New details emerge in the case for the first Canadian Victoria Cross

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Legion Magazine
Front Lines
New details emerge in the case for the first Canadian Victoria Cross

New details emerge in the case for the first Canadian Victoria Cross

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

Private Jess Randall Larochelle of the Royal Canadian Regiment was in an observation post when it was destroyed by a rocket propelled grenade during an enemy attack on the position in Pashmul, Afghanistan. It was Oct. 14, 2006.

Manning a C6 machine gun—known as “the bullet magnet” because the enemy always looks to disable it first—Larochelle was knocked unconscious by the blast. Two members of his section were killed and three others wounded.

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Canada and the liberation of the Netherlands

“Canada and the liberation of the Netherlands” wins Gold for the Best Interactive Story 2020

Legion Magazine’s interactive website Canada and the liberation of Netherlands wins Gold from the Canadian Online Publishing Awards. The site explores how in the final months of the Second World War, Canadian forces were assigned to liberate the Netherlands from Nazi occupation.
View rare photographs, videos and
interactive battle maps by visiting legionmagazine.com/Liberation-of-Netherlands

 

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The October Crisis

“The October Crisis” wins Silver for the Best Interactive Story 2020

Legion Magazine’s interactive website The October Crisis wins Silver
from the Canadian Online Publishing Awards. 
The site revisits the crisis of October 1970, when the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) kidnapped British Trade Commissioner James Cross and Quebec Labour Minister Pierre Laporte. In response, Canada’s armed forces were deployed in Quebec and Ontario.
You can explore rare photographs, timelines, memoirs and
opinions by visiting legionmagazine.com/theoctobercrisis

 

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The Great Canadiana 4-Pack
Military Milestones
homesick, seasick and lovesick

Homesick, seasick and lovesick

Story by Sharon Adams

The ocean liner SS Mauritania docked at Pier 21 in Halifax on Feb. 10, 1946, filled with women described in the media as homesick, seasick and lovesick.

War brides.

The vessel was the first of the bride ships, which by 1947 had carried more than 44,000 women and about 21,000 children to new lives in Canada.

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Arbor Alliance
Canvet Publication Ltd.

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