Category Archives: Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies

Webinar: Carla-Jean Stokes on Canadian First World War Photography

These webinars, which are offered in partnership with Dominion Command, may be of interest to some members.


“We Must See Our Men”: Canada’s Official First World War Photographs
View this email in your browser
CARLA-JEAN STOKES

“We Must See Our Men”: Canada’s Official First World War Photographs 

November 3rd, 7:30 PM ET

The webinar is FREE on Zoom.

Registration is required, but you do not need a Zoom account to watch.

Register HERE

This talk will explore the history of Canada’s official First World War photography program from its inception in 1916 to its conclusion in 1919. We will meet each of Canada’s war photographers and examine their individual styles through viewing digitized vintage prints from the war. This investigation of original photographs will allow us to learn more about the materiality and complex lives of printed objects.

 

CARLA-JEAN STOKES is a writer, lecturer, and curator of war photographs. She has an MA in history from Wilfrid Laurier University, as well as an MA in Photographic Preservation and Collections Management. In 2015, she won the Photographic Historical Society of Canada thesis prize for work, “British Official First World War Photographs, 1916-1918: Arranging and Contextualizing a Collection of Prints at the Art Gallery of Ontario.” She also received the 2019 Elaine Ling Fellowship from the Ryerson Image Centre for her project: “‘Somewhere in France:’ Contextualizing the Ryerson Image Centre’s Collection of Canadian First World War Photographs.”

UPCOMING WEBINARS

17 November
Dr. Lloyd Axworthy and Olivia Fernandes
“The Ottawa Treaty Today”
In Partnership with the Canadian Land Mine Foundation
Click HERE to Register

1 December | Speaker Series
Alistair Edgar
“Give War a Chance: Are Peace-Building and Stabilization a Bust after Afghanistan?”
Click HERE to Register

Presented by:
Click here to listen to the latest episode of On War & SocietyOh What A Visual War with Beatriz Pichel.

On War & Society features authors discussing their research, the challenges associated with doing history, and life ‘behind the book.’

Copyright © 2021 LCMSDS, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
LCMSDS
75 University Ave W
Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada

Webinar: Joy Porter on Trauma and Indigenous Masquerade

These webinars, which are offered in partnership with Dominion Command, may be of interest to some members.


The remarkable story of Canadian soldier and poet, Frank Prewett
View this email in your browser

JOY PORTER

That Talented Canadian, Mr. Frank Prewett: Trauma and Indigenous Masquerade in the Wake of the First World War

October 6th, 3:30 PM ET

The webinar is FREE on Zoom.

Registration is required, but you do not need a Zoom account to watch.

CLICK HERE to Register

Buried alive by shell-fire in April 1918, Frank Prewett emerged from French soil convinced he could see and commune with the dead. He poured all of this and much else into some of the most moving but under-discussed poetry of the war.

His brooding good looks and claims of Iroquois ancestry attracted both sexes. While the two convalesced from shell-shock in the Scottish borders, the British poet and aristocrat Siegfried Sassoon fell deeply in love with him. Sassoon introduced Prewett to the cream of the British literary world and Prewett took up residence in the fabulous Oxfordshire home of the “daughter of a thousand earls”, Lady Ottoline Morrell. Virginia Woolf published Prewett’s poetry, he was painted by Dorothy Brett and befriended by Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, Edmund Blunden, Wilfred Owen and Robert Graves.

Amidst the heady vertigo of pandemic-ridden, post-war England, this remarkable Canadian became the toast of elite British literary society—that is, until it all crashed around his ears.

JOY PORTER is Leverhulme Major Research Fellow and PI of the Treatied Spaces Research Group at the University of Hull, U.K. (treatiedspaces.com) where she researches Indigenous, environmental, and diplomatic themes in an interdisciplinary context. Fascinated by the mind, by what makes us love, persevere, transcend and escape the legacies of conflict, her work exposes how culture impacts the world.

UPCOMING WEBINARS

3 November | Speaker Series
Carla-Jean Stokes
“‘We must see our men’: Canada’s Official First World War Photographs”
Click HERE to Register

1 December | Speaker Series
Alistair Edgar
“Give War a Chance: Are Peace-Building and Stabilization a Bust after Afghanistan?”
Click HERE to Register

Presented by:
Click here to listen to the latest episode of On War & SocietyThe American War in Vietnam with Robert Thompson.

On War & Society features authors discussing their research, the challenges associated with doing history, and life ‘behind the book.’

Copyright © 2021 LCMSDS, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
LCMSDS
75 University Ave W
Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada

Webinar: Joy Porter on Trauma and Indigenous Masquerade

Dominion Command of the Royal Canadian Legion has partnered with the folks at the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies, who have been providing webinars and these articles throughout the pandemic.  A great benefit for members and non-members alike.


The remarkable story of Canadian soldier and poet, Frank Prewett
View this email in your browser

JOY PORTER

That Talented Canadian, Mr. Frank Prewett: Trauma and Indigenous Masquerade in the Wake of the First World War

October 6th, 3:30 PM ET

The webinar is FREE on Zoom.

Registration is required, but you do not need a Zoom account to watch.

CLICK HERE to Register

Buried alive by shell-fire in April 1918, Frank Prewett emerged from French soil convinced he could see and commune with the dead. He poured all of this and much else into some of the most moving but under-discussed poetry of the war.

His brooding good looks and claims of Iroquois ancestry attracted both sexes. While the two convalesced from shell-shock in the Scottish borders, the British poet and aristocrat Siegfried Sassoon fell deeply in love with him. Sassoon introduced Prewett to the cream of the British literary world and Prewett took up residence in the fabulous Oxfordshire home of the “daughter of a thousand earls”, Lady Ottoline Morrell. Virginia Woolf published Prewett’s poetry, he was painted by Dorothy Brett and befriended by Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, Edmund Blunden, Wilfred Owen and Robert Graves.

Amidst the heady vertigo of pandemic-ridden, post-war England, this remarkable Canadian became the toast of elite British literary society—that is, until it all crashed around his ears.

JOY PORTER is Leverhulme Major Research Fellow and PI of the Treatied Spaces Research Group at the University of Hull, U.K. (treatiedspaces.com) where she researches Indigenous, environmental, and diplomatic themes in an interdisciplinary context. Fascinated by the mind, by what makes us love, persevere, transcend and escape the legacies of conflict, her work exposes how culture impacts the world.

UPCOMING WEBINARS

3 November | Speaker Series
Carla-Jean Stokes
“‘We must see our men’: Canada’s Official First World War Photographs”
Click HERE to Register

1 December | Speaker Series
Alistair Edgar
“Give War a Chance: Are Peace-Building and Stabilization a Bust after Afghanistan?”
Click HERE to Register

Presented by:
Click here to listen to the latest episode of On War & SocietyThe American War in Vietnam with Robert Thompson.

On War & Society features authors discussing their research, the challenges associated with doing history, and life ‘behind the book.’

Copyright © 2021 LCMSDS, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
LCMSDS
75 University Ave W
Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada

New articles are available from Canadian Military History!

Dominion Command of the Royal Canadian Legion has partnered with the folks at the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies, who have been providing webinars and these articles throughout the pandemic.  A great benefit for members and non-members alike.


First Canadian Army artillery support in Operation Veritable, German armoured assaults against the Normandy bridgehead, plus fourteen book reviews!
View this email in your browser
New articles from Canadian Military History Vol. 30 No. 1 are now available at http://scholars.wlu.ca/cmh/
“A Calculated and Terrible Efficiency:” The Operation Veritable Fire Plan, February 1945
David Grebstad
Abstract: The First Canadian Army’s Operation Veritable, launched in early February 1945, aimed to drive the Germans from between the Maas and Rhine Rivers in order to establish the jumping off point for the Allied assault into the Rhineland. To support this attack, over a thousand guns were assembled from Canadian and British artilleries to smash and suppress the German defenders as the Anglo-Canadian manoeuvre forces advanced. Through innovation, guile and the use of new and more effective equipment, the gunners in support of First Canadian Army overcame challenging terrain and a weakened but nonetheless resolute enemy to enable the largest offensive operation of Canadian arms in the Second World War with what one Canadian Army historian referred to as a “calculated and terrible efficiency.”
The Night of the Panthers: The Assault of Kampfgruppe Meyer/Wünsche on Bretteville-l’Orgueilleuse, 8/9 June 1944
Arthur Gullachsen
Abstract: This article provides historical insight into the failure of German armoured counterattacks in the immediate aftermath of the Normandy invasion. The failure of an armoured battlegroup of the 12.SS-Panzerdivision to take the village of Bretteville l’Orgueilleuse on the night of 8/9 June 1944 was not exclusively due to poor planning, lack of coordination and not enough infantry support. Though these factors
were present in abundance, the main reason for failure was German confidence in mutated armoured tactics that were successfully used by the Waffen-SS on the Eastern Front. These rough tactics, though successful in the Ukraine in 1943, actually violated established German armoured doctrine. The failure of the Waffen-SS commanders to recognise the need for greater preparation and, by default, larger and more powerful resources doomed their early offensive operations against the Normandy bridgehead, one of which is examined in detail within this article.
BOOK REVIEWS
Morrison: The Long-Lost Memoir of Canada’s Artillery Commander in the Great War by Major-General Sir Edward Morrison, edited by Susan Raby-Dunne 
Peter L. Belmonte

Harry Livingstone’s Forgotten Men: Canadians and the Chinese Labour Corps in the First World War by Dan Black
Tim Cook

Making the Best of It: Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland during the Second World War edited by Sarah Glassford and Amy Shaw
Tim Cook

Not for King or Country: Edward Cecil-Smith, The Communist Party of Canada, and the Spanish Civil War by Tyler Wentzell
Tim Cook

Crerar’s Lieutenants: Inventing the Canadian Junior Army Officer, 1939-45 by Geoffrey Hayes
Caroline d’Amours

A Township At War by Jonathan F. Vance
John Heckman

Forging the Shield: The U.S. Army in Europe, 1951-1962 (U.S. Army in the Cold War) by Donald A. Carter
Mark Klobas

Fort Henry: An Illustrated History by Steve Mecredy
Michael P.A. Murphy

Ypres by Mark Connelly and Stefan Goebel
Katrina J. Pasierbek

Indigenous Peoples and the Second World War: The Politics, Experiences and Legacies of War in the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand by R. Scott Sheffield and Noah Riseman

William John Pratt

Operation Kinetic: Stabilizing Kosovo by Sean M. Maloney
Krenare Recaj

The Imperial Army Project: Britain and the Land Forces of the Dominions and India, 1902-1945 by Douglas E. Delaney
Brad St.Croix

The Craft of Wargaming: A Detailed Planning Guide for Defense Planners and Analysts by Jeff Appleget, Robert Burks and Fred Cameron
David Stubbs

The Stories Were Not Told: Canada’s First World War Internment Camps by Sandra Semchuk
Andrew Theobald

Copyright © 2021 Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up for updates from the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University.

Our mailing address is:

Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies

75 University Ave W

Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5

Canada

Zoom Webinar: Geoff Hayes on The Canadians in Normandy

Note this up-coming event that members may be interested in attending.


View this email in your browser

GEOFF HAYES

The Canadians in Normandy:
Another Go-Around

August 25th, 7:30 PM ET

The webinar is FREE on Zoom.

Registration is required, but you do not need a Zoom account to watch.

CLICK HERE to Register

Despite years of debate, the view persists that “something appeared to be wrong” with First Canadian Army through the summer of 1944. This talk traces the Canadian path through Normandy to re-consider an ‘old’ narrative. It argues that, in the face of heavy casualties and enduring British criticism of the Canadians, the soldiers of First Canadian Army understood that they had earned a remarkable victory in Normandy. Finally, after over four years of war, the Canadians believed that they had won a Canadian victory, one that matched, even surpassed their fathers’ achievements a generation before.

Educated at Wilfrid Laurier University and Western University, GEOFF HAYES is a professor of history at the University of Waterloo. He was a student of Terry Copp when he wrote The Lincs: A History of the Lincoln and Welland Regiment at War (1986). Most recently his book, Crerar’s Lieutenants: Inventing the Canadian Junior Army Officer, 1939–1945 (UBC, 2017) won the 2018 C.P. Stacey Award. Geoff has learned a great deal from the many student tours he has joined on the battlefields of Northwest Europe, organized through the Canadian Battlefields Foundation.

UPCOMING WEBINARS

6 October | Telling the Stories of Canada
Joy Porter
“That Talented Canadian, Mr. Frank Prewett:
Trauma and Indigenous Masquerade in the Wake of the First World War”
Click HERE to Register

3 November | Telling the Stories of Canada
Carla-Jean Stokes
“First World War Photography”
Click HERE to Register

Presented by:
Click here to listen to the latest episode of On War & SocietyThe American War in Vietnam with Rob Thompson.

On War & Society features authors discussing their research, the challenges associated with doing history, and life ‘behind the book.’

Copyright © 2021 LCMSDS, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
LCMSDS
75 University Ave W
Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5

Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies · 75 University Ave W · Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 · Canada