The Mac-Paps serve in Spain

An item from the Legion Magazine.


Military Milestones
The Mac-Paps serve in Spain

The Mac-Paps serve in Spain

Story by Sharon Adams

In 1936, the elected republican government in Spain faced a military coup headed by General Francisco Franco, who was backed by the fascist governments in Italy and Germany. The republicans put out a plea for international help, and tens of thousand of idealistic young men and women from many countries flocked to Spain to fight fascism.

Western governments feared they would be radicalized and return home to foment revolution. In the spring of 1937, Canada joined other countries that made it illegal for their citizens to enlist in foreign wars.

Nonetheless, by mid-July, nearly 1,600 Canadian volunteers had gone to Spain to fight with the republications. At least 400 died there.

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Front Lines
A German commander’s assessment of the D-Day invasion

A German commander’s assessment
of the D-Day invasion

Story by Stephen J. Thorne

A field report submitted by Adolf Hitler’s commander-in-chief on the western front said the Allies’ invading D-Day forces gained a foothold in occupied Europe due to four key factors. In the report filed two weeks after the June 6, 1944, invasion, Field Marshal Karl R. Gerd von Rundstedt said the Allies’ “complete mastery in the air” was the No. 1 contributor to their early successes in Normandy.

Von Rundstedt also cited “the skilful and large-scale employment of enemy parachute and airborne troops [and] the flexible and well-directed support of the land troops by ships’ artillery” as major factors in the invasion, along with painstaking preparation and a swift post-invasion buildup.

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This week in history
This week in history

July 18-20, 1944

Second and Third Canadian divisions participate in an attack designed to break out of the Orne bridgehead south of Caen, France.

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