Category Archives: Canada’s History

A Time to Reflect ūüćĀ

There are several items in this issue of¬†Canada’s History magazine related to remembrance.


#LestWeForget
View this email in your browser
Canada's History
Captain Harry Crerar, front row, second from the left.

The New Face of War

While not graphically descriptive, Harry Crerar was more than willing to paint a realistic picture of his experiences during the First World War ‚ÄĒ and as the battery’s censor, he was able to give more information than most.¬†Originally published in October 1995.¬†Read more

Veteran's Week Learning Materials from Veterans Affairs Canada
Soldiers celebrate VE Day.

End of the Second World War

In the August-September 2020 issue of Canada’s History, we commemorated the seventy-fifth anniversary marking the end of the Second World War. For this Remembrance Day, we curated a collection of online articles, audio, images and video about the Second World War. Read more

Illustration of a soldier accepting tulips from a child.

Canada and the Second World War

From farms to factories to fighting, this edition of¬†Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for Kids¬†looks at¬†how¬†the Second World War touched Canadians in many ways.¬†Read more

Book cover of Recipes for Victory.

Remembrance Day Reading

Browse Canadian history titles that focus on military history. Read more

One soldier carries another on his back.

The War to End All War

November 2018 marked the one hundredth anniversary of the end of the First World War. A century later, the conflict continues to affect us ‚ÄĒ even if we don‚Äôt fully realize it. Explore a collection of articles, audio, images and video about the Great War from the past ten years.¬†Learn more

Start your subscription today and get your first issue free!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Canada’s History Archive featuring The Beaver

Please note:¬†Some items featured in our newsletters and social media will include links to the Canada‚Äôs History Archive.¬†The Beaver¬†magazine was founded, and for decades was published, during eras shaped by colonialism. Concepts such as racial, cultural, or gender equality were rarely, if ever, considered by the magazine or its contributors. In earlier issues, readers will find comments and terms now considered to be derogatory. Canada‚Äôs History Society cautions readers to explore the archive using¬†historical thinking concepts¬†‚ÄĒ not only analyzing the content but asking questions of who shaped the content and why.
Did you get this newsletter from a friend? Sign up for your own and you’ll be eligible to win a FREE book!
We have five uniquely curated newsletters, including ones for teachers and in French. Sign Up Now
Share Share
Tweet Tweet
Forward Forward
View this email in your browser

Copyright ¬© 2020 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous √™tes membre ou parce que vous appartenez √† la communaut√© d‚Äôesprit de la Soci√©t√© Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada

Classroom resources for Remembrance Day

Several military items in this issue of Canada’s History, along with the classroom resources for Remembrance Day at the top.


View this email in your browser
Use these resources to initiate conversations about Canada’s role in the First and Second World Wars and ask students to contemplate why we mark Remembrance Day each year.
Canada's History

After Victory: The Legacy of the Necessary War

The Canada we know today, and a large part of our Canadian identity, has been shaped by wartime service and sacrifice. The aftermath of war brings a mix of emotions: relief and joy for some, unending pain and trauma for others, and for all a period of turmoil and uncertainty. Read more

Children’s Opera

In this Teaching Canada’s History podcast, Dawn Martens shares how her students commemorated the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz by studying and performing Hans Krása’s opera Brundibár. Listen here

Bomb Girls: Defense Industries Limited and the Home Front

This lesson examines the contributions of women working at Defence Industries Limited. Students collect data about the role, impact, and experiences of the women known as the Bomb Girls. Learn more

The Canadian Patriotic Fund, 1914‚Äď1919

A large part of the war effort during the First World War was dedicated to fundraising and relief. In this lesson, students consider the role of the Canadian Patriotic Fund, which provided support to the wives and dependents of soldiers. Learn more

Canada and the Second World War

The April 2020 issue of Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for Kids is an excellent resource for reflecting on and remembering Canadians’ wartime contributions. Discover lesson plans, classroom activities, and more, all related to the Second World War. Learn more

Home Front Hero

The lesser-known stories of those who helped the war effort include that of one Inuk woman. Qapik Attagutsiak contributed to Canada’s Second World War effort in a unique way and has been recognized by the government of Canada. Read more

Advertisement

Canada’s History Archive featuring The Beaver

Please note:¬†Some items featured in our newsletters and social media will include links to the Canada‚Äôs History Archive.¬†The Beaver¬†magazine was founded, and for decades was published, during eras shaped by colonialism. Concepts such as racial, cultural, or gender equality were rarely, if ever, considered by the magazine or its contributors. In earlier issues, readers will find comments and terms now considered to be derogatory. Canada‚Äôs History Society cautions readers to explore the archive using¬†historical thinking concepts¬†‚ÄĒ not only analyzing the content but asking questions of who shaped the content and why.
Did you get this newsletter from a friend? Sign up for your own and you’ll be eligible to win a FREE book!
We have five uniquely curated newsletters, including ones for teachers and in French. Sign Up Now
Share Share
Tweet Tweet
Forward Forward
View this email in your browser

Copyright ¬© 2020 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous √™tes membre ou parce que vous appartenez √† la communaut√© d‚Äôesprit de la Soci√©t√© Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada

Historical Fiction | Lennon and Ono in Canada | Our Latest Top Sellers

This is a newsletter from¬†Canada’s History magazine and it is the “Veterans Week Learning Materials” that is the reason we are sharing this item.


‚ÄúShow me a family of readers, and I will show you the people who move the world.‚ÄĚ ‚ÄĒ Napol√©on Bonaparte
View this email in your browser
Canada's History Reading Den

Cover of Five Little Indians.Engaging novels

Many Canadian writers explore the country’s history through novels and other creative writing. In the first of a few reading lists this fall, we present a dozen recent examples of Canadian historical fiction.

Michelle Good’s Five Little Indians, which follows teenagers in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside after their release from a residential school, is a finalist for the Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and was longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize.

In Forest Green, Governor General’s Award-winning author Kate Pullinger reaches back to the effects of the Great Depression and the Second World War upon a young man from British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley. Meanwhile, in The Place, Gary Collins explores life and crime in an isolated outport on the northeast coast of Newfoundland beginning late in the nineteenth century.

Other recently published books include stories about an artist at a prairie mental asylum, the decline of a wealthy Montreal family, and a young Irish immigrant to Canada.

Explore the list of recent historical fiction here.

Veterans' Week Learning Materials #CanadaRemembers

Cover of John Lennon, Yoko Ono and the Year Canada Was Cool.In-bed reading

Recipients of the Reading Den are automatically entered to win one of three copies of John Lennon, Yoko Ono and the Year Canada Was Cool, by Greg Marquis, courtesy of James Lorimer & Company. The book uses the couple’s 1969 bed-in for peace at an upscale Montreal hotel to offer a unique portrayal of Canadian society in the late 1960s.

Top 10 Bestsellers

  1. Strangers in the House: A Prairie Story
  2. 21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act
  3. Iroquois in the West
  4. No Surrender: The Land Remains Indigenous
  5. Recipes for Victory: Great War Food
  6. The Wake: Deadly Legacy of a Newfoundland Tsunami
  7. Stories Were Not Told: First World War Internment Camps
  8. Seeking the Fabled City: Canadian Jewish Experience
  9. Gaawin Gindaaswin Ndaawsii / I Am Not a Number
  10. Psychiatry and the Legacies of Eugenics
Cover of the October-November 2020 issue of Canada's History.
Start your subscription today and get your
first issue free!
Subscribe Now
Cover of All 'Bout Canada

Book Giveaway Winners

Congratulations to:

  • Natalka P., Southampton, Ont.
  • Margaret L., North Vancouver, B.C.
  • Ron Hanlin, Georgetown, Ont.

Canada’s History Archive featuring The Beaver

Please note:¬†Some items featured in our newsletters and social media will include links to the Canada‚Äôs History Archive.¬†The Beaver¬†magazine was founded, and for decades was published, during eras shaped by colonialism. Concepts such as racial, cultural, or gender equality were rarely, if ever, considered by the magazine or its contributors. In earlier issues, readers will find comments and terms now considered to be derogatory. Canada‚Äôs History Society cautions readers to explore the archive using¬†historical thinking concepts¬†‚ÄĒ not only analyzing the content but asking questions of who shaped the content and why.
Did you get this newsletter from a friend? Sign up for your own and you’ll be eligible to win a FREE book!
We have five uniquely curated newsletters, including ones for teachers and in French. Sign Up Now
Share Share
Tweet Tweet
Forward Forward
View this email in your browser

Copyright ¬© 2020 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous √™tes membre ou parce que vous appartenez √† la communaut√© d‚Äôesprit de la Soci√©t√© Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada

Canada’s contributions to the world

Note the items related to the Korean War, first aid during World War I, the Cold War and Pugwash, and the conflict in Afghanistan in this newsletter.


Plus: Hope Amid the Ruins, Peace in Pugwash and First Aid
View this email in your browser
Reserve your spot and ride the rails! Heritage of Halifax and the sinking of the RMS Titanic.
Canada's History
Charles Best (left) and Frederick Banting (right).

Made in Canada ‚ÄĒ Insulin

Frederick Banting, Charles Best, and James Bertram Collip perfected the extraction of insulin leading to a treatment for people with diabetes. Watch now

Canadian light infantry on board a ship for Korea.

Korea: 1951

It is known as the ‚ÄúForgotten War,‚ÄĚ but Canada‚Äôs role in Korea should be anything but forgotten. Read more

Canadian Joe Boyle with the Queen and Princess of Romania.

First Aid

Old-fashioned chivalry drove one Canadian’s heroic efforts to help Romania after the First World War. Originally published in February 2012Read more

Group photo with participants of the Pugwash conference.

Pugwash Gives Peace a Chance

Visitors to the small village of Pugwash, Nova Scotia, might not imagine that in the midst of the Cold War it played host to one of the most important scientific conferences of the era. Originally published in October 2007Read more

Writer Matthew Fisher in Afghanistan.

Hope Amid the Ruins

A veteran foreign correspondant in Afghanistan reports on Canada’s role in rebuilding the war-torn nation. Originally published in April 2012Read more

Emmanuel Jal, left, with Lieutenant General Roméo Dallaire (retired).

Marching Orders

By Lieutenant General Rom√©o Dallaire (retired): Perhaps the most powerful demonstration of true statesmanship and forward-thinking leadership to which we could commit ourselves as a country would be taking on the reform of the United Nations. Read more

Start your subscription today and get your first issue free!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Canada’s History Archive featuring The Beaver

Please note: Some items featured in our newsletters and social media will include links to the Canada‚Äôs History Archive. The Beaver magazine was founded, and for decades was published, during eras shaped by colonialism. Concepts such as racial, cultural, or gender equality were rarely, if ever, considered by the magazine or its contributors. In earlier issues, readers will find comments and terms now considered to be derogatory. Canada‚Äôs History Society cautions readers to explore the archive using historical thinking concepts ‚ÄĒ not only analyzing the content but asking questions of who shaped the content and why.
Did you get this newsletter from a friend? Sign up for your own and you‚Äôll be eligible to win a FREE book!
We have five uniquely curated newsletters, including ones for teachers and in French. Sign Up Now
Share Share
Tweet Tweet
Forward Forward
View this email in your browser

Copyright ¬© 2020 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous √™tes membre ou parce que vous appartenez √† la communaut√© d‚Äôesprit de la Soci√©t√© Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada

After Victory and into the Cold War

An item from¬†Canada’s History magazine.


75 years since the end of the Second World War
View this email in your browser
Subscribe to Canada's History and get a FREE issue!
Canada's History
Boy reaches for his father's hand as he marches in a line of soldiers.

On All Fronts

From the home front to the front lines, Canadians everywhere did their bit to help the Allies win the Second World War. Read more

Explore VE Day with Defining Moments Canada
Playing card with plane diagram.

All Hands on Decks

Playing cards helped Second World War flight crews to recognize airborne friends from foes. Read more

After Victory: The Legacy of the Necessary War

The Second World War led to fundamental changes to Canada, ushering in a new country forged by a generation’s service and sacrifice. Read more

Dawn Martens: 2020 Finalist for Governor General’s Award

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, Dawn Martens led students in studying and performing Hans Krása’s opera Brundibar. Listen now

Svetlana and Evy Gouzenko, both at the age of 24.

Gouzenko Deciphered

Warm memories of a Cold War family with Evy Wilson, the daughter of Igor and Svetlana Gouzenko. In this interview she discusses her parents’ histories, courage, and impact on the 75th anniversary of their defection and escape. Listen now

Start your subscription today and get your first issue free!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Canada’s History Archive featuring The Beaver

Please note:¬†Some items featured in our newsletters and social media will include links to the Canada‚Äôs History Archive.¬†The Beaver¬†magazine was founded, and for decades was published, during eras shaped by colonialism. Concepts such as racial, cultural, or gender equality were rarely, if ever, considered by the magazine or its contributors. In earlier issues, readers will find comments and terms now considered to be derogatory. Canada‚Äôs History Society cautions readers to explore the archive using¬†historical thinking concepts¬†‚ÄĒ not only analyzing the content but asking questions of who shaped the content and why.
Did you get this newsletter from a friend? Sign up for your own and you’ll be eligible to win a FREE book!
We have five uniquely curated newsletters, including ones for teachers and in French. Sign Up Now
Share Share
Tweet Tweet
Forward Forward
View this email in your browser

Copyright ¬© 2020 Canada’s History, all rights reserved.
You are receiving this email as a member or friend of Canada’s History. / Vous recevez ce courriel parce que vous √™tes membre ou parce que vous appartenez √† la communaut√© d‚Äôesprit de la Soci√©t√© Histoire Canada.

Our mailing address is:

Canada’s History

Main Floor Bryce Hall, 515 Portage Avenue

Winnipeg, MB R3B 2E9

Canada