Category Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

CAN Colloquium 11:30 AM Dec 4

A reminder of this event tomorrow from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay area.


Canadian Studies Reminder
Last Colloquium of the Semester Dec 4
11:30 AM December 4
Join Canadian Studies for the final Colloquium of the Fall 2018 Semester. Three outstanding young scholars will present their work, followed by Q&A.
PhD Candidate, Civil/Environmental Engineering
“Water-driven methane transport in Burns Bog, British Columbia, Canada.”
PhD Candidate, Architecture
“The Reparative Logics of World War II Confinement Camp Preservation: British Columbia, Alaska and Hawaiʻi in Context”
Postdoctoral Scholar, Berkeley Law
“A Spirit of Liberty That is Dangerous to the Republic: The World Louisiana Slaves Encountered in France (1818-1848)”
Please Note: A Typo on the UC Berkeley Events Calendar incorrectly listed the event start time as 3:00 PM. That typo has been corrected. The Hildebrand Scholars Roundtable will occur at 11:30 AM on December 04 as scheduled.
Canadian Studies Colloquium
11:30 AM, Tuesday December 4
223 Moses Hall
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN Announcements

A newsletter from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Last Colloquium of the Semester Dec 4
Join Canadian Studies for the final Colloquium of the Fall 2018 Semester. Three outstanding young scholars will present their work, followed by Q&A.
PhD Candidate, Civil/Environmental Engineering
“Water-driven methane transport in Burns Bog, British Columbia, Canada.”
PhD Candidate, Architecture
“The Reparative Logics of World War II Confinement Camp Preservation: British Columbia, Alaska and Hawaiʻi in Context”
Postdoctoral Scholar, Berkeley Law
“A Spirit of Liberty That is Dangerous to the Republic: The World Louisiana Slaves Encountered in France (1818-1848)”
Canadian Studies Colloquium
11:30 AM, Tuesday December 4
223 Moses Hall
The below comes to us from our friends at the C-100
C100 is hosting an open event for Canadian Interns in the Bay Area
C100 is a global community of influential Canadians in technology who are committed to supporting, inspiring, and connecting the most promising Canadian entrepreneurial leaders. Driven by our community commitment, we aim to empower the next generation of successful companies by providing mentorship, community, connections and thought leadership.
On December 4th, C100 will host a Canadian Intern Event for Canadian interns in the Bay Area. This free event is for co-op/intern students across several universities from Canada who are finishing up their fall internships. The event will attract Canadian interns with the goal of providing opportunities for students to network and learn from both peers and professional Canadian speakers in the tech industry.
The C100 is looking forward to hosting an amazing group of interns with the goal of providing opportunities for students to network and learn from both peers and professional Canadian speakers in the tech industry!
Here’s what to expect:
  • Engaging keynotes from top Canadian tech leaders (Be inspired)
  • Interactive panels (Raise your hand)
  • Funny Icebreaker (Meet other interns)
  • Meal and drinks (Did someone say free food)
  • Grand raffle prizes (Test your luck – seriously you don’t want to miss these – prizes valued up to $200 each!)
DATE: Tuesday, December 4th, 2018
TIME: 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
WHERE: San Francisco Bay Area (Specific location details will be shared with participants 1 week before the event).
This event is open to all Canadian interns in the Bay Area. RSVP to save your spot here. For any questions or inquiries, please contact csong@thec100.org for more information.
Don’t miss this incredible intern only event and end your internship the right way!
The Below comes to us from our friends at the University of Winnipeg
Postdoctoral Fellow in History with a focus on German-Canadian migration or Canadian-German relations
The Chair in German-Canadian Studies at the University of Winnipeg invites qualified candidates to apply for the one-year Postdoctoral Fellow position in History with a focus on German-Canadian migration or Canadian-German relations. Application Deadline: 30 March 2019. Position Start: 1 July 2019 or 1 August 2019.
Applicants may have completed doctoral research on any aspect of Canadian history, German history, or any other national history, or transnational history with any focus such as gender, class, race, environment, economics, law, empire, etc. Applicants are expected to develop a self-generated program of research that explores a German-Canadian aspect of their doctoral work. Alternatively, applicants way wish to begin a new research project that focuses on the German-Canadian perspective of a broader issue (refugee history, business history, international relations, etc.). Previous research in German-Canadian Studies is not a requirement. The Postdoctoral Fellow position in History with a focus on German-Canadian migration or Canadian-German relations is made possible by a generous donation from the Spletzer Family Foundation.
The Postdoctoral Fellow position is open to scholars at an early stage of their academic careers (within ten years of completing their Ph.D.). The position is open to international applicants.
REQUIREMENTS
  • Applicants must have completed a Ph.D. in history or other field relevant to history.
  • Postdoctoral Fellow will conduct original research on a topic in German-Canadian history (migration, ethnicity, white settler colonialism, whiteness studies, international relations, transnational networks, transcultural encounters, gender, working-class, economic history, etc.).
  • International applicants will have to apply for a work permit from Citizenship and Immigration Canada upon approval of position.
  • Postdoctoral Fellow must reside in Winnipeg for the duration of the position.
  • Postdoctoral Fellow must present their findings to the wider research community at the end of the position tenure.
SUPPORT
  • $50,000.00 over 12 months.
  • $1,469.00 research costs
  • Office space (shared)
  • UW Library privileges
Applicants should send a cover letter, proposal with timeline, and curriculum vitae to the Chair in German-Canadian Studies at the University of Winnipeg: a.freund@uwinnipeg.ca.
Deadline: 30 March 2019
Announcement of results: 15 April 2019
Located in the heart of Treaty 1 Territory and the traditional homelands of the Métis Nation, The University of Winnipeg is a diverse, multicultural urban campus committed to academic excellence, community engagement, and social and environmental sustainability.
The University of Winnipeg is committed to employment equity, welcomes diversity in the workplace, and encourages applications from all qualified individuals including women, members of racialized communities, indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity.
Thank you so much!
Best,
Karen
Karen Brglez, M.A.
Program Assistant
German-Canadian Studies
University of Winnipeg
Phone: 204-786-9009
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley213 Moses Hall #2308Berkeley, CA 94720

 

CAN Announcements

From one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Next Colloquium Nov 13
Michael Adams, Environics
From award-winning author Michael Adams, Could It Happen Here? draws on groundbreaking new social research to show whether Canadian society is at risk of the populist forces afflicting other parts of the world.
Americans elected Donald Trump. Britons opted to leave the European Union. Far-right, populist politicians channeling anger at out-of-touch “elites” are gaining ground across Europe. In vote after shocking vote, citizens of Western democracies have pushed their anger to the top of their governments’ political agendas. The votes have varied in their particulars, but their unifying feature has been rejection of moderation, incrementalism, and the status quo.
Amid this roiling international scene, Canada appears placid, at least on the surface. As other societies retrench, the international media have taken notice of Canada’s welcome of Syrian refugees, its half-female federal cabinet, and its acceptance of climate science and mixed efforts to limit its emissions. After a year in power, the centrist federal government continues to enjoy majority approval, suggesting an electorate not as bitterly split as the ones to the south or in Europe.
As sceptics point out, however, Brexit and a Trump presidency were unthinkable until they happened. Could it be that Canada is not immune to the same forces of populism, social fracture, and backlash that have afflicted other parts of the world? Our largest and most cosmopolitan city elected Rob Ford. Conservative Party leadership hopeful Kellie Leitch proposes a Canadian values test for immigrants and has called the Trump victory “exciting.” Anti-tax demonstrators in Alberta chanted “lock her up” in reference to Premier Rachel Notley, an elected leader accused of no wrongdoing, only policy positions the protesters disliked.
Pollster and social values researcher Michael Adams takes Canadians into the examining room to see whether we are at risk of coming down with the malaise affecting other Western democracies. Drawing on major social values surveys of Canadians and Americans in 2016—as well as decades of tracking data in both countries—Adams examines our economy, institutions, and demographics to answer the question: could it happen here?
Canadian Studies Colloquium
11:30 AM, Tuesday November 13
223 Moses Hall
Canadian Studies is pleased to be a co-sponsor of the below event
RACE AND THE APPARATUS OF DISPOSABILITY
Thursday, Nov 15, 2018 | 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Multicultural Community Center, MLK Student Union Building, UC Berkeley
Location is ADA accessible
Sherene H. Razack, Distinguished Professor and the Penny Kanner Endowed Chair in Gender Studies, UCLA
Disposability, a condition written on the body, is a racial project. Populations that stand in the way of the progress of capital accumulation, are targeted for disposability, and relegated to the realm of “sub-humanity.” Processes of disposability enable white Europeanness to prevail. In this paper, I pursue what race has to do with disposability through an examination of the death in custody of a Roma refugee. I show that states have to arrange for the reduction of bodies to human waste and individuals who are a part of the medical and apparatus of disposability (prison guards, medical doctors, psychologists, coroners, lawyers, judges, legislators, and scholars), perform their part in disposability through a professionally and institutionally sustained belief in the lesser value of racialized populations. We can trace the racial along several routes: who is produced as disposable, the infrastructure of disposability, and notably the medical and legal apparatus required to transform the destruction of bodies into authorized killing. In this presentation, I spend most of my time tracing the destruction of the body of a Roma refugee who died in a detention center. I end with comments about the connections that can be drawn between the processes of disposability for refugees, African Americans, Canadians, and Indigenous peoples who die at the hands of the police. These connections reveal disposability to be a racial and global process orchestrated by states and sustained by professionals (medical, legal, police).
Sherene H. Razack is Distinguished Professor and the Penny Kanner Endowed Chair in Gender Studies, UCLA. Her books include: Dying from Improvement: Inquests and Inquiries into Indigenous Deaths in Custody (2015); At the Limits of Justice: Women of Colour On Terror (2014, ed. with Suvendrini Perera); States of Race (2011, co-editor with Malinda Smith and Sunera Thobani); Casting Out: Race and the Eviction of Muslims From Western Law and Politics (2008); Dark Threats and White Knights: The Somalia Affair, Peacekeeping and the New Imperialism (2004); Looking White People in the Eye (1998).
Co-sponsored by:
Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative
Canadian Studies
HIFIS Diversity and Democracy Cluster
HIFIS Diversity and Health Disparities Cluster
Native American Studies
Townsend Center for the Humanities
Multicultural Community Center
WSSA Call for Papers
The Western Social Sciences Association (WSSA) has released the call for papers for their 2019 conference. Limited travel funds may be available from Canadian Studies for Berkeley faculty & students presenting on Canadian topics at WSSA.
Canadian Studies is pleased to share the information about the below event, of interest to the Canadian community in the Bay Area
Grace Cathedral, San Francisco
Remembrance Service
November 11, 2018
3:00 pm
This cherished annual ceremony, in this year of the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, commemorates those who have lost their lives in armed conflict.
The service includes the deeply moving cascade of thousands of poppy petals onto the altar as Amazing Grace is played on the bagpipes.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

CAN Announcements

From one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Next Colloquium Nov 06
Prof. Julie Burelle, UCSD
Julie Burelle holds a PhD from the joint program in Drama and Theatre at UC San Diego and UC Irvine. Originally from Quebec, Canada, Julie has studied and taught theatre on both coasts of Canada and of the United States. She earned a B.A. in Theatre from the University of Toronto. Julie’s research is invested in a decolonizing project and is in conversation with the fields of Performance Studies, Cultural Studies, and Native American studies among others. Her most recent work focuses on how questions of First Nations sovereignty, cultural identity, and nationhood are negotiated through performances in the particular context of Quebec, a province whose national aspirations have often occupied center stage. Her case studies include theatrical and cinematic performances, and political and land-based protests. Julie has presented her work in multiple international settings and she has published in TheatreForum, TDR:The Drama Review, Dance Research Journal, as well as in various edited volumes.
As a practitioner, Julie works in collaborative settings and has served as a dramaturg for plays (most recently for Native Voices at the Autry, and for The Trip’s Orpheus and Eurydice), for dance projects (Les Noces Allyson Green / La Jolla Symphony and Chorus, Dee(a)r Spine by Sam Mitchell) and for documentary films (Québékoise by Mélanie Carrier and Olivier Higgins).
Dr. Burelle is the recipient of the 2017 Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Distinguished Teaching Award at UCSD — honoring her superb DEI teaching, cultural advocacy and public service efforts — and the 2018 Hellman Fellowship to pursue her research on Indigenous theatre and dance in Québec, Canada.
Canadian Studies Colloquium
Co-Sponsored by Indigenous Americas Working Group
11:30 AM, Tuesday November 06
223 Moses Hall
Bloemraad Featured Scholar of 2018
Irene Bloemraad was honored by the Center for Migration Studies and SAGE Publishing as the International Migration Review’s “Featured Scholar of 2018.” She delivered a keynote address at the annual Center for Migration Studies symposium in New York on “Understanding Membership in a World of Global Migration: (How) Does Citizenship Matter?”
Antíkoni:
Staged Readings By Beth Piatote
See Canadian Studies Affiliated Professor Beth Piatote in this limited run production!
LOCATION
Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology | 102 Kroeber Hall, UC Berkeley Campus
DATE
November 06, 2018
TIME
5:30 PM
Antíkoni
Staged Readings
By Beth Piatote
Directed by Jenni(f)er Tamayo
Free Event | Register Here
In this modern, haunting adaptation of Sophocles’ classic tragedy, Antigone, a Native American family is torn apart as they struggle over the fate of ancestral remains and their conflicting loyalties to different notions of tradition, law, and the price of sacrifice.
Limited run
Preview: Tuesday, November 6th at 5:30PM
Performances: Wednesday, November 7th at 1:00PM and 7:00PM
located at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, 102 Kroeber Hall
Doors will open for chair and floor seating 30 minutes prior to each show.
ADA accessible.
Sponsored by
Upcoming Colloquium Nov 13
Michael Adams, Environics
From award-winning author Michael Adams, Could It Happen Here? draws on groundbreaking new social research to show whether Canadian society is at risk of the populist forces afflicting other parts of the world.
Americans elected Donald Trump. Britons opted to leave the European Union. Far-right, populist politicians channeling anger at out-of-touch “elites” are gaining ground across Europe. In vote after shocking vote, citizens of Western democracies have pushed their anger to the top of their governments’ political agendas. The votes have varied in their particulars, but their unifying feature has been rejection of moderation, incrementalism, and the status quo.
Amid this roiling international scene, Canada appears placid, at least on the surface. As other societies retrench, the international media have taken notice of Canada’s welcome of Syrian refugees, its half-female federal cabinet, and its acceptance of climate science and mixed efforts to limit its emissions. After a year in power, the centrist federal government continues to enjoy majority approval, suggesting an electorate not as bitterly split as the ones to the south or in Europe.
As sceptics point out, however, Brexit and a Trump presidency were unthinkable until they happened. Could it be that Canada is not immune to the same forces of populism, social fracture, and backlash that have afflicted other parts of the world? Our largest and most cosmopolitan city elected Rob Ford. Conservative Party leadership hopeful Kellie Leitch proposes a Canadian values test for immigrants and has called the Trump victory “exciting.” Anti-tax demonstrators in Alberta chanted “lock her up” in reference to Premier Rachel Notley, an elected leader accused of no wrongdoing, only policy positions the protesters disliked.
Pollster and social values researcher Michael Adams takes Canadians into the examining room to see whether we are at risk of coming down with the malaise affecting other Western democracies. Drawing on major social values surveys of Canadians and Americans in 2016—as well as decades of tracking data in both countries—Adams examines our economy, institutions, and demographics to answer the question: could it happen here?
Canadian Studies Colloquium
11:30 AM, Tuesday November 13
223 Moses Hall
Announcements from Partner Canadian Studies Programs
The below comes to us from our friends at the University of Washington Canadian Studies Center:
SPECIAL CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
Dear Friends,
We’re recruiting for the University of Washington Fulbright Visiting Chair in Arctic Studies (2018-2019). Please consider applying or forward to your Canadian colleagues!
The Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Arctic Studies will be open to Canadian scholars that meet the eligibility requirements of the Fulbright Program. Specifically, the Chair will be focused on issues pertaining to Arctic Studies. Scholars and practitioners are invited to apply. Research interests may include the natural sciences, social sciences, arts or humanities. The Chair will carry out the program of research, teaching and service outlined in the successful application.
The teaching requirement includes a one-quarter, 3-credit, upper division seminar (ARCTIC 401) focused on the applicant’s research interests and appropriate to the students enrolled in the University of Washington’s minor in Arctic Studies. In addition, the Chair will provide the annual Fulbright Lecture focused on emerging issues and developments in the Arctic region and serve on the advisory board of the polar science and policy institute to build collaborative relations with Arctic scholars, scientists, and Indigenous organizations.
The Fulbright Visiting Research Chair is sponsored by the UW Office of Global Affairs; Division of Social Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences; Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; and, College of the Environment. It is administered and housed in the Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.
Sincerely,
Nadine Fabbi, Ed.D.
Managing Director
Canadian Studies Center | Arctic & International Relations
Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
University of Washington
More information:
·    Follow this link for general info on the Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Arctic Studies.
·    How to apply? Follow this link for more information.
·    Learn more about previous Fulbright Chairs in Arctic Studies at the UW using this link.
The below comes to us from our friends at the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada:
The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada is accepting applications for the 2019/2020 Eakin Fellowship. We would greatly appreciate it if you could forward the following to your e-mail listservs. We’ve also attached our PDF advertisement in both English and French. Thank you!
The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada (MISC) is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications for the Eakin Visiting Fellowship in Canadian Studies for the 2019/2020 academic year.
The Fellowship is awarded for periods of one or two academic semesters to an active scholar focusing on studies related to Canada. It is awarded for periods of one or two academic semesters to a scholar with a Ph.D., normally on sabbatical from their own academic institution. The position is open, in terms of rank and discipline, to dynamic scholars who can enrich the study of Canada with fresh perspectives. The Fellowship may also be awarded to an individual outside of the academic community, whose writing, research or public career are making a significant contribution to intellectual life in Canada.
The incumbent is expected to teach one undergraduate course in Canadian Studies at McGill University, deliver the Eakin Lecture (one Fellow per year), participate in the activities of the Institute, and pursue exchanges with colleagues at McGill and other institutions.
The Fellowship will offer a stipend of $15,000 per semester.
Applicants are invited to send:
·         Letter of Application
·         Curriculum Vitae
·         Letter of Reference
·         Course Proposal for an Advanced Seminar in Canadian Studies (one page maximum)
·         Indication of term preference: Fall 2019, Winter 2020, or a full year
Please send application materials by January 2, 2019 to:
Eakin Visiting Fellowship in Canadian Studies
McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
3463 Peel Street
Montréal (QC), H3A 1W7
or by email
Phone: (514) 398-8920
Fax: (514) 398-7336
The Eakin Visiting Fellowship in Canadian Studies was created with the generous support of the Eakin Family in memory of William R. Eakin.
Thank you very much!
Sincerely Yours,
The MISC Team
__________________________________________
McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
3463 Peel Street
Montreal, QC H3A 1W7
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

Pick Up Your Poppy At The Canadian Studies Program At UC Berkeley

From the Canadian Studies Program, UC Berkeley

Our poppies are now available at Canadian Studies, located within the Institute of International Studies at:

213 Moses Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720 USA
https://canada.berkeley.edu/contact

Building open to public M-F 9-5.

#SFBayCanadians #GetYourPoppy #PortezUnCoquelicot

   
   

CAN Announcements

An announcement from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
Next Colloquium October 12
Prof. Irene Bloemraad
Americans are deeply divided about migration policy and have limited appetite for increasing immigration. In contrast, Canada’s government has increased its immigration targets; the ruling party won in part due to a campaign promise to resettle thousands of Syrian refugees; and citizens largely support these policies. Why do Canadians seem to love immigration while Americans aren’t so sure?
Irene Bloemraad Professor, Sociology; Thomas Garden Barnes Chair of Canadian Studies; Faculty Director, Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative. Irene Bloemraad’s research examines how immigrants become incorporated into the political and civic life of their adopted countries and the consequences of immigration for politics and understandings of citizenship. Her publications include the book Becoming a Citizen: Incorporating Immigrants and Refugees in the United States and Canada. Her expertise led her to serve, in 2014–15, as a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences committee reporting on the integration of immigrants into U.S. society. She believes that excellence in research and teaching should go hand-in-hand and is the proud recipient of multiple Cal teaching and mentorship awards.
Sponsored by: Canadian Studies and BIMI as part of 2018 Homecoming Week.We recommend arriving early to ensure seats are available. Dr. Bloemraad’s talk is being publicized widely as part of the “Lectures and Learning Opportunities” section of Homecoming Week.
Canadian Studies Colloquium
Co-Sponsored by Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Institute
3:30 PM, Friday October 12
Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall
OCT 15: Two lectures on Indigenous issues and Canada
The below comes to us from our friends in Native American Studies.
Please see the attached flyers announcing two upcoming talks on October 15 by indigenous scholars in Canada: Prof. Renae Watchman (Dine), Mt. Royal University, Calgary, noon, 223 Dwinelle; and Prof. Robert Innes (First Nation Cowesess), University of Saskachewan, 4 p.m., 554 Barrows.
Please clirculate widely! All are invited!
These events are co-sponsored by the Indigenous Americas Working Group, the Townsend Center for Humanities, Canadian Studies, the Center for Race and Gender, and Native American Studies
73rd Annual United Nations Day
We forward as a courtesy this announcement of this Canadian Consulate co-sponsored event:

The United Nations Association of San Francisco and Marin County in Partnership with the American Legion Post 315 are producing the UN 73 DAY HUMAN RIGHTS, CLOSE TO HOME: ACHIEVING GENDER PAY PARITY with the CANADIAN CONSULATE GENERAL and the San Francisco Status of Women Department as Program Sponsors.

The International Labour Organization (ILO) expert, Chris Syder, is from the U. K. The S F Gender Pay Parity Leader, Kate Kennedy, was from Ireland. We will include not only the Consulate General of Canada, but also the U. K. and Ireland, in the program.

The 73rd Annual United Nations Day Flyer can be found here. 

Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308 WEBSITE | EMAIL

Poppy Campaign @ Digital Moose Lounge’s/Canadian Studies Program at Second Annual Thanksgiving

Here are some images that the Digital Moose Lounge and the Canadian Studies Program at UC Berkeley shared with us from their Second Annual Canadian Thanksgiving dinner yesterday evening.  This was the first event that distributed poppies at during our 2018 Poppy Campaign.