Tag Archives: World War One Centennial Commission

WWI DISPATCH July 2022

A monthly newsletter from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission, which may be of interest to members.


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July 2022

National WWI Memorial construction time lapse video

The National WWI Memorial Construction In A Minute video reveals that building the Memorial was monumental in its own right. It was accomplished during a raging global pandemic with its associated challenges of supply chain, labor, and safety. This video salutes all those whose dedication, sweat, and toil went into realizing this tribute to our Doughboys and all those who served in the name of Liberty and Freedom just over a century ago.

The Doughboy Foundation partners with “Google Arts & Culture”

Google Arts & Culture logo

Google Arts & Culture is a non-commercial initiative from Google that puts the treasures, stories and knowledge of over 2,000 cultural institutions from 80 countries at everyone’s fingertips and the Doughboy Foundation is honored to be among them. Earlier in the spring of 2022, the Doughboy Foundation officially became a “Google Arts & Culture” partner focusing on the platform’s unique storytelling capabilities. Now the Foundation has launched our first “story” on the platform in time for Juneteenth. We invite you to our newly launched Google Arts & Culture site and encourage you to dig into the self-guided interactive story with its historical archival footage, still images and contemporary performance by the 369th Experience. Click here to read the story of the band that brought jazz to Europe, and a new perspective to the Home Front after World War I.


Doughboy Foundation Legacy Society enables planned giving support

The Doughboy Foundation Legacy Society

The Doughboy Foundation is pleased to offer planned giving opportunities for individuals who wish to join our Legacy
Society and help preserve a vibrant, experiential Memorial for future generations. The Doughboy Foundation’s mission is to “keep faith with the American Doughboy” by ensuring all those who served in World War I are not forgotten. Click here to learn how your gift for the Doughboy Foundation can help fund the Memorial’s visitor programs in perpetuity, inspiring future generations of visitors and forever honoring not only our World War I veterans, but all U.S. servicemen and women.


369th Experience at Kennedy Center 2022

The 369th Experience plays at Kennedy Center in D.C. during Juneteenth Musical Salute Forward March for Freedom

The 369th Experience participated in a series of events and performances last month in Washington, DC, in recognition of Juneteenth, Black Music Month and the military and musical contributions of the 369th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Harlem Hellfighters. Forward March for Freedom brought band students from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other schools across the country to Washington, DC to participate in a series of events and performances, highlighted by a performance on the Millennium Stage at the Kennedy Center for the performing Arts. Click here to learn more about the 369th Experience and watch video of their Kennedy Center Performance. 


Efforts Renewed for Congressional Gold Medal to Honor World War I ‘Hello Girls’

Military Officers Association of America logo

The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) recently published an article urging its members to support the effort underway in the Senate to gain sponsors for the proposed Congressional Gold Medal to honor the “Hello Girls,” the pioneering World War I Army Signal Corps Female Telephone Operators Unit, which is receiving renewed bipartisan attention in the House and Senate. Click here to read the article, and find out how MOAA members (and non-members!) can support the effort to recognize the Hello Girls, who provided critical communications as switchboard operators on the WWI front lines.


Letters That You Will Not Get:
Women’s Voices from the Great War

Letters that you will not get

Letters That You Will Not Get: Women’s Voices from the Great War gives voice to American, British, European, Asian, African and Caribbean women affected by WWI through a series of vignettes that share their responses to the war—from enthusiasm to resignation; support to opposition; the war’s beginning to its end. Combining powerful contemporary music with excerpts from women’s writings on both sides of the conflict, Letters tells the story of the Great War as experienced by the women who lived through it. Click here to read more about this wonderful new opera, and learn how you can attend the premiere in Brooklyn later this month.


What Makes American Music American? The World War I Connection

Joshua Villanueva

There’s nothing more American than growing up in a multi-racial community, checking out K-pop videos on the internet, and showing off your latest dance moves on TikTok for the world to see. But have you wondered what exactly makes something American?”  So begins Joshua Villanueva’s thoughtful look at composer Aaron Copeland, and how the very concept of “American Music” (like so many other things) actually emerged from the nation’s experience in World War I,  Click here to read the entire article, and watch video of Joshua conducting a performance of Copeland’s Appalachian Spring


Finding Pvt. Henry V. Traynham

Pvt. Henry V. Traynham

An offhand remark by a relative was a “revelation” for Matt Mabe: he “never knew my great grandfather had a brother who had also served in WWI and had been killed in combat.” Spurred by a lifelong interest in military history, Mabe set out to learn more about his great-great uncle Henry V. Traynham. The search took years, including a trip to the the American Cemetery at Saint-Mihiel, and finally another family revelation. Click here to read the whole story of Mabe’s search, and how it came to a fitting end at the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.


A Promising Young Man: The Life and Times of a Casualty in World War One

Thomas ( Raysor Summers

The memory of how “In 1942 when I was eight years old, I accompanied my paternal grandmother, father, mother and brother in seeing the acclaimed and Academy Award movie Sergeant York in an Orangeburg, South Carolina theater” was the initial catalyst for Thomas A. Summers’s lifetime interest in “this young uncle whose name I carry” Thomas Raysor Summers (left), who was killed in action in WWI. As the Centennial of WWI came around, the long-held interest led Summers to research and write an amazing narrative about his uncle, after whom an American Legion Post in Orangeburg is now named. Get comfortable in your seat, then click here to read the absolutely fascinating and unforgettable story of the life, times, family, and wartime death of Sergeant Thomas Raysor Summers, U.S. Army.


Journey Log: Centennial

John Sterkendries

When his daughter moved from Belgium to Pittsburgh, PA in 1917 to study at Duquesne University, John Sterkendries became a frequent visitor to the U.S. After several years, he decided to buy a motorcycle here and see the country. On his local first ride, in a small town named Glassport, he “was astounded by the fact that every lamppost had a picture of a U.S. soldier attached to it. This kind of veteran pride is something that is unheard of in Belgium.” Back in Belgium, after visiting the WWI Memorial at Ypres, John became a man with a plan, one that would return him to the U.S. again and again. Click here to read the whole story about his inspiration, his mission, and how unexpected events have reshaped his intended “ride along the outer borders of the continental United States.”


Writing “On Assignment -The Great War”

On Assignment -The Great War cover

Writer Joseph Caro “decided to look-up some grade-school chums back in New Jersey that I hadn’t seen since 1957.” One conversation led to a discussion of his classmate’s grandfather, Eddie Jackson, a New York City news photographer a century ago. One thing led to another, and Caro ended up with a new book, On Assignment: The Great WarClick here to learn the incredible story of a photographer who used his connection to President Woodrow Wilson (among others) to talk his way into an Army uniform, a troop ship to France with the famous New York 27th Division, a front-row vantage point on the war and the peace negotiations, and a return visit to France in 1930 as the guide and head of the first delegation of Gold Star women.


“The Great War Through a Doughboy’s Eyes”: Miramar Beach veteran honors grandfather in new book

The Great War Through A Doughboy's Eyes cover

“The Great War Through a Doughboy’s Eyes” chronicles the service of Cpl. Howard P. Claypoole as told through the lens of his grandson and Miramar Beach resident Gregory S. Valloch. Claypoole served in the U.S. Army during World War I and was awarded a Purple Heart posthumously. Like his grandfather, Col. Gregory S. Valloch is an Army veteran who honorably served during the Gulf War. Click here to read more about the book, and how, using his grandfather’s diary entries, postcards, letters, wound order, newspaper clippings, military history and discharge papers, Valloch tells the story of a man with an unwavering allegiance to his country and a will to survive.


Scotch Plains Dedicates Street to Fallen WWI Soldier Sgt. Herbert Terry

Herbert Terry

The Township of Scotch Plains dedicated a sign to fallen soldier Sgt. Herbert Terry on Rahway Rd. on Friday, July 1. Sgt. Terry was killed in action on Sept. 24, 1918, in France during World War I after saving a fellow solider from gunfire. Sgt. Charles Wolfel, whom Terry saved, and who was captured and taken prisoner by the German army, said that Terry’s final words were: “Tell them I died fighting for my country.” The Terry family has lived in Scotch Plains since the time of the Revolutionary War. Click here to read the entire article.


Switchboard Soldiers: one of the great untold stories of World War I

Switchboard Soldiers

From New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Chiaverini comes Switchboard Soldiers, a bold, revelatory novel about one of the great untold stories of World War I–the women of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, who broke down gender barriers in the military, smashed the workplace glass ceiling, and battled a pandemic as they helped lead the Allies to victory. The women of the U.S. Army Signal Corps served with honor and played an essential role in achieving the Allied victory. Click here to read more about Switchboard Soldiers, and learn why their story has never been the focus of a novel…until now.


Harold A. Furlong: Michigan’s Only Native Son to Receive the Congressional Medal of Honor in World War I

Harold A Furlong

Harold Furlong was born in Pontiac, Michigan Aug. 1, 1895 where he was raised and graduated from Pontiac High School. He interrupted his college education at Michigan Agricultural College (later became Michigan State University) when he joined the U.S. Army in 1917. First Lieutenant Harold A. Furlong was recommended for the Congressional Medal of Honor by General John Pershing for his heroic action on Nov. 1, 1918. Click here to learn more about Furlong’s heroics, and how his postwar professional accomplishments also left an enduring legacy in Michigan, including an American Legion post named in his honor. 


The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Centennial Commemoration Lecture Series

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with flowers

In the months after the 2021 centennial of the creation of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the team at Arlington National Cemetery (ANC) has continued to make the programs created for this anniversary accessible to the public online.  On May 30, 2022—Memorial Day—ANC released a major virtual project as part of this ongoing effort: the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Centennial Commemoration Lecture Series. Click here to read more, and learn how this virtual lecture series originated during the culminating week of the Tomb Centennial. 


WWI Choctaw Code-Talkers in the news

Lots of articles recently about the Choctaw Code-Talkers of WWI:

Museum of Native American History logo

The Museum of Native American History in Arkansas partner with the Choctaw Nation for a presentation of the Choctaw Code Talkers for Memorial Day. Click here to learn more about and watch the video of this introduction to the Choctaw Code Talkers, recognizing the Choctaw veterans of WWI and discussing their history and lives as telephone warriors.

Choctaw Code Talkers aircraft art

The Oregon Air National Guard held a ceremony recently to dedicate the nosecone of one of their F-15 Eagle fighter aircraft with artwork that honors the Choctaw Code Talkers who served in WWI. Click here to see the art in place on the fighter jet, and read how the designers of the nose art was inspired by learning the history of the Choctaw Code Talkers from WWI.

Code Talker James Edwards

On the Atlas Obscura web site, puzzle aficionado and writer Alex Bellos discusses the Code Talkers, and how “Choctaw was a good choice, linguistically speaking, for a military code because the language is notoriously complicated and unlike other languages.” Click here to read more, and learn about efforts “to keep the Choctaw language modern, as it is still a very living language.”


WWI and the Bathing Suit: “Fashion Decrees Satin and Wool Jersey for Bathing Suits This Summer!”

Bathing Suits postwar

Writing in The Indiana History Blog, Jill Weiss Simins notes that “Bathing suits and policing decency have often been a topic of discussion and contention.”  However, “while looking through reels of newspapers from 1916-17, we became intrigued by the affect of World War One on the loosening of gendered fashion restrictions, especially as exemplified by the bathing suit.” Click here to read (and see) how World War I changed fashion (including women’s bathing attire) dramatically in large part because women’s roles had changed.


World War I News Digest July 2022

Shipyard

World War I was The War that Changed the World, and its impact on the United States continues to be felt a century later, as people across the nation learn more about and remember those who served in the Great War. Here’s a collection of news items from the last month related to World War I and America.

Borough Owes Boatload to WWI-Era Shipping Magnate

Hill 204: The 28th Division’s first combat action of WWI

Online fundraiser for American WWI hero’s headstone in Derry

Was ‘badass Marine’ denied a medal of honor for WWI valor?

The Great War in Color: Apocalypse World War I 

The Battle of Belleau Wood During WWI

The American Red Cross World War I Effort

Commissioners split on relocating World War I monument

Community raises $18K to refurbish 91-year-old WWI monument

Best Memorial to WWI Dead Would be Service to the Living

Gold Coast’s rich history and role in World War I

Thousands more died so World War I would end at 1100

Who Really Blew Up Mare Island in World War I?

Chip Forbes, long-time friend of the Doughboy Foundation


Doughboy MIA for July 2022

Earl Edward Jones

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Our Doughboy MIA this month this time around is a little different, as he isn’t actually MIA anymore!

Private Earl Edward Jones was born January 9th, 1894, in Meyersdale Pennsylvania. He was one of the TEN children that William and Mary Jones stocked their household with! His father William died of a stroke in December 1915, so Earl went to work, taking his father’s place as a coal miner in order to help support the family.

On May 31st 1917, Earl joined the Pennsylvania National Guard, figuring it to be the best way to get overseas faster. He was assigned to Company C of the 10th PA Guard which, upon federalization on July 15th of that year became Company C of the 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Division, training in part at Camp Hancock, Georgia. With the 110th he sailed for France aboard the City of Calcutta on May 3rd, 1918.

That summer, the 28th was engaged in the fighting around the Fismes sector and the Marne Valley.  It was there, on July 15th 1918 – exactly one year to the day that Earl’s unit had entered federal service – that during fighting outside the hamlet of Sauvigny, Earl and several of his comrades were captured. In a statement given to the C company commander, Captain William C. Truxal,  by Earl’s corporal, Herbert Jones (no relation) reads: “I helped to carry Private Earl E. Jones across the Marne River after having been taken prisoner. His left leg was blown off below the knee, he was bleeding profusely, and he was unconscious.  We put him down on the north side of the river and were not permitted to move him. Later on, one of the men told me that they had buried him in the Marne River.” The burial had been very hurried as the Germans were in no mood to let the doughboys honor their dead and they were quickly hustled off to a detention location before being sent off to a prison camp. Consequently, the grave went unmarked.

Click here to read the rest of the story!

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Merchandise from the Official
Doughboy Foundation WWI Store

Books --Lest We Forget & Honoring the Doughboys

Lest We Forget: The Great War World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library. One of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission and is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and what would become the Air Force. It serves as a lasting reminder that our world ignores the history of World War I (and the ensuing WWII) at its peril―lest we forget.

Honoring the Doughboys: Following My Grandfather’s World War I Diary is a stunning presentation of contemporary photographs taken by the author that are paired with diary entries written by his grandfather, George A. Carlson, who was a soldier in the U.S. Army during World War I. Jeff Lowdermilk followed his grandfather’s path through France, Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany and returned with these meticulously crafted photographs and his own engaging stories that bring the diary to life for contemporary readers. Lowdermilk’s passion for World War I and military history began as a young boy when he listened to his grandfather tell his stories about serving as an infantryman– a “Doughboy”–in Europe during the Great War.

Proceeds from the sale of these books will help finish the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the Doughboy Foundation.



WWI Memorial Visitor Guide App map screen

Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

QR Code for Virtual Explorer App download


Education Thumb Drive image

Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


Donation for Daily Taps


you can help - shop using amazon smile


Doughboy MIA


Legacy Society


Pershing Sponsors

Pershing Sponsors



John Simon Hilgenhold

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John Simon Hilgenhold

Submitted by: John Levi Hilgenhold {Great-Grandson}

John Simon Hilgenhold was born in 1892. John Hilgenhold served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

My great-grandfather, John Simon Hilgenhold, was born on March 24, 1892 in a rural community, known as St. Marks, in Perry County Indiana. The grandson of Dutch-German immigrants, he was the seventh of eleven children. As a young man he completed his education after the eighth grade, as was customary for the time, and worked on the family farm with his father and three brothers.

John registered for the draft on June 5, 1917 at the age of 25. Just under a year later, on May 28, 1918 he was drafted into service of the U.S. National Army and reported to Camp Zachary Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky along with forty-eight other Perry County men. One of whom, Carl Goelzer, would eventually become his brother-in-law. He trained as an infantryman with the 44th Company, 11th Battalion, 159th Depot Brigade and completed basic training on June 16th.

He was then transferred to Company M, 153rd Infantry Regiment, 39th National Guard Division that was stationed at Camp Beauregard near Alexandria, Louisiana. This influx of new recruits brought the division up to full strength and they set sail from Newport News, Virginia a little over a month later on August 6th aboard the S.S. Kursk, a converted British troop transport. Upon arrival in Brest, France, the 153rd traveled to the St. Florent region, southwest of Bourges, until it was dismantled and its personnel sent to replace battlefield losses in existing combat divisions.

Private Hilgenhold was transferred to Company C, 126th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division on September 13th. Days later, the division mobilized in preparation of the Meuse-Argonne offensive, the largest battle in American history to date.

Read John Simon Hilgenhold’s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family’s Story of Service here.


Honor the Stories of Service of ALL Who Served.

Do Your Bit to Help Build the new National World War I Memorial.

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WWI DISPATCH Juneteenth 2022 Special Issue

An appropriate item for today from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission.


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Juneteenth 2022 Special Issue

369th Experience NYC 2019

The 369th Experience performing in New York’s Rockefeller Center in 2019. The band, which is made up of music students from Historically Black Colleges and Universities across the U.S., plays the musical repertoire of New York’s legendary 369th Regiment “Harlem Hellfighters” Regimental Jazz Band.

Juneteenth Musical Salute in DC to the
369th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Harlem Hellfighters

369th Experience logo

The 369th Experience, an official program of the US World War I Centennial Commission, is hosting a series of events and performances this weekend in Washington, DC, in recognition of Juneteenth, Black Music Month and the military and musical contributions of the 369th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Harlem Hellfighters. Forward March for Freedom will bring band students from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other schools across the country to Washington, DC to participate in a series of events and performances, highlighted by several public performances Saturday, June 18, and Sunday June 19.

The 369th Experience’s re-creation band is comprised of 65 African American and Puerto Rican male band members from 17 HBCUs and other schools in the United States.

The 369th Experience performances on Juneteenth weekend are listed below. You can follow the preparations of the 369th Experience on the Doughboy Foundation Facebook page leading up to the weekend events.

Saturday, June 18

White House to WWI Memorial March 8:00 a.m.

1919 Victory Parade

On Saturday, June 18, the 369th Experience will form up for a Symbolic March from The White House to the National World War I Memorial site. Marching with them will be “The President’s Own” US Marine Band, as well as the descendants of the original 369th Regimental Band’s leaders James Reese Europe and Noble Sissle. The parade route (from in front of the White House to 15th St. NW, south on 15th Street to the Memorial site at Pennsylvania Ave.) will follow in reverse the 1919 victory parade on Pennsylvania Ave. that ended at the White House.

National WWI Memorial Concert 9:00 a.m.

369th at Memorial site

The 369th Experience and “The President’s Own” US Marine Band will perform in concert at the National World War I Memorial starting at 9:00 a.m. Located on Pennsylvania Ave. NW between 14th. and 15th. streets, the Memorial offers ample amphitheater step seating for the free & open to the public concert.

Kennedy Center Concert 6:00 p.m.

369th at Kennedy Center

The 369th Experience will perform a free  live (and live-streamed) concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Millennium Stage. Click here for more information on how to reserve free tickets to attend the live event in person at Kennedy Center Saturday, or how to watch the live stream of the concert from home.

Sunday, June 19

Something in the Water Festival 7:00 p.m.

Something in the Water

The 369th Experience will perform in concert with singer and songwriter Jon Batiste as part of the Something in the Water Festival in Washington, DC at 7:00 p.m. (scheduled) on Sunday, June 19. Click here to learn more about the Festival taking place June 17-19, and how to purchase tickets for the event.


James Reese Europe sheet music

The 369th Experience was created to acknowledge, educate, and preserve the legacy of The 369th Infantry Regiment, a regiment made up of African American and Puerto Rican soldiers who were not allowed to fight with their fellow Americans in World War I due to their race. Instead they braved the battlefield alongside French soldiers and went on to become one of the longest-serving, most decorated units of the American Expeditionary Force. In addition to their bravery on the battlefield, the Harlem Hellfighters were brilliant musicians who introduced ragtime, big band and jazz to the world, changing the course of music forever.

The band has performed music from the original 369th Regimental Infantry Band’s musical repertoire at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the National Museum of African American History & Culture, and Rockefeller Center and the opening of The Shed in New York.

The Juneteenth events by the 369th Experience are sponsored by the Doughboy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, Google, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the National Basketball Association (NBA), the National Basketball Players Association Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.


The Harlem Hellfighters of World War I

369th soldiers

By the end of World War I, the Croix de Guerre, France’s highest military honor, would be awarded to the 369th Infantry Regiment. Better known as the Harlem Hellfighters, the regiment was an all-black American unit serving under French command in World War I, and they spent a stunning 191 days at the Front, more than any other American unit. In that time, they never lost a trench to the enemy or a man to capture. Instead, they earned the respect of both allies and enemies, helped introduce Jazz to France, and returned home to a grateful city where hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers turned out to welcome home 3,000 Hellfighter heroes in a victory parade that stretched from 23rd Street and 5th Avenue to 145th Street and Lenox. Click here to read more, and learn how the 369th’s postwar reception was much different from the way New York sent them off to war.


369th group

Who Are They?
Men in the 369th Infantry Iconic Photo

The photo above was taken on February 12, 1919, as soldiers from the 369th Infantry Regiment were waiting to disembark in New York on their way home from the Great War in Europe. This photo is one of several iconic photos of the 369th Infantry. Few of them, however, were accompanied by captions giving the soldiers’ names or anything about them. The 369th Infantry, whose members called themselves Harlem’s Rattlers, was the most famous all-Black regiment to fight during World War I. By the end of the war, France awarded the regiment the Croix de Guerre, and one hundred-seventy-one of the regiment’s men received individual Croix de Guerre medals for their valor.  Click here to read more, and learn more about the individual soldiers pictured in the famous photo, and how the 369th “helped to establish to the entire world the power of black soldiers in the military.”



Virtual Explorer logo new

Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

QR Code for Virtual Explorer App download


Education Thumb Drive image

Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


Donation for Daily Taps


you can help - shop using amazon smile



Doughboy MIA


Pershing Sponsors

Pershing Sponsors



WWI DISPATCH June 2022

A monthly newsletter from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission, which may be of interest to members.


View this in your browser

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June 2022

Smithsonian Magazine combo with cover

Front page article about National World War I Memorial sculpture in June 2022 Smithsonian Magazine.

Sculpture for National World War I Memorial receives national TV and print coverage

May 2022 was a great month for national awareness about the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC, as work on the sculpture received great television and print coverage. First was Smithsonian Magazine (circulation on the order of 2 million) with a massive 16-paqe in-depth article about sculptor Sabin Howard’s studio in New Jersey. Then shortly before Memorial Day, the Fox 5 New York television station visited the studio in Englewood for a terrific broadcast piece interviewing Howard and some modern-day veterans there to look at the sculpture in progress. The piece was picked up by dozens of Fox stations across the country and rebroadcast to millions of potential viewers nationwide, including Alaska and Hawaii.

Fox5 New York interview with SH

Interview by Fox 5 televison station in New York was seen nationwide.


Apps image for Verizon announcement

The Doughboy Foundation partners with Verizon to bring WWI Memorial “Virtual Explorer” AR App to K-12 educators

Verizon innovative learning logo

The Doughboy Foundation and Verizon have executed a Partnership Agreement to bring the award-winning WWI Memorial “Virtual Explorer” App and other supporting WWI Educational materials to Verizon Innovative Learning HQ. The Verizon Innovative Learning HQ education portal focuses on delivering free Next-Gen learning for all. Aimed at K-12 students and teachers, the portal offers innovative augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) apps, tailored lesson plans and professional development resources that make learning contemporary, engaging, and immersive. Click here to read more about this exciting new partnership that will bring learning about America and World War I to schools all across the nation this fall.


Daily Taps at the National WWI Memorial

Matthew Barker, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Member: “Nothing is more humbling than playing Taps.”

Matthew Barker

This month, Matthew Barker, who prefers to be called Matt, shares his unique story with us as one of the buglers who sounds Daily Taps at the National World War I Memorial, “Rain or Shine.”

Says Matt, “I grew up in Houston, Texas, and currently live in Columbia, MD. I’m a full-time member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra trumpet section; I won that position in 2016. A trumpeter friend of mine who is the main bugler at the WW1 memorial graciously asked me to play Taps on occasion, as my schedule allows.” Click here to read more, and find out how sounding Taps has a deeply personal meaning for Matt.


Army Band Rush Hour concerts

U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own” is back for second year of Rush Hour Concerts at The National World War I Memorial in DC

Picking up where they left off in 2021, the U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own is back at the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC this summer for a series of Thursday Evening Rush Hour Concerts from June through September, weather permitting. The concerts are part of the band’s 100th anniversary year. Here are the planned dates and times for the 2022 series:

  • Thursday, June 30, 6:30 pm, Brass Quintet
  • Thursday, July 7, 6:30 pm, Jazz Combo
  • Thursday, August 11, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • ThursdayAugust 18, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • Thursday, August 25, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • Thursday, September 1, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • Thursday, September 8, 6:30 pm, Concert Band
  • Thursday, September 15, 6:30 pm, Concert Band
  • Thursday, September 22, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble
  • Thursday, September 29, 6:30 pm, Army Band ensemble

The Band starts to set up at the Memorial after the completion of Daily Taps at 5:00 pm, and the concerts start promptly at 6:30.pm. There is plenty of seating at the Memorial with good views of the band. In case of inclement weather on a concert day, check the Band’s web site or social media to determine the status of the event.


National World War I Memorial has Doughboy in Uniform Playing ‘Taps’ Every Night

Taps bugler snip

The widely-read Military.com web site published an extensive article recently on the Doughboy Foundation’s commitment to ensure that Taps is sounded every day at 5:00 pm Eastern Time, rain or shine, at the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. Writer Blake Stilwell looks at the history of Taps in America since it came into usage since the middle of the Civil War. Click here to read the entire fine article, and learn how the official “National Song of Remembrance” is “especially fitting for the National World War I Memorial.”


American soldiers killed in WWI remembered forever in NYC ale house

McSorley’s Old Ale House snip

Every day is Memorial Day at McSorley’s Old Ale House in Manhattan. It has been for more than 100 years, courtesy of a haunting, dusty reminder of the last stateside meal enjoyed by young American men before they were killed in Europe in World War I. Click here to read the entire article, and learn how “Amid the bonhomie of a nostalgic neighborhood beer joint, McSorley’s quietly displays a haunting tribute to American doughboys whose wish for safe return from the battlefields of World War I was never granted.


On Memorial Day, remember Meuse-Argonne

John Henry Jenkins

Writer Chris Gibbon frequently chronicles the stories of the over 1,500 alumni of Philadelphia’s Roman Catholic High School who served in World War I. Thirty-four of them gave their lives. He writes “When I found the World War I Service and Compensation File of 1st Lieutenant John H. Jenkins, I immediately looked at the document’s “Engagements” section. I often do that now when reviewing these files because this section lists the battles in which a veteran fought, which will give me an idea of what he may have endured. There are two words I often find in this section that always give me pause.” Click here to read the whole article, and learn how “the largest and deadliest battle ever fought by American soldiers” had a particular impact on the Roman alumni.


Corry, PA commemorates local WWI veteran for special service to nation

Corry PA sign Charles P. Keating

Members of the Corry community gathered on a warm and sunny Memorial Day afternoon to honor WWI veteran and Corry native Charles P. Keating, not only for his service in the war, but for the key role he played in selecting and bringing home America’s first unknown soldier, now buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. A historical marker recognizing Keating’s service was unveiled in front of the building where Keating and a partner operated the Alexander-Keating Funeral Home in the 1920s and early 30s. Click here to learn more about how Keating braved shellfire and mustard gas to retrieve and identify fallen American soldiers, and without whom the nation likely would not have recovered its first unknown soldier.


1st U.S. serviceman killed in WWI died in Maine, but who killed him is a mystery

Maine guns John Poor story 062022

On Saturday morning, March 24, 1917, a telegram messenger shouted the awful news from the front gate, across the Poor family’s Illinois front yard and into their windows. Their son was dead. Pvt. John Poor was killed the previous day in a midnight shootout at Fort Williams, far away, on the coast of Maine. German spies were thought to be responsible. Click here to read more, and learn how, though the country didn’t officially enter WWI for another 10 days, Poor’s death while guarding the seaside battery in Cape Elizabeth, likely made him the first serviceman to die in the line of duty while serving in the United States’ armed forces during the “War to End All Wars.”


Marines honor the fallen from WWI’s Battle of Belleau Wood 104 years ago

Belleau Wood wreath

U.S. Marines participated in a memorial ceremony alongside representatives from the French and German militaries at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery in Belleau, France, 29 May 2022. The ceremony is held annually in recognition of the Marines, soldiers and sailors of all three nations who fought and died in the Battle of Belleau Wood in June of 1918. Click here to learn how this annual event is “an essential part of the work for peace, and a foundation for the prevention of future wars.”


Remembering Eddie Grant, Major League Baseball’s first World War I fatality

Eddie Grant

Eddie Grant, a Harvard Law School graduate and a former third baseman who played for the Cleveland Indians, Philadelphia Phillies, Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants, was the first major league baseball player killed in World War I. In all, seven other major league players lost their lives in the Great War. Click here to learn more about Grant, who enlisted at age 33 because “I believe there is no greater duty than I owe for being that which I am – an American citizen.’’


Providence, RI unveils the 3rd monument to local World War I soldier

Carlo Lafazia monument Rhode Island

“Hopefully the word ‘finally’ has come to pass, and we won’t be doing this again anytime soon,” said Jeremiah O’Connor, as a new monument to his uncle, a fallen World War I soldier, was unveiled Friday. It’s the third time O’Connor’s family has tried to honor Carlo Lafazia, who was killed on French soil, fighting back the Germans in a final Allied assault during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. He died Oct. 11, 1918, one month before the war ended. Click here to read more, and learn how two previous memorials to Lafazia in Providence disappeared or were destroyed.


A life remembered: World War I soldier exhibited bravery on, off the battlefield

Milton Barkley Mackall funeral snip

In the shade of an old beech tree at the Christ Church cemetery in Port Republic sits a dark gray headstone pockmarked with splotches of moss. While his grave may be unassuming, the life of First Lt. Milton Barkley Mackall was anything but. After being seriously injured in World War I by a sniper’s bullet to his spine, Mackall spent six years confined to a bathtub.  Click here to read more, and learn how “Mackall’s story is the most unique from that era because of his circumstance of treatment.


Louisiana’s Fort Polk could be renamed after WWI hero William Henry Johnson

William Henry Johnson

Louisiana’s Fort Polk could be renamed, along with eight other U.S. Army installations around the nation which were originally named for Confederate leaders. The announcement comes from the military’s Naming Commission, which has submitted its report to Congress. Under the recommendation, Fort Polk could be renamed to Fort Johnson, in honor of Sgt. William Henry Johnson, an African-American World War I Medal of Honor recipient from North Carolina who served in the 369th U.S. Infantry Regiment. Click here to read more about Johnson’s heroic service in World War I, and the Naming Commission’s report.


Over there: rethinking American First World War literature and culture

First World War studies

The journal First World War Studies has published a Special Issue that examines “the specifically American literary and cultural production of the First World War and what distinguishes it from other national war literatures and cultures.” In her introduction to the special issue, Alice Kelly says that “the articles seek to assess how we should characterize, theorize and categorize American First World War cultural production.”  Click here to read more, and learn why “Despite the many memorials and memory sites to American participation, and the impact of the recent centenary, public memory of the conflict in the US remains minimal…”


“We were young, they say. We have died. Remember us.” 

Chris Isleib

The University of Sothern California’s SC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences recently published an article in its magazine featuring USC Dornsife and WWI Centennial Commission alumnus Chris Isleib, noting how he “helped create the first national memorial for World War I veterans, part of a long career spent telling the stories of America’s military.”  Click here to read the entire article, and see how the self-described “big history nerd” learned about the Centennial Commission and became one of its first volunteers and later a full-time employee as the Director of Public Affairs.


The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Education Module for all ages

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Education Module

As part of the centennial commemoration of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington National Cemetery (ANC) released a special Tomb of the Unknown Soldier education module. This module explores themes and topics related to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier through digital materials created for audiences of all ages. This module was the fourth education module released as part of Arlington National Cemetery’s (ANC) first Education Program, launched in 2020. Click here to read more, and learn about the centrality of World War I to the story of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. 


This is how Eddie Rickenbacker earned
7 service crosses and the Medal of Honor

Eddie Rickenbacker

Once America entered World War I some of the first forces it sent to France were those of the newly-formed Air Service. Among those troops was a relatively famous racecar driver and mechanic: Eddie Rickenbacker. When Rickenbacker enlisted in the Army, he had dreams of flying but was shipped to France as a driver for the General Staff due to his experience as a racecar driver. His advanced age (27 at the time) and lack of a college degree also disqualified him for flight training – but he was undeterred. Click here to read more, and learn how “friends in high places” got Rickenbacker into flight training, and how he got himself into the history books as America’s “Ace of Aces.”


Hidden History: the “Hello Girls” of WWI

Hello Girls switchboard

Writing  for the Daily Kos web site, Lenny Flank takes a look at how “during the First World War, the US Army depended for most of its tactical communications upon a small group of female volunteers called ‘the Hello Girls’.” He notes how, for military communications, “the armies of the First World War turned to another new technology—the telephone…During the Great War, troops on all sides laid thousands of miles of telephone wires.” Flank notes further that “When the United States entered the war in 1917, General John “Black Jack” Pershing needed to set up a similar communications network. But there was a problem: the US Signal Corps had fewer than 1600 men, and most of them were telegraph operators who had never been trained to run a telephone switchboard.” Click here to read the entire article, and learn how Pershing asked the famous “Hello Girls” to solve his critical problem, and how they responded.


The Man Nobody Knew and Facial Wound Narratives after World War I

Isolation Ward at US Army General Hospital No. 40

Writing for the Nursing Clio collaborative blog project web site, Evan Sullivan uses a 1919 novel that “reflected the American public’s simultaneous confidence in medicine, and searing unease about the facial reconstruction of wounded soldiers after World War I” as the springboard for a look at the work of US Army General Hospital No. 40 in St. Louis to reintegrate facially wounded WWI veterans into postwar society. Click here to read the fascinating story, and learn how the effort to focus on “medical transformation rather than trauma” was a common (and unfortunate) factor in both the novel and the Army hospital’s work.


Two U.S. Army soldiers who served
in both the Civil War and World War I

Hains and Keen

The Civil War in the United States ended on May 9, 1865. The United States entered World War I on April 6, 2022. (That’s 51 years, 10 months, 29 days, if anyone is counting.) Yet there are two United States Army officers who managed to serve in both conflicts. Major General Peter Conover Hains was a 1st Lieutenant at the first battle of Bull Run when he fired the signal gun that started the battle. He finished WWI as the oldest officer in the service. Click here to learn more about his incredible career, and why Washington, DC remembers his name to this day. Major (Dr.) William Williams Keen, Jr. was a pioneering military doctor whose career spanned surgical duty on the bloody battlefields of the American Civil War through influential research work during World War I. Click here to read more about “America’s first brain surgeon,” and learn how Keen’s work led to significant improvements in battlefield survival rates during conflicts in the 20th century.


America’s Experimental Helmets of WWI

Model 8 Experimental Helmet

When America entered World War I in 1918, the United States military was equipped with the then-modern Model 1903 Springfield rifle, but it lagged behind in new technologies like machine guns, and modern metal helmets.  Most U.S. soldiers were issued a helmet that wasn’t really all that different from the British MkI “Tin Hat,” which had been introduced in the early months of 1916. The United States would continue to wear the basic helmet — albeit with an updated liner — until 1940. Yet, largely forgotten is the fact that the United States had sought to develop its own helmet during the war. Click here to read more, and learn how several models were actually considered, how Dr. Bashford Dean became an important name in the discussion.


Pickelhaube Pyramids: A hat tip to the strangest monuments of World War I

Pickelhaube Pyramids snip

British historian Dr. Mark Felton takes a look on his YouTube channel at how, in New York in 1919, two strange pyramids were built as part of US victory celebrations. The pyramids were made from captured German Pickelhaube, the iconic spiked helmet. Click here to view the video, and read the accompanying article from the Rare Historical Photos web site, as Felton explores the long and colorful history of the iconic Pickelhaube, how they fell ingloriously out of use in the carnage of World War I, how the artifacts ended up in New York City after the war, and how there could be one still floating around out there that might be worth a whole lot of money.


World War I News Digest June 2022

Doughboys marching snip

World War I was The War that Changed the World, and its impact on the United States continues to be felt a century later, as people across the nation learn more about and remember those who served in the Great War. Here’s a collection of news items from the last month related to World War I and America.

What Was a Doughboy?

Reviewing A Machine-Gunner In France

WWI Memorial one of 10 New Attractions to Visit in D.C.

Who Are They? Men in the 369th Infantry Iconic Photo

The Harlem Hellfighters of World War I

Michigan-Wisconsin division had major role in World War I

Landmarks Illinois publishes WWI Monuments of Illinois Database

Three East Greenwich WWI Veterans Who Didn’t Come Home

Ripon American Legion named for 1st casualties of WWI, WWII

Seven Indiana WWI heroes followed for PBS documentary

Memorial Day: The True Reason for the Season


Doughboy MIA for June 2022

Arnold Matthew McInery.

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Our Doughboy MIA this month is 1st LT Arnold Matthew McInery.

Born April 23rd, 1893, Lieutenant McInery was a student at Notre Dame University when war broke out. He enlisted in the first officer’s training program at Ft. Benjamin Harrison on May 15th, 1917. Upon completion of his training he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant and went overseas with the 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Division. While leading his company into an attack during the Battle of Soissons on July 18th, 1918, Lt. McInery was killed in action and interred in a makeshift battlefield grave, which was never located after. The company he led into battle that day was later decorated by the French for bravery in action during that attack.

Would you like to help us solve this case?  Give ‘Ten For Them’ to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Merchandise from the Official
Doughboy Foundation WWI Store

WWI Poppy Lapel Pin

Poppy Lapel Pin

Back in stock!

♦ Exclusive Commemorative WW1 Poppy Lapel Pin

♦ First Colors Commemoration

♦ Soft enamel color design

♦ Approx. 1.5 inch in dia.

♦ Standard military clasp

Proceeds from the sale of these pins will help finish the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the Doughboy Foundation.



WWI Memorial Visitor Guide App map screen

Click or scan the QR Code below to download the Virtual Explorer App for the National World War I Memorial, and explore what the Memorial will look like when work is completed.

QR Code for Virtual Explorer App download


Education Thumb Drive image

Free Self-Contained WWI History Web Site on YOUR computer

Sources, lessons, activities, videos, podcasts, images

We have packaged all the content we created for “How WWI Changed America” into a format that is essentially a web site on a drive. Download the content onto any drive (USB, external, or as a folder on your computer), and all the content is accessible in a web site type format even without an internet connection. Click here to learn more, and download this amazing educational resource for home or classroom use.


Genealogy book FREE DOWNLOAD


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Michele Francalangia

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Michele Francalangia

Submitted by: Maria Pietrantuono {great grand-niece}

Michele Francalangia born around January 28, 1898 . Michele Francalangia served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

Michele Francalangia was born on January 28, 1898 in Campodipietra in the province of Campobasso to Carlo Francalangia and Beatrice Paventi. He spent his childhood in Molise until he was sixteen when, on boarding from Naples in 1914, he joined his brother Giovanni in Cleveland in the state of Ohio where he had settled for a few years working for a steel mill. Shortly after his arrival, he joined another brother, Antonio, in the mining communities of West Virginia where, in June 28, 1917, he volunteered for the American army, enlisted in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio. Michele (Franch as reported on the service documents) initially became part of the C battery of the 17th field artillery regiment organized at Camp Robinson in Wisconsin and then of the 2nd battery of the 7th field artillery regiment.

The recruits crossed the ocean on October 31, 1917 aboard the Mount Vernon transport and once in France Michele was transferred to the F Battery of the 5th Artillery Regiment. After an initial garrison of the Sommerville and Ansauville sector, the 5th supported the operations of the first AEF division and the 60th French division in the Montdidier sector from April to July 1918.

During those weeks, the regiment fired between 5,000 and 15,000 bullets a day, contributing significantly to the interruption of German communications and the capture of the village of Cantigny.

Click here to read Michele Francalangia’s entire Story of Service.

Click here to submit your family’s Story of Service.


Honor the Stories of Service of ALL Who Served.

Do Your Bit to Help Build the new National World War I Memorial.

Fundraising Progress Macquette 06022022


A letter from Dan Dayton

An item from the organization formerly known as the World War One Centennial Commission.


Five start 260
One-year anniversary of Daily Taps @ the WWI Memorial showing bugler


Happy Anniversary to Daily Taps at the WWI Memorial!

Dear Friend

Thanks to your support we have been able to render taps every evening at 5PM at the national WWI Memorial in Washington, DC for one full year, rain or shine. We’ve put up some images and links and Memorial Day notes just click below:

Memorial Day 2022

In cooperation with Taps for Veterans this honor has been a symbol of commitment.  Our buglers, always in Doughboy Uniform, have been loyal and steadfast in their duty.  In snow, rain, wind…and interestingly in the face of navigating the U.S. Secret Service who were guarding dignitaries at the Willard Hotel across the street. (We’re now good friends).

So today we salute Taps for Veterans.

We’ll continue to raise funds with the goal to guarantee that taps will be sounded at the WWI Memorial in perpetuity.

Support Daily Taps

We are also delighted to support Taps for Veterans and their partner CBS News in Taps Across America. Taps will be sounded at the WWI Memorial on Memorial Day at 3PM, and of course again at 5.

Learn more: Taps Across America

For those of you who live in DC, and the tri-state area that PBS station WETA serves, I hope you will be able to enjoy a documentary we’ve put together on the making of the new National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C.. It will air at 8PM on Memorial Day and again on Tuesday 5/31. [See WETA Airing Schedule] It is called: Last Battle: The Fight for America’s World War I Memorial.

View Trailer

So please enjoy you upcoming Memorial Day weekend, and remember who we are saluting.

All the best,

Dans Signature

Dan Dayton

Executive Director, WWI Centennial Commission
Chairman/CEO, Doughboy Foundation


WEBINAR POSTED ON-DEMAND: “Can the lessons of WWI help us avoid WWIII”

The recording for this event that may be of interest to members is now available.


Doughboy Foundation 2021 webinar logo

Available
On-Demand
Now

LINK TO ACCESS

Lessons from WWI promo

Poignant, relevant, insightful
and a little scary


Now available on-demand
as video, podcast or transcript

Our panel of leading WWI historians and experts explored ways that an understanding of WWI might help us avoid slipping into a larger and more devastating world conflict through the crisis in Ukraine.

No one intended WWI. How did a relatively minor event evolve into a global cataclysm? What are the parallels? WWI, WWII and the conflict in Ukraine all involve the Baltic region. Why might that be? What lessons from WWI can be applied to the region, situation and conditions today to forestall escalation? What lessons from WWI might the diplomats and negotiators keep in mind as they explore the paths and roadblocks to peace?

If you attended, we created a transcript as a reference. It is a surprisingly interesting read. If you did not, choose your way of accessing the event. We have the webinar video, an audio podcast (great for drivetime) and the transcript available on-demand.

Thank you.

LINK TO ACCESS


Raising Funds for Humanitarian Relief

Humanitarian relief fundraising thermometer

The webinar is also a fundraiser for humanitarian relief aimed at Ukrainian refugees. Estimates are that more than 12,000,000 have left their homes. The humanitarian crisis is real and severe.

So we are asking you – our friends and the entire WWI community of interest to help. All funds will go directly to provide shelter, food and care for these Ukrainian refugees. They need our help.

In memory of young Herbert Hoover and his humanitarian relief efforts in Belgium in WWI, Read the story by clicking above to understand why you should help today in 2022.

To Donate Now

Please text WWIHELP to the number 41444

OR CLICK TO DONATE