edition of Canada’s History.


Plus: Stories from the First World War
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Northern Ontario Winter Rails - Reserve now!
Canada's History

Children of Conflict

Although Canadian children spent the war years far from the front lines, they were not mere bystanders to history — they were also active participants in a global conflict that forever altered their lives. Read more

Raid on Blécourt

Courageous Canadian action results in mass capture of Germans during the 100 Days Campaign. Read more

Grey War, No More

A colourization project breathes new life into First World War images. Read more

War of Words

Learn how propaganda was used to sway public opinion during the First World War. Read more

History of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving in Canada has its own history, separate from our American counterparts. Read more

A Peek Under the First Parliament Building

When surveys confirmed the site of Canada’s first Parliament building in Montreal, it was like archaeologists had struck gold. With over half a million pieces collected, Pointe-à-Callière has gained incredible insight into what went on in that building. Watch now

Give Kayak: A great gift for kids ages 7-12!

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Family historians – make the most of your holiday gatherings!

From Canada’s History magazine.


Take an eclectic approach to learning. There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to genealogy.
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Give the greatest gift in history!
Canada's History

Discovering the Details

Public records and family letters allow us to tell nuanced stories about Great War combatants. Read more

Family (History) Counselling

Take an eclectic approach to learning. There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to genealogy. Read now

Seeing Double

Most babies arrive nine months after conception. For Malcolm Reid it was nine months after his mother’s death. Read more

 

Coming Clean

There’s much to ponder before airing family secrets. Read more

Genealogy Can be Child’s Play

Hip tips for making family history cool for kids. Read more

Dangers Lurk in Photo Albums

Attempts to conserve your family keepsakes may actually hasten their demise. Read now

October-November issue: The War Ends

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Freethinker | Soldier Culture | Viking Hoax | Wartime Election | History Top Sellers

From Canada’s History magazine.


“A children’s story that can only be enjoyed by children is not a good children’s story in the slightest.” — C.S. Lewis
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Canada's History Reading Den

Cover of FreethinkerNot so quiet

In the August-September issue of Canada’s Historymagazine, former Ontario premier Bob Rae reviews Unbuttoned: A History of Mackenzie King’s Secret Life, by Christopher Dummitt. Rae notes that prime minister “William Lyon Mackenzie King never intended that his daily log would become a public document,” but it was nonetheless saved by the executors of his will. Regarding Unbuttoned, Rae says, “Dummitt has written a fascinating book on the Mackenzie King diaries, and in doing so he has also provided much insight into King and the history of his reputation.”

In the same issue, history professor Graham Broad reviews Embattled Nation: Canada’s Wartome Election of 1917, by Patrice Dutil and David MacKenzie. Broad writes that the authors “take pains to situate the political failings of Prime Minister Robert Borden and aging Opposition leader Wilfrid Laurier in the context of the era’s complex questions of language, national identity, and war.”

Meanwhile, award-winning author Ryan O’Connor tells about Freethinker: The Life and Works of Éva Circé-Côté, by Andrée Lévesque. O’Connor says the book originally published in French in 2010 is important in part because, besides being a librarian, poet, and journalist, Circé-Côté was one of the overshadowed intellectual predecessors to Quebec’s Quiet Revolution. “She was deeply concerned about the survival of her people’s language and culture, but this did not make her a separatist,” because, O’Connor writes, “she feared an even greater concentration of power in the hands of the clergy should Quebec leave Canada.”

Among our shorter More Books items, we consider two books on the history of Indigenous rights in Canada —Price Paid: The Fight for First Nations Survival, by Bev Sellars, and Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History, by Arthur J. Ray — as well as Darryl Raymaker’s Trudeau’s Tango: Alberta Meets Pierre Elliott Trudeau, 1968–1972and Madelyn Holmes’ Working for the Common Good: Canadian Women Politicians.

You can read our reviews both in the Canada’s Historymagazine and on our CanadasHistory.ca website.

Down time

Also in the August-September issue, we speak with military historian Tim Cook, author of The Secret History of Soldiers: How Canadians Survived the Great War. Cook says his new book looks at how soldiers spent their free time while coping with the difficulties of the First World War. “The use of culture as a shield, the creation of a unique soldier society to cope and endure, is not part of the official record,” Cook said. You can read a longer version of the interview on our CanadasHistory.ca website.

Cover of BeardmoreBelieve it or not

Recipients of the Reading Den are automatically entered to win one of three copies of Douglas Hunter’s new book, Beardmore: The Viking Hoax That Rewrote History, courtesy of McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Westray: My Journey from Darkness to Light
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Top 10 Bestsellers

  1. Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths
  2. Art Deco Architecture Across Canada
  3. Mapmaker: Philip Turnor in Rupert’s Land
  4. Travellers through Empire: Indigenous Voyages
  5. The Endless Battle: The Fall of Hong Kong
  6. Ingenious: Canadian Innovators
  7. Canada’s Dream Shall Be of Them
  8. The Raftsmen
  9. Nova Scotia’s Lost Communities
  10. The Whisky King: Canada’s Most Infamous Bootlegger
Cover of August-September 2018 issue - The Dust Bowl
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Cover of Unbuttoned

Book Giveaway Winners

Congratulations to:

  • Bill Hines, Toronto
  • Sherri Kajiwara, Burnaby, BC
  • L. Anderson
Cover of Traveller's Through Empire

Book Giveaway Winners

Congratulations to:

  • Anne N.
  • Lanson and Karen H.
  • David G.
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Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

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The beginning of the last hundred days…

A military history feature from Canada’s History magazine.


The Battle of Amiens, August 8, 1918
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The Hundred Days Offensive

Over the final month of the First World War, the Canadians would liberate the French cities of Cambrai and Valenciennes and, pushing a further seventy-five kilometres, reach the Belgian city of Mons. All told, the last hundred days of the war, including the Battle of Amiens and the Battle of Arras, cost the Canadians more than 45,000 dead and wounded, a staggering total. The soldiers’ sacrifice was critical to ending the war against Germany.

John Oliver

John Oliver was a stretcher-bearer with the 139th Machine Gun Battalion. In Arras, his unit was in the houses on one side of the street and the German soldiers were on the other side.
Read more

James Herbert Gibson

The injuries James Gibson suffered at Arras prevented him from carrying on his family’s farming tradition. The German gunfire smashed three of his ribs and damaged his lungs.
Learn more

Thorarinn Finnbogason & Bjorn “Bud” Christianson

Arm in arm at Arras, Christianson carried the wounded soldier across the cacophony of mud away from the front, perhaps saving young Finnbogason’s life. Learn more

Hugh Cairns

In November 1918 Hugh Cairns launched a one-man assault, killing 12 Germans and capturing 18 more — checking the enemy’s advance. Learn more

A Father’s Grief

The Case of Captain Robert Bartholomew: Although many historical studies of the First World War have detailed the psychological stress and trauma endured by frontline soldiers, more research is also needed into the mental and emotional effect of the war on those on the home front. Read more

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Died 100 Years Ago

June 9, 1918

Joseph Kaeble was fatally wounded while defending a strong raid attempt.

August 1918

Laurence Edward Fry was killed on or around the fourth day of the Battle of Amiens.

August 1918

John MacDonald was killed in the Battle of Arras.

September 2, 1918

Edmund Earle Ingalls was killed in Arras, France.

October 1, 1918

Roderick Ogle Bell-Irving was caught in a German counter-attack and was killed.

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Canada

‘Superb’ Arctic History | An Army of Nurses | Summer Reading Guide | Original Highways | Latest Top Sellers

Note several military history items in this edition of Canada’s History.


I think of life as a good book. The further you get into it the more it begins to make sense. – Harold Kushner
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Canada's History Reading Den

Northwest passages

Books reviewed in the June-July issue of Canada’s Historymagazine include Ken McGoogan’s Dead Reckoning: The Untold Story of the Northwest Passage. Reviewer Dave Obee calls the book “superb” and says it “reflects the increasing awareness and acknowledgement of Indigenous involvement in the exploration of the North, as well as rescue missions.”

Charlotte Gray reviews two books: Sarah Glasford’s Mobilizing Mercy: A History of the Canadian Red Cross and Linda J. Quiney’s This Small Army of Women: Canadian Volunteer Nurses and the First World War. And in the same issue Lyle Dick writes about Adam Shoalts’s A History of Canada in Ten Maps: Epic Stories of Charting a Mysterious Land and Barbara Mitchell’s Mapmaker: Philip Turnor in Rupert’s Land in the Age of Enlightenment.

Other books highlighted in this issue include Rivals for Power: Ottawa and the Provinces, by Ed Whitcomb; The Raftsmen, by Ryan Barnett, with illustrations by Dmitry Bondarenko; and The Endless Battle: The Fall of Hong Kong and Canadian POWs in Imperial Japan, by Andy Flanagan.

Our book reviews can be found both in Canada’s History magazine and on our CanadasHistory.cawebsite.

Travelling solo

Along with the many Canadian history titles released each year by dedicated publishers, we receive a handful of self-published books. On our website we’ve highlighted a selection of these books that includes stories of policing, immigration, mining, environmental catastrophes, and archaeological finds, as well as one historical fiction title. See the list here.

Highways to history

Recipients of the Reading Den are automatically entered to win a bundle of three Canadian-history books courtesy of Penguin Random House Canada. One winner will receive Ingenious: How Canadian Innovators Made the World Smarter, Smaller, Kinder, Safer, Healthier, Wealthier, and Happier, by David Johnston and Tom Jenkins, A History of Canada in Ten Maps: Epic Stories of Charting a Mysterious Land, by Adam Shoalts, and Original Highways: Travelling the Great Rivers of Canada, by Roy MacGregor.

Summer Reading Guide

The June-July issue ofCanada’s History magazine includes our annual Summer Reading Guide, which you can also browse online. Publishers showcase their latest Canadian history titles along with a books about food, politics, and travel, plus titles for young readers. You can purchase books by linking directly from the online edition of the Summer Reading Guide to our partner Chapters-Indigo.

Top 10 Bestsellers

  1. Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths
  2. Mapmaker: Philip Turnor in Rupert’s Land
  3. Travellers through Empire: Indigenous Voyages
  4. Art Deco Architecture Across Canada
  5. Nova Scotia’s Lost Communities
  6. The Raftsmen
  7. Canada’s Dream Shall Be of Them
  8. Ingenious: Canadian Innovators
  9. Innocent Heroes: Animals in the First World War
  10. Reluctant Warriors: Canadian Conscripts
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Copyright © 2018 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
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Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

WinnipegMB R3B 2E9

Canada