Category Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

Upcoming events: Poetry, music, & cross-border finances for teens

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Next event: Studying Religious Symbols and Bias in Court Proceedings
  • Poetry reading & talk by Canadian poet Cecily Nicholson
  • Money Talks: Cross-Border Finances for Your Kids
  • Remembrance Day Ceremony
  • Stanford Live presents: Indigenous country-folk musician William Prince
UPCOMING EVENT
Studying Religious Symbols and Bias in Court Proceedings
November 9 | 12:30 pm | 223 Moses Hall | RSVP here
Canadian Studies Sproul Fellow Nicholas A. R. Fraser will discuss research that examines bias against religious minorities within Canadian judicial procedures. Using original experimental data gathered in collaboration with Colton Fehr (Simon Fraser University), Dr. Fraser will use the example of courtroom oaths as a window into how Canadian cultural expectations can subtly affect an immigrant’s experience of “integration.”
Nicholas A. R. Fraser is a John R. Sproul Research Fellow with the Canadian Studies Program. He is a political scientist specializing in the impact of organizational culture on policy application. He holds M.A.s from the University of British Columbia and Waseda University (Japan), and received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto, where he was previously an associate at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.
This event will be held in-person at UC Berkeley; however, a live webcast will be available for those who would prefer to attend virtually. Please RSVP for more details.
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Holloway Poetry Series/Mixed Blood Talk: Cecily Nicholson
Lecture: October 20 | 4:00 pm | Online | RSVP
Reading: October 21 | 6:30 pm | Online | RSVP
The UC Berkeley English Department invites you to two events featuring Canadian poet Cecily Nicholson. Nicholson’s most recent book, Wayside Sang, explores ideas of borders and identity as she retraces her father’s journeys through the Great Lakes region. It won the Governor General’s Award for English Poetry in 2018. Her previous book, From the Poplars, won British Columbia’s Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize in 2015.
Nicholson will give this year’s Mixed Blood Talk, titled “real/located and restorative poetics – once a black rurality”, on October 20. The next day, October 21, she will give her Holloway poetry reading with Berkeley graduate student poet Laura Ritland.
The Holloway Series in Poetry is sponsored by the UC Berkeley Department of English and honors one distinguished poet each year with a residency. The Mixed Blood Project is a poetry journal and organization founded and led by Canadian Studies faculty affiliate Cecil S. Giscombe. The series spotlights the contemporary African-American avant-garde, and emphasizes literary innovation with a deliberate and very aggressive emphasis on race and the languages of and about race.
DML Chesterfield Chat: Money Talks: Cross-Border Finances and Your Kids and Teens
October 27 | 4:00 pm | Online | RSVP
Talking to kids and teens about money is always challenging. But when families also have to navigate US-Canada financial and banking challenges, things can get really complicated!
Join DML host (and Canadian Studies board chair) David Stewart and our expert panel as they discuss tips and strategies on how to get your kids comfortable with financial planning and how to unpack some of the technical challenges of moving money across the border to cover budget needs, Canadian university tuition, or other cross-border family needs.
Panelists include Heather Pelant, partner and Certified Financial Planner at Baker Street Advisors; Matt Altro, president & CEO at MCA Cross Border Advisors; and Marlene Atzori, Regional Advisor Cross Border Banking at RBC Bank.
Remembrance Day Ceremony
November 11 | 10:00 am | Petaluma, CA
Join US Branch 25 of the Royal Canadian Legion (representing the San Francisco Bay Area) for their annual Remembrance Day Service from Liberty Cemetery in Petaluma, California. The annual service will be streamed live from the cemetery through Zoom webinar and can be watched by registering here.
Stanford Live Presents: William Prince
November 11 | 7:00 & 9:00 pm | Stanford University | Buy tickets
Enjoy an evening with Manitoba-based Indigenous Canadian folk and country musician William Prince in a special Stanford Live performance cosponsored by the Digital Moose Lounge. A singer-songwriter of magnitude, Prince has earned critical accolades for his synthesis of country and gospel music with acoustic guitar and messages about the human condition.
Please note that all attendees must wear a mask and bring proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of attendance.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Happy Thanksgiving! 🦃 Plus: Nobel Prize; Making middle-class multiculturalism

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Happy Thanksgiving from Canadian Studies!
  • Book talk tomorrow: Making Middle Class Multiculturalism
  • In the news: Faculty affiliate David Card wins Nobel Prize in economics
  • Pres. Biden recognizes Indigenous Peoples’ Day, which started in Berkeley
  • Photos: Our 4th Annual Canadian Family Thanksgiving
🍁 Happy Thanksgiving to Canadians Near and Far! 🍁
Dear Friends,
On behalf of all of us at Canadian Studies, I would like to wish a joyful (Canadian) Thanksgiving to you and your families. Here in Berkeley, we have a lot to be grateful for. With the pandemic winding down in California, we’re slowly returning to life as normal. We were even able to celebrate Thanksgiving in-person this weekend with members of the Bay Area’s Canadian Community for the first time in two years – see the pictures below! The day takes on particular poignancy as it also falls on Indigenous Peoples’ Day here in the US, a tradition that started in the city of Berkeley.
As we give thanks, we are most grateful for all of your support through these difficult times. We’ve really seen the value of a strong community over the last two years. I’m so proud to say that we have built such a community around Canadian Studies, because it’s your interest and encouragement that keeps us moving forward. We couldn’t do it without you.
With best wishes for a happy and delicious holiday,
Irene Bloemraad
Program Director
TOMORROW
Book Talk: Making Middle-Class Multiculturalism: Immigration Bureaucrats and Policymaking in Postwar Canada
October 12 | 12:30 pm PT | Online | RSVP here
In the 1950s and 1960s, immigration bureaucrats played an important yet unacknowledged role in transforming Canada’s immigration policy. Their perceptions and judgements about the admissibility of individuals influenced the creation of formal admissions criteria for skilled workers and family immigrants that continue to shape immigration to Canada. Bureaucrats emphasized not just economic utility, but also middle-class traits and values such as wealth accumulation, educational attainment, entrepreneurial spirit, resourcefulness and a strong work ethic. By making “middle-class multiculturalism” a basis of nation-building in Canada, they created a much-admired approach to managing racial diversity that has nevertheless generated significant social inequalities. Migration expert Jennifer Elrick will discuss insights from her forthcoming book examining the topic.
Jennifer Elrick is an assistant professor of sociology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. Her research interests lie in the area of state classifications (in censuses and immigration policy) and their relationship to social stratification along the lines of race, gender, and social class. Her work is multi-national in scope, focusing on Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom.
IN THE NEWS
Faculty Affiliate David Card Wins Nobel Prize in Economics
Canadian Studies is proud to announce that David Card, a UC Berkeley economist and Canadian Studies faculty affiliate, was awarded half of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. The award recognizes his pioneering research in the field of labour economics, which has been hailed as “revolutionary”. We hope you will join us in congratulating Professor Card for this monumental achievement.
Born in Canada, Professor Card has taught at Berkeley for over twenty years. His research focuses on inequality and growth; his best-known work includes studies that challenged prevailing orthodoxies on the negative impacts of a higher minimum wage on employment figures, and of immigration on the wages of native-born workers.
Hear Professor Card’s reaction to the news and his thoughts on the policy implications of his research in a post-announcement interview with the Nobel Committee’s Adam Smith.
President Biden Recognizes Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Which Started in Berkeley
Today, Americans honor the Native people of our country, their diverse cultures, and their numerous contributions to our history and society. It is also a time to reflect on the historical and present treatment of Indigenous peoples in the United States, and celebrate their resilience as vibrant, modern communities.
This year’s celebration bears special significance, as it is the first time the holiday has been formally recognized by the federal government. Berkeley was the first US city to officially celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day in 1992. The decision grew out of debates over the commemoration of the 500th Anniversary of Columbus’ arrival in the Americas and traditional Columbus Day celebrations, which many felt did not accurately account for the impact of European colonization on Native American communities. As a result, Berkeley opted to replace Columbus Day with a celebration of Native American cultures and peoples.
Since then, an increasing number of cities and states have opted to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day alongside or in lieu of Columbus Day. And last Friday, President Biden signed a proclamation recognizing the holiday nationally for the first time ever. The document also affirmed a commitment by the President to honor tribal sovereignty and past treaties on the part of the government. Learn more about what some Native Americans have to say about the significance of the move via NPR.
Image: Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration in Berkeley, 2012. Credit: Quinn Dombrowski on Wikimedia Commons.
Photos: Celebrating Our 4th Annual Canadian Family Thanksgiving
Last Saturday, Canadian Studies welcomed friends from across the Bay back to Berkeley for a special Thanksgiving celebration, our first since 2019! Our 4th Annual Canadian Family Thanksgiving, hosted jointly with the Digital Moose Lounge, was a roaring success. Canadians and friends of Canada alike had fun connecting in-person over a turkey dinner; guests enjoyed music, trivia, and a raffle with Canadian prizes, including woolen tuques, a Team Canada Olympic jacket, and two Air Canada tickets! But most appreciated was a renewed community connection as guests mingled, chatted, and shared Canadian Stories. We can’t wait to see you again next year!
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Poppy Campaign: 4th Annual Canadian Thanksgiving

Earlier today the branch unofficially began its annual 2021 Poppy Campaign, as it participated in the 4th Annual Canadian Thanksgiving that was co-hosted Digital Moose Lounge and the Canadian Studies Program at the University of California at Berkeley.  Below are some pictures from the event that we located online.

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Last DAY for Thanksgiving Dinner tickets!

Note this event deadline.  Also, a reminder that this event is the unofficial beginning to our annual Poppy Campaign.


It’s turkey time in the Bay Area
View this email in your browser

Get your tickets for Thanksgiving (last day to purchase!)

We’re celebrating Thanksgiving together again! 

Join the DML and UC Berkeley’s Canadian Studies Program 

WHEN: SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2021 5 PM

We are so excited to be hosting Thanksgiving dinner again this year. Come enjoy a catered turkey dinner, sip some BC wines and show off your Canadian trivia knowledge.

Tickets include dinner and dessert, two drinks, and a chance to win a trip for two anywhere in North America courtesy of Air Canada.

This year’s event wouldn’t be possible without the generous support of BC Trade, Kascadia Wine Merchants, the Canadian Consulate of San Francisco, Air Canada, and our gracious hosts, UC Berkeley Canadian Studies.

*Please note, this is an adult-only event and all guests are required to show proof of vaccination*

More information>>

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Last chance for Thanksgiving! Plus: Making middle-class multiculturalism

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Canadian Thanksgiving is this Saturday – last chance for tickets!
  • Book talk next week: Making Middle Class Multiculturalism
  • In the news: Canada marks first-ever “National Day of Truth and Reconciliation”
  • External event: The 2021 Election’s Implications for Canadian Foreign Policy
  • Call for papers: ACSUS 2022 26th Biennial Conference
  • Call for papers: The Clean Water Act and Lake Champlain Basin
4th Annual Canadian Family Thanksgiving
October 9 | 5:00 pm | Alumni House, UC Berkeley | Purchase tickets here
Don’t miss your chance – join us this Saturday for our annual Canadian Thanksgiving dinner! Join us and our partners at the Digital Moose Lounge for a special meal celebrating the Bay Area’s Canadian community as we meet together for the first time since the pandemic. Mingle with your fellow SF Bay Canadians while enjoying entertainment and a delicious boxed turkey dinner. There will also be special prizes, including a raffle of Air Canada tickets! The dinner will take place outdoors and will observe all relevant public health measures.
Tickets are selling out fast, so buy yours today through the Digital Moose Lounge.
We’re also looking for volunteers to help staff the event. A limited number of half-priced tickets are available to volunteers; please contact us for more information.
UPCOMING EVENT
Book Talk: Making Middle-Class Multiculturalism: Immigration Bureaucrats and Policymaking in Postwar Canada
October 12 | 12:30 pm PT | Online | RSVP here
In the 1950s and 1960s, immigration bureaucrats played an important yet unacknowledged role in transforming Canada’s immigration policy. Their perceptions and judgements about the admissibility of individuals influenced the creation of formal admissions criteria for skilled workers and family immigrants that continue to shape immigration to Canada. Bureaucrats emphasized not just economic utility, but also middle-class traits and values such as wealth accumulation, educational attainment, entrepreneurial spirit, resourcefulness and a strong work ethic. By making “middle-class multiculturalism” a basis of nation-building in Canada, they created a much-admired approach to managing racial diversity that has nevertheless generated significant social inequalities. Migration expert Jennifer Elrick will discuss insights from her forthcoming book examining the topic.
Jennifer Elrick is an assistant professor of sociology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. Her research interests lie in the area of state classifications (in censuses and immigration policy) and their relationship to social stratification along the lines of race, gender, and social class. Her work is multi-national in scope, focusing on Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom.
IN THE NEWS
Canada Marks First “National Day for Truth and Reconciliation”
September 30 was Canada’s first-ever National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Originating from the Indigenous-led grassroots campaign known as “Orange Shirt Day”, the new commemoration honors survivors of Canada’s residential school system as well as the children who perished in the schools.
Canada’s residential schools operated for over a century, and were intended to forcibly assimilate Indigenous people into European-Canadian society. Attendance was compulsory for Indigenous children from 1894 to 1947. Children were intentionally separated from their communities, with the goal of eliminating Indigenous cultural practices; meanwhile, within the schools, they endured neglect, deprivation, and abuse.
In 2013, Indigenous writer and residential school survivor Phyllis Webstad established “Orange Shirt Day” on September 30, to promote awareness of the system’s impact on Indigenous communities. Webstad had arrived at the school wearing a new orange shirt, which was taken from her on arrival: it now symbolizes “stripping away of culture, freedom and self-esteem experienced by Indigenous children over generations.”
After several high-profile gravesite discoveries at former residential schools brought renewed attention to the issue earlier this year, the Canadian Government officially recognized the commemoration as a national statutory holiday called “National Day for Truth and Reconciliation”. Public commemoration and acknowledgement of the devastating impact of the system on Indigenous families and communities is vital to the reconciliation process.
EXTERNAL EVENT
Conversations on Canada: Solo Canada? The 2021 Election’s Implications for Canadian Foreign Policy
October 6 | 11 am PT | Online | RSVP here
The 2021 Canadian election included debates over just a few international relationships and issues, mainly China, climate change, and the evacuation of Kabul. On these issues and more, the relationship with the United States is important: border restrictions, COVID, Buy American provisions, USMCA implementation, Enbridge Line 5, and the extradition of Meng Wanzhou. On a growing range of issues Canada is looking for a partnership with the United States, but Canadians increasingly wonder if they are talking to themselves and if Americans are listening.
Dr. Christopher Sands, director of the Wilson Center’s Canada Institute and a Canadian Studies Program board member, will address these challenges in a conversation moderated by Dr. Christopher Kirkey, director of the Center for the Study of Canada and Institute on Québec Studies, SUNY Plattsburgh.
Call for Papers: ACSUS 2022 26th Biennial Conference
Deadline: November 1, 2021
In celebration of the its 50th anniversary, the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States (ACSUS) will host its 26th biennial conference, March 24-27, 2022, in Washington, D.C. The conference is open to all proposals with a significant Canadian focus. ACSUS welcomes papers and panel proposals from graduate students, professors, independent scholars,
and practitioners on all diverse and critical perspectives related to the theme, ‘Canada: Near and Far’. How is Canada perceived and portrayed from outside its borders, and by the international community? How is Canada understood by its expatriates? What role do non-governmental agencies around the world play in shaping Canada’s relationships with the world? What is ACSUS’s role in these larger questions? Proposals that touch on these themes through diverse and critical perspectives are especially encouraged, though, as always, submissions on all subjects addressing Canada and Canadian-American relations are welcome.
For more information on proposal guidelines and for submission information, please visit the conference’s website.
Call for Papers: The Clean Water Act and Lake Champlain Basin: Origins, Implementation, Impacts
Deadline: December 31, 2021
The Institute on Quebec Studies and the Lake Champlain Research Institute at SUNY Plattsburgh, in partnership with Groupe d’études et de recherche sur l’international et le Québec (GERIQ), École nationale d’administration publique (ÉNAP), and Observatoire sur les États-Unis, Chaire Raoul-Dandurand, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQÀM), are co-organizing a two-day authors’ workshop to investigate and review the 1972 U.S. Clean Water Act (CWA), and the implementation and impact of the Act on the Lake Champlain Basin. The goal is to produce a book volume with a leading university press.
This scholarly research colloquium and publication initiative – to be held in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the CWA – will bring together social scientists, applied scientists, and leading practitioners from the United States and Canada. They invite single-discipline, multidisciplinary, comparative, and applied case study proposals that offer original perspectives.
For more information, please read the call for papers here.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720