Category Archives: Canadian Studies Program UC Berkeley

Tomorrow: Is Canada’s healthcare system a model for the US?

A reminder of some up-coming events from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Event tomorrow: Is Canada’s healthcare system a model for the US?
  • Hildebrand Fellow Jonathan Holmes explains insurance risk pools
  • Funding opportunities open for grad & undergrad research
  • Upcoming event: “Canada’s Role in a Psychedelic Renaissance”
  • External event: Book talk on Canada’s lost citizens
  • External event: Western Washington U celebrates 50 years of Canadian Studies
Event Tomorrow
Panel Discussion: The Canadian Healthcare System: A Model for the US?
April 6 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Most Canadians are proud of their national healthcare system, widely considered one of the best in the world. But when it comes to US healthcare reform, the Canadian example is much more divisive. A growing number of Americans view Canada as a model for a potential US single-payer system. However, for many others a “Canadian” system conjures images of long waits and rationing. Join Canadian Studies for a special panel exploring how Canada’s healthcare system really works, and why its perception in the US is so polarized.
Gregory Marchildon is a professor of comparative healthcare at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He specializes in Canada’s healthcare system and has written extensively on comparative policy.
Amanda Aronczyk is a journalist and co-host of the NPR show Planet Money. Her 2020 episode “Frame Canada” investigated the US insurance lobby’s long-running PR campaign to block major healthcare reform by discrediting Canada’s healthcare system.
Daniel Béland is the director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada and James McGill Professor in the Department of Political Science at McGill University. He studies social policy and health care reform, and their relationship to fiscal policy.
Hildebrand Fellow Jonathan Holmes: Why You Should Care About Health Insurance Risk Pools
Jonathan Holmes is a Ph.D. candidate in economics at UC Berkeley, and he will graduate this spring. Jonathan will be joining the faculty at the University of Ottawa in 2022 after a one-year post-doc at the National Bureau of Economic Research. The recipient of a 2016 Hildebrand Research Fellowship, his current work focuses on public economics and health economics
I study how risk is pooled in health insurance markets. To understand risk pools, consider Berkeley’s student health plan. While undergraduate and graduate plans have identical benefits, a graduate plan is 60% more expensive than an undergraduate plan. Why? Because the graduate student risk pool is higher cost relative to the undergraduate risk pool.
For private health plans in the U.S. and Canada (private plans in Canada are called “supplemental” plans, and cover many services not covered by the public health plan, like prescription drugs), each employer is considered its own risk pool, and there is also a separate market for individuals.
Pooling risk in this way leads to large differences in the price of coverage. In the U.S., it is common for self-employed workers to pay 50% more than firms for identical coverage, because the individual market has a costlier risk pool. In a similar way, firms that employ mostly women pay higher premiums relative to male-dominated firms. Pooling risk in this way is arbitrary, and it encourages firms to avoid hiring individuals with chronic health conditions, to keep premiums low.
Fortunately, there exist policy solutions to eliminate these distinctions. Policymakers wishing to maintain private markets can legislate a common risk pool, like is currently done for the insurance exchanges created by the Affordable Care Act. Proposals for universal public healthcare, like Medicare for All (in the U.S.) or Canada’s national pharmacare program, would also eliminate or reduce the importance of risk pools.
Research Funding Opportunities with Canadian Studies
Deadline: May 7, 2021
The Canadian Studies Program is currently accepting applications for funding opportunities for both graduate and undergraduate students at UC Berkeley. Applications for AY 2021-22 will close next month, on May 7, 2021. Learn more and apply by clicking the links below.
The Edward E. Hildebrand Graduate Research Fellowship provides travel and research support for Berkeley graduate students whose work focuses primarily, or comparatively, on Canada. Fellowships typically range in the $5,000 – $10,000 range.
The Rita Ross Undergraduate Prize in Canadian Studies provides a cash prize of $250 to the Berkeley undergraduate who has produced the best research project engaging with a Canadian topic for a class or independent study program.
Please circulate this information to your students, peers, and networks!
Upcoming Event
Psychedelics, Eh? Canada’s Role in a Psychedelic Renaissance
April 27 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
In the 1950’s, the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was on the cutting edge of research into hallucinogenic drugs. Under the province’s massive healthcare reforms, researchers received grants to pursue LSD treatments they thought could revolutionize psychiatry. What do these experiments say about Canada’s healthcare system and society at the time? And what can we learn from the program’s successes and failures at a time when psychedelics are attracting renewed scientific and public interest?
Erika Dyck is the Canada Research Chair in the History of Health & Social Justice at the University of Saskatchewan. She specializes in the history of psychiatry, and has written several books on the history of psychedelic research and eugenics in Canada.
Affiliate/External Events
Book Talk: The Lost Canadians with Don Chapman
April 9 | 4:00 p.m. | RSVP here
What does it mean to be Canadian? The history of Canadian citizenship is complicated, and many have had their citizenship revoked or denied to many as a result of archaic and obscure legislation. As many as half a million of these “Lost Canadians” reside in the U.S., probably unaware that they are now Canadian citizens.
Don Chapman, a University of Washington alumnus and former United Airlines pilot, discovered his own revoked citizenship status; thus began his fight to restore citizenship rights to himself and others. Chapman has been the inspiration and force behind seven Parliamentary bills to amend the Citizenship Act, with the result that Canadian status has been granted to somewhere between one and two million people, retroactively.
Join the University of Washington’s Canadian Studies Center for an engaging discussion with Chapman centered around his 2015 book, The Lost Canadians: A Struggle for Citizenship Rights, Equality, and Identity. He will talk about citizenship as a basic human right, what it means to be rendered stateless, present-day discrimination, and his own experiences as a private individual changing federal legislation in Canada.
Book Talk: Bridging the Longest Border with Dr. Donald Alper
April 29 | 7:00 p.m. | RSVP here
As part of its 50th anniversary celebration, Western Washington University’s Center for Canadian-American Studies is sponsoring a talk by Dr. Don Alper on his new book, “Bridging the Longest Border”. The book is a story of how a handful of visionaries built a program at Western Washington University to educate students and community leaders about Canada. While not a history lesson, this book traces the journey of creating a place for developing knowledge about this important country just a stone’s throw away.
Dr. Alper is an emeritus professor of political science at Western Washington University, and the former director of Western’s Center for Canadian–American Studies and the Border Policy Research Institute. Known nationally for his advancement of Canadian Studies in the United States, he has taught courses on Canadian politics and Canada-U.S. relations for more than 40 years. Don Alper will be joined in conversation with Cat Wallace, journalism instructor at Whatcom Community College and editor.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Organizing against anti-Asian racism: the “Berkeley School” of economics

A newsletter from a fellow Canadian organization in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Hildebrand Fellow Jae Yeon Kim on effective community organization
  • In the News: Affiliate economist David Card & the “Berkeley School” of economics
  • Upcoming event: Is Canada’s healthcare system a model for the US?
  • Upcoming event: “Canada’s Role in a Psychedelic Renaissance”
  • External event: Canadian Inuit film now showing in select Bay Area theaters
Hildebrand Fellow Jae Yeon Kim Discusses Effective Community Organizing in the Face of Racism
Across the United States and Canada, activists are organizing to counter an alarming rise in hate crimes towards Asians. While advocates have reported an increase in hate crimes against Asians since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the push sees renewed urgency following a recent string of high-profile incidents, including a spate of robberies and unprovoked attacks targeting Asian elders in the San Francisco Bay Area.
However, a shared experience of racism isn’t necessarily enough to organize a cohesive movement, as research by former Hildebrand Fellow Jae Yeon Kim shows. Kim, a political scientist who studies grassroots mobilization among marginalized populations, says today’s activists can learn a lesson from how Chinatown activists in Vancouver, Seattle, and San Francisco mobilized to protect their neighborhoods in the 1960’s and ’70s.
His Hildebrand-funded research, published last year in Studies in American Political Development, explored why the three movements succeeded. According to Kim, Chinese activists carefully curated their allies, forming strategic partnerships outside their immediate community while ensuring their message and cohesion was not diluted by an overbroad coalition. “Coalition-building,” says Kim, “is not an automatic response” among marginalized groups: it relies on trust, strategy, and commitment for greatest effect. Read a summary of his findings here.
UC Berkeley will be hosting a special panel on the history and present of anti-Asian violence on April 1st: learn more here.
In the News
Professor David Card and the “Berkeley School” of Economics
recent article in The American Prospect profiled the growing influence of UC Berkeley’s economics department on current US policy. The department owes much of its reputation to its current chair, the Canadian labor economist (and Canadian Studies affiliate) David Card. As a young scholar, Card developed a reputation for iconoclastic, data-driven research that challenged then-current theoretical orthodoxies. When he relocated to Berkeley in 1997, Card’s preference for empiricism over theory was at odds with the department’s old guard and many of the larger schools of economics.
Today, however, it forms a central tenet among the department’s most notable figures – many of whom Card personally hired – and has been adopted by other leading schools, including Harvard, Princeton, and MIT. And with many Berkeley economists focusing on issues at intersection of economics and social policy, such as wealth inequality, the Berkeley model promises to only become more relevant as we seek data-driven answers to today’s most pressing problems.
Upcoming Events
Panel Discussion: The Canadian Healthcare System: A Model for the US?
April 6 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Most Canadians are proud of their national healthcare system, widely considered one of the best in the world. But when it comes to US healthcare reform, the Canadian example is much more divisive. A growing number of Americans view Canada as a model for a potential US single-payer system. However, for many others a “Canadian” system conjures images of long waits and rationing. Join Canadian Studies for a special panel exploring how Canada’s healthcare system really works, and why its perception in the US is so polarized.
Gregory Marchildon is a professor of comparative healthcare at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He specializes in Canada’s healthcare system and has written extensively on comparative policy.
Amanda Aronczyk is a journalist and co-host of the NPR show Planet Money. Her 2020 episode “Frame Canada” investigated the US insurance lobby’s long-running PR campaign to block major healthcare reform by discrediting Canada’s healthcare system.
Daniel Béland is the director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada and James McGill Professor in the Department of Political Science at McGill University. He studies social policy and health care reform, and their relationship to fiscal policy.
Psychedelics, Eh? Canada’s Role in a Psychedelic Renaissance
April 27 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
In the 1950’s, the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was on the cutting edge of research into hallucinogenic drugs. Under the province’s massive healthcare reforms, researchers received grants to pursue LSD treatments they thought could revolutionize psychiatry. What do these experiments say about Canada’s healthcare system and society at the time? And what can we learn from the program’s successes and failures at a time when psychedelics are attracting renewed scientific and public interest?
Erika Dyck is the Canada Research Chair in the History of Health & Social Justice at the University of Saskatchewan. She specializes in the history of psychiatry, and has written several books on the history of psychedelic research and eugenics in Canada.
Affiliate/External Events
Canadian Film Kuessipan Now Showing at Bay Area Theaters
The award-winning 2019 independent Canadian film Kuessipan is current receiving a limited theatrical release in several locations around the San Francisco Bay Area. Adapted from the acclaimed novel of the same name by First Nations author Naomi Fontaine, the drama tells the story of two girls in a Quebec Innu community who find their friendship tested when one begins to dream of leaving the reservation. Directed by Quebecoise filmmaker Myriam Verreault and co-written by Fontaine, the film stars Innu actors Sharon Ishpatao Fontaine and Yamie Grégoire. Learn more and find participating theaters here.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Upcoming events: Healthcare panel, poetry reading, & more Canadian films

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.

Note that due to the pandemic, these fellow Canadian organization have move their programming online – which would allow our members not in the Bay Area to take advantage of some of these opportunities.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Former program manager Elliott Smith takes to life on the high seas
  • In the News: Minimum wage increase won’t cost jobs, says affiliate David Card
  • Upcoming event: Is Canada’s healthcare system a model for the US?
  • External event: Poetry reading by affiliate Cecil Giscombe
  • External event: Canadian films at the Sonoma International Film Festival
Checking In: Former Canadian Studies Program Manager Elliott Smith Weighs Anchor on an Exciting New Career
Former Canadian Studies Program manager Elliott Smith has made some surprising professional moves in recent months – what one might even call a “sea-change”. Since leaving UC Berkeley last spring, Elliott has swapped the life of a land-lubber for a maritime existence in the US Merchant Marine. We caught up with him for a brief chat before he embarks on his new career. Please join us in wishing him good luck and smooth sailing!
“After 15 years working in higher education at Western Washington and Berkeley, I made a career switch. I used my downtime during the pandemic to acquire a United States Merchant Mariner Credential. I am going into the maritime industry. I recently passed tests for shipboard firefighting and ocean survival skills, and completed the final basic training steps necessary to work aboard ships sailing internationally.
“One of the things I most enjoyed about working for Canadian Studies at Cal was the ‘always be learning’ mentality cultivated by Professor Bloemraad. I plan to take that spirit into my new industry, and will keep the Canadian Studies community updated on my career growth and development. As a Seattle-based international mariner, I will almost certainly be assigned to the ‘inside passage’ route through British Columbia into Alaska often. I will make sure to share pictures with the Canadian Studies community of beautiful British Columbia whenever I can!”
In the News
Raising the Minimum Wage Won’t Cost Jobs, Says Canadian Studies Affiliate Economist David Card
A recent Berkeley News article asked several distinguished faculty economists about proposals to raise the US minimum wage to $15 – among them, Canadian Studies affiliate David Card. In 1993, Professor Card was one of the first to challenge the prevailing orthodoxy that increasing the minimum wage would lead to widespread job loss. Citing data from a study he did of New Jersey, Card found that not only was there no job loss when the state raised the minimum wage, in some cases employment even rose.
Card’s conclusions drew fierce criticism at the time, but are today increasingly accepted by a new generation of economists, including Joseph Stiglitz and Paul Krugman. However, Card says that the field has been slow to change, and that the current debate is rooted in dated theories: “{Economists} want to hold on to these models, even though they know full well that there are problems with them.”
Upcoming Event
Panel Discussion: The Canadian Healthcare System: A Model for the US?
April 6 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Most Canadians are proud of their national healthcare system, widely considered one of the best in the world. But when it comes to US healthcare reform, the Canadian example is much more divisive. A growing number of Americans view Canada as a model for a potential US single-payer system. However, for many others a “Canadian” system conjures images of long waits and rationing. Join Canadian Studies for a special panel exploring how Canada’s healthcare system really works, and why its perception in the US is so polarized.
Gregory Marchildon is a professor of comparative healthcare at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He specializes in Canada’s healthcare system and has written extensively on comparative policy.
Amanda Aronczyk is a journalist and co-host of the NPR show Planet Money. Her 2020 episode “Frame Canada” investigated the US insurance lobby’s long-running PR campaign to block major healthcare reform by discrediting Canada’s healthcare system.
Daniel Béland is the director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada and James McGill Professor in the Department of Political Science at McGill University. He studies social policy and health care reform, and their relationship to fiscal policy.
Affiliate/External Events
Poetry and Memoir Reading by Cecil S. Giscombe
March 23 | 7:00 p.m. | Watch here
Canadian Studies affiliate Cecil S. Giscombe – a poet, essayist, teacher, traveler, and professor of writing and literature at UC Berkeley – will headline Washington State University’s Visiting Writers Series with a live reading on March 23.
The event begins at 7 p.m. on YouTube live and is free and open to the public.
Sonoma International Film Festival
March 24-28 | Buy tickets here
The Sonoma International Film Festival will be showcasing a number of independent Canadian films during its run from March 24-28. Selections include Death of a Ladies’ Man; Nadia, Butterfly; Escape from Extinction; First We Eat; and The New Corporation. All films will be available to stream online. View the entire film guide and order tickets here.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Our Big Give results are in! Plus, Canadian films; St Patrick’s Day events 🍀

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Canadian Studies Announcements
In this issue:
  • Big Give: Early results show a blowout success!
  • Call for nominations: ACSUS Awards
  • In the news: How Quebeckers are celebrating St. Patrick’s Day in 2021
  • In the news: The Irish heritage of Prince Edward Island
  • “Canada Now” offers US residents access to Canadian film and television
  • Upcoming event: Is Canada’s healthcare system a model for the US?
  • External event: Virtual St. Patrick’s Day happy hour
  • External event: Canadian films at the Sonoma International Film Festival
Program Announcements
An “Unprecedented” Big Give – Thanks to You!
Canadian Studies is thrilled to announce that this year’s Big Give was our most successful of all time. Tabulation is ongoing, but early results show that we raised at least $65,800. That’s more than most departments at Berkeley – pretty impressive for a small program!
At a time when private philanthropy is more crucial than ever for programs like ours, you support sends a strong message to the university about the value of Canadian Studies. We’re incredibly grateful for your support. Look out for new efforts to support and share our research, knowledge, and events in the coming months!
Call for Nominations: ACSUS Awards
The ACSUS Awards Committee invites you to submit your nominations for the following awards. These awards aim to encourage new scholars in Canadian Studies in the United States. Details on the awards and the submission deadlines are provided below.
In the News
St. Patrick’s Day Revelers Get Creative in Quebec
For the second year in a row, the COVID-19 pandemic has cancelled St. Patrick’s Day festivities across Canada, including Montreal’s traditional parade. However, that’s not stopping a group of determined Quebeckers. Although only 5% of the provinces’ inhabitants identify as Irish, St. Patrick’s Day celebrations are a cherished tradition for many. CBC News reports on how groups across the province are adapting to the times with small – and safe – alternatives to the traditional public parties.
Image: 2017 St. Patrick’s Day parade in Montreal. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)
Prince Edward Islanders Celebrate Irish Roots
On Prince Edward Island, a family connection to Ireland is never far away: about 30% of residents trace their ancestry to the Emerald Isle. Many Irish people came to Canada to escape grinding poverty at home, particularly during the Great Famine of 1845-1852. Today, many Islanders are proud of their Irish roots. CBC News reported on the story of once such immigrant family, the McKennas, as told by a 21st-century descendant.
Image: Charlottetown Benevolent Irish Society, 1917. (Sara Fraser/CBC)
“Canada Now” Offers Monthly Curated Canadian Films
A new online portal offers US residents access to a collection of Canada’s best films and television programs, updated monthly. March’s arrivals include Antigone, which translates the Ancient Greek drama to a refugee family in Montreal; White Lies, about one woman’s online fraud, and the stylish gangster film Mafia Inc. The site also offers themed collections, such as “Mosaic: Women Create”, holiday themes, and Francophone productions. The project is funded by Telefilm Canada, the Consulate General of Canada in New York, and the National Film Board of Canada. Learn more and sign up here.
Upcoming Event
Panel Discussion: The Canadian Healthcare System:
A Model for the US?
April 6 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Most Canadians are proud of their national healthcare system, widely considered one of the best in the world. But when it comes to US healthcare reform, the Canadian example is much more divisive. A growing number of Americans view Canada as a model for a potential US single-payer system. However, for many others a “Canadian” system conjures images of long waits and rationing. Join Canadian Studies for a special panel exploring how Canada’s healthcare system really works, and why its perception in the US is so polarized.
Gregory Marchildon is a professor of comparative healthcare at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He specializes in Canada’s healthcare system and has written extensively on comparative policy.
Amanda Aronczyk is a journalist and co-host of the NPR show Planet Money. Her recent episode “Frame Canada” explored the US insurance lobby’s long-running PR campaign against Canada’s healthcare system to block major healthcare reform.
Daniel Béland is the director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada and James McGill Professor in the Department of Political Science at McGill University. He studies social policy and health care reform, and their relationship to fiscal policy.
Image: Woman protests for healthcare reform in Connecticut, 2009. Credit: Sage Ross on Wikimedia Commons.
Affiliate/External Events
St. Patrick’s Day Happy Hour
March 17 | 4:00 p.m. | RSVP here
Our friends at the Digital Moose Lounge invite you to a virtual St. Patrick’s Day happy hour. Celebrate with green beer, Guinness floats, fun games, and great company along with your fellow SF Bay Area Canadians!
As part of the celebration, Augie’s Montréal Deli in Berkeley is offering a St. Patrick’s Day special menu: 8oz smoked meat, parboiled red potato & parboiled cabbage for $17. Order in advance for curbside pickup.
Sonoma International Film Festival
March 24-28 | Buy tickets here
The Sonoma International Film Festival will be showcasing a number of independent Canadian films during its run from March 24-28. Selections include Death of a Ladies’ Man; Nadia, Butterfly; Escape from Extinction; First We Eat; and The New Corporation. All films will be available to stream online. View the entire film guide and order tickets here.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720

Today’s the day – show your support for Canadian Studies! 🇨🇦

An item from one of our fellow Canadian organizations in the Bay Area.


Dear Michael,
Today, Canadian Studies is taking part in Big Give, Berkeley’s annual day of giving. As a donor-supported program, we rely on your generosity to advance our mission of promoting knowledge of Canada and its people: 76% of our budget comes from private philanthropy. Below, you’ll see examples of some of the ways we put your donations to work, from providing free public events to supporting students and research on Canada. I hope you’ll join us by making a gift of a size that feels comfortable to help us continue this important work.
Irene Bloemraad
Program Director
Barnes Chair in Canadian Studies
Read this before you give: you could help us win a big prize!
Throughout the day, the university will be running special timed contests with thousands of dollars in prizes for winning units. Your gift of any size could enter us to win if your name is randomly selected during the contest period – just see which group you fall into below and make your gift during the contest window. It’s that easy!
  • Anyone: Sign up for a recurring gift ($1,500)
  • Berkeley alumni: Donate between 10 a.m. and noon PT ($1,500)
  • Non-alumni: Donate between 9-11 a.m. PT ($1,500)
Canadian Studies has a big impact on students!
Whether through our graduate Hildebrand Fellowships or undergraduate Ross Prize, Canadian Studies is committed to supporting Berkeley students conducting research on Canada. We’re proud to sponsor these young scholars as they engage in world-class research projects; past Hildebrand Fellows have gone on to academic appointments with schools including Yale, the University of Windsor, and Middlebury College. Read below to find out what participants have to say about the program!
“The funding that I received {from Canadian Studies} was really pivotal to my research. Admittedly, the work that I proposed was pretty ambitious (and expensive). So the Canadian Studies Program being willing to step up and put some resources on the table for me to actually get started was really key. I’m very grateful for that.”
– Dr. Daniel Suarez, 2012 Hildebrand Fellow and assistant professor of environmental studies at Middlebury College
“Knowing that Canadian Studies was here made me feel confident that I could keep my connection to Canadian scholarship… It was actually a major draw in deciding to come to Berkeley! I also appreciated the way that Canadian Studies works hard to integrate graduate students by giving us opportunities to share our research and practice presenting our work in a supportive environment.”
– Dr. Julia Lewandoski, 2016 Hildebrand Fellow and assistant professor of history at Cal State San Marcos
“Canadian Studies creates a community for those interested in just about anything related to it. After all – as someone who has lived in both Canada and the US – both countries are intricately tied together in just about every way. It was very affirming to know there is a community on campus interested in this work!”
– Evan Walsh, 2017 Ross Prize winner
After much delay, current Hildebrand Fellow Mindy Price leaves for Canada next month! An environmental sociologist and political ecologist, her research focuses on indigenous food sovereignty and the effects of climate change on agriculture in the far north. Mindy’s grant will cover her research expenses as she studies agriculture in the Northwester Territories, and how government programs interact with Indigenous sovereignty claims. (Don’t worry – we’ll also cover her COVID quarantine and other safety precautions.)
Canadian Studies supports research!
This year, Canadian Studies welcomed our first-ever full time research associate. Dr. Rebecca Wallace, a political scientist specializing in immigration and minority issues, recently joined the program a John A. Sproul Research Fellow. Dr. Wallace will assist program director Irene Bloemraad in analyzing data on attitudes toward immigrants in Canada and the United States. The project measures the effectiveness on public opinion of appeals made by immigrants and their advocates to different kinds of rights.
Here’s what our supporters have to say about the program:
“I’m very impressed with the way that Canadian Studies is run. I think it’s remarkable what you have been able to accomplish with the modest funding available. Canadian Studies does more with less than almost anyone I know, and that’s to Irene’s credit. I often tell other faculty directors that they should follow her example.”
“One of the things I enjoy the most about Canadian Studies at Berkeley is the colloquia, as it exposes me to cutting-edge research and innovative studies. I value the opportunity to connect with thought leaders in migration studies, indigenous affairs, politics, and sociology.”
“Canadian Studies provides an intellectual lifeline to Canadians at UC Berkeley and throughout the Bay Area. Whether visiting scholars passing through only for a few months, or transplants like myself who have settled here, I’ve yet to meet a Canadian affiliated with UC Berkeley who, once connected to the Canadian Studies Program, isn’t hooked!”
“Canadian Studies is a unique mix of important scholarship and community engagement. It is a cultural and intellectual home for students, academics, and the broader community. I love having a place where I can both learn what new research is taking place and witness the mixing of thoughtful, intelligent people from all over the world.”
Your donations help make free events like the following possible!
Panel Discussion: The Canadian Healthcare System:
A Model for the US?
April 6 | 12:30 p.m. | RSVP here
Most Canadians are proud of their national healthcare system, widely considered one of the best in the world. But when it comes to US healthcare reform, the Canadian example is much more divisive. For a growing number of Americans, Canada is a model for a potential US single-payer system. However, for many others a “Canadian” system conjures images of long waits and rationing. Join Canadian Studies for a special panel exploring how Canada’s healthcare system really works, and why its reputation in the US is so polarized.
Image: Woman protests for healthcare reform, 2009. Credit: Sage Ross on Wikimedia Commons.
Canadian Studies Program
213 Moses Hall #2308
Canadian Studies Program | Univ. of California, Berkeley, 213 Moses Hall #2308, Berkeley, CA 94720